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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good morning to each of you
Over my 6 months of ownership the ignition lock has gotten easier & easier to manipulate.
It no longer requires fiddling every start.
However I had all but given up on ever finding the Accessory position; and had never been able to engage it.
That is until yesterday when it just slipped into ACC with no effort.
Of course I have not been able to duplicate the result since.


Have any of you found a fix for this?
AND/OR
found things that are DO NOT TRY?


Thanks
 

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Good morning to each of you
Over my 6 months of ownership the ignition lock has gotten easier & easier to manipulate.
It no longer requires fiddling every start.
However I had all but given up on ever finding the Accessory position; and had never been able to engage it.
That is until yesterday when it just slipped into ACC with no effort.
Of course I have not been able to duplicate the result since.


Have any of you found a fix for this?
AND/OR
found things that are DO NOT TRY?


Thanks
Sounds like the Key is worn or the Key switch cylinder is needing some graphite lubricant
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Sounds like the Key is worn or the Key switch cylinder is needing some graphite lubricant
Thanks OkDually
I have 4 keys.
2 I got with the truck plus 1 copy of each.
There's no difference in how they perform

That could be the case if duplicating worn keys, of course

I'll try graphite again
The one time I applied it when I got the truck it was by sprinkling on the key.
I'll try a squeeze bottle or an aerosol;around and inside the cylinder
 

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1995 GMC Suburban
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The keylock cylinder is not difficult to replace.
There are a lot of Youtube video on it.
 

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My 98 was like that when I got it. I was going to just replace it but since all the other locks worked and I wanted to keep the key the same I just had a locksmith re pin the original lock. They can also make new keys by code rather than building errors making copies of worn keys. Trick is finding a locksmith that still works on cars, most don't because of all the electronic stuff the last 10+ years.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
My 98 was like that when I got it. I was going to just replace it but since all the other locks worked and I wanted to keep the key the same I just had a locksmith re pin the original lock. They can also make new keys by code rather than building errors making copies of worn keys. Trick is finding a locksmith that still works on cars, most don't because of all the electronic stuff the last 10+ years.

Thanks for the hint 57diesel
You mean they still have locksmiths in Minnesota?
The last real one in DC (Capitol Lock) closed down about 7 years ago when it became more lucrative to sell the property to developers than to keep the business open.
What we have now are ACE Hardwares, & such, where the college kid can copy any key on earth, as long as the blank is in stock

It may truly be easier (in this town) for me to replace the ignition & 2 door locks than it would be to find anyone that even knows what re pinning a lock means

If the graphite fails, drastic measures may follow
 

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Had the dealership make me a key. fixed problem. Old keys copied in a key machine are a bit off spec from wear and being copied.
 

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You can get a new lock cyl. keyed to your existing key and extra new keys.
I did it a few times before I got all the parts to do it myself, except cutting the keys.
 

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I think locksmiths exist everywhere its just a lot of places they don't seem to want to deal with the general public. The guy that did mine I met at work. We had a couple doors we wanted locks added to. I think it took me a year to find someone to even come do that. They guy that finally came ended up up selling is on like $5k in work so I would assume it was worth his trouble. While he was working I mentioned the lock in my new truck. I already had it out so it was easy.
The real locksmiths cut keys based on numbers not copies of copies. Some can eyeball a key and know the numbers. They also have a machine to put it in and just know the brand and how many steps they have so they can tell that there was no 1 1/2 for that brand so it must be a worn 2. Their key cutting machine then has the numbers so they cut a 2-3-5-2 or whatever.
 

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The cheapest option will be to have a new key cut and see if the key is the problem.
Unless, you have a spare key in better condition.

The aftermarket keylock cylinder usually comes with key.
Unfortunately, the key is not going to work with the door.
Or you can get GM key cylinder but then you need the stealership to rekey (move the pins) to work with existing key. Amazon sells the GM key cylinder without the pins.
Or DIY to move the pins if you know how using Youtube.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If you decide to replace the lock cylinder,
this seller is good. Genuine GM parts and can match keys. Has always worked well for me.
The cheap aftermarket cylinders with key will only have 4 or 5 pins in them instead of the 9 they should have, surprise!
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Chevy-GMC-...tyMailSmallFlatRateBox!78552!US!-1:rk:64:pf:0

Thank you, Glagulator
That's very valuable info; and it's going directly into my personal sticky folder.
If the current measures fail Wolf will have me a new customer
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Here's an update that I hope will make you chuckle
The graphite on the key and around the cylinder had no effect on easing the switch into the ACC position.
What did happen is; when opening the driver door, with no key in the ignition,the warning beep sounded as if the key were still in

It appears that the metallic properties of the graphite "fooled" the magnetic key system.
I blew it out with some dry lube and put a end to the issue

The short story is that Wolf Security will be hearing from me soon.
 
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thanks for following up with what solved your problem.
 
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