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What is the general consesus about idling? I mean is it a bad thing? I am not really talking about hours, just 20-30 min. I have a friend with a new Powerstroke and he says it's not good to let that motor idle a lot. I used to let my '03 Duramax idle a good bit and had no problems. I am about to pick up my new LBZ and was just wondering. Doesn't the LBZ have an accelerated idle feature? Is there anything I need to know about this?

Thanks a lot!
 

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Have been told that if you let an diesel engine idle to long, because they don't have throttle blades to restrict air flow that they can cool off to below operating temp. below 180 degrees, the pistons will shrink or begin to cool off enough to not allow them to be se
ated properly or expanded properly in the cylinder.
most truck drivers that i know use idle feature on bigger trucks if posssible to prevent this problem.
You can watch your temp. gauge fall if you idle for any amount of time.
 

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I was told by a big rig driver that it is illegal to let them idle. Anybody ever hear anything like that??
 

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Haven't heard anything about it being illegal, but personally, if I'm stopped for more than a couple of minutes, it gets shut off.
I'll leave it running while refueling only if I'm getting fuel when it's not warmed up yet.
 

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In some larger cities they have ordinances that outlaw idling. Cuts down on smog etc. Plus lots of folks don't like the smell of diesel exhaust (weird)

Down the road in D.C. they have cracked down on tour buses idling. In a few weeks the spring field trips will start. In the past it would get nasty with all of the idling buses all over town.

Years ago when I worked for a large trucking company, they would pay bonuses to drivers that would not let their rigs idle (monitored by the on board computer that would also track RPMs, Speed etc.). Some of the drivers would shut them off at long traffic lights to help earn bonus cents per mile. I would assume some of the larger companies (ie: J.B. Hunt, Schneider etc.) might still be doing this (one reason they make moo-laa and other companies seem to be always on the "brink").

Like most of us, I love the sound of my Dmax idling, but I shut it off when I am stopped for more than a minute or so. Last spring I was camping at Cowans' Gap in PA. Some nitwit in a PS in the site next to mine got up a 6am, fired up the PS and let it idle for 1/2 hour. After this nitwit was finished waking up everyone in the campground, he came out and shut it offCensored. Go figure. What an idiot.
 

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Idling is a Hold-over from old Trucking days. One reason to was to keep Heat on at Nite and cooling in Summer. A lot of O/O`s now run an Auxiliary unit just for this reason. The overall cost is supposedly paid for many times over. I`ve also heard the Older Detroit Diesels could not be Idled due to poor Oil circulation.
 

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If you idle the engine up to 1,000 to 1,100 rpm, you won't really do anything except waste fuel. If you leave it at dead idle for prolonged periods you will increase wear in the engine. The oil jets that cool the pistons just don't operate very well at 600 rpm.
 

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Idling the engine serves NO useful purpose for ANY reason any time PERIOD!. If you must idle ( heat,cooling,Pto Ie: emergency equipment ) it is best to be able to do it at 1000/1100 rpm There is a book out there somewhere that says when every engine turns a certain number of RPM's it will die,it makes sense to put the number as far into the future as possiable.Also yes it is correct ,it is illeagle in most places and more everyday you can Google "Idle laws" and it will give you state to state info , it's mostly pointed at large trucks but applys to all.
 

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The amount of time you idle vs. cranking- Ive read and noticed that if you are going to be driving within 4-5 mins, then dont turn the truck off. When you crank, the engine would burn more fuel than idleing for 4-5 mins.
 

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The amount of time you idle vs. cranking- Ive read and noticed that if you are going to be driving within 4-5 mins, then dont turn the truck off. When you crank, the engine would burn more fuel than idleing for 4-5 mins.
What??
 

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I've heard that cranking is equivalent to 45 seconds worth of idling. But I am sure that was an average for gassers. Not sure if it would be more for a diesel...
 

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If you are pulling heavy, it is good to idle for a couple of mins to let things cool down a bit. It is also good to let it idle for a few minutes before you drive off it is pretty cold out. Just letting it idle for a long time is kinda silly with these trucks. If I am switching trailers, loading, etc. and will be driving in a few minutes, I let it idle or sometimes set the high idle. I don't want to replace a starter on mine. It is too much money and too much work. my .02
 

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Interesting comments.
If you are ever at a rail yard, wou will see most diesel locomotives idling for long periods of time.
Is it because they are hard to start being much larger (1200-3000 HP)?
 

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I think the warm up idea came when engines were carburated, they would run ****ty until warmed up but now with fuel inj and computers, no need to idle.
 

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Have you ever seen a locomotive being started when it's cold?? And you thought your truck smoked when it's cold!! It takes a lot of energy to start those babies up. I know some of yard engines will run for years straight. They can do a lot of their maintenence with them running. NORAD always has at least one of their locomotive engines running at all times in case of emergency. (they power very large generators for the compound)
 

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Doesn't the 06 LLY have the elevated idle as well? What triggers it to run at the higher rpm? I fired mine up before work the other morning when it was around 18 degrees and it ran about 650 rpm the whole time (about 10 minutes). I would have expected it to have been humming along since it barely budged the water temp needle in that time. :confused:
 

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Doesn't the 06 LLY have the elevated idle as well? What triggers it to run at the higher rpm? I fired mine up before work the other morning when it was around 18 degrees and it ran about 650 rpm the whole time (about 10 minutes). I would have expected it to have been humming along since it barely budged the water temp needle in that time. :confused:
You have to activate this feature on the DIC with the steering wheel controls. Not sure if you dont have the controls on the wheel check owners manual.
 

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I live about 7 minutes from work,5-6 days a week... Is it bad on the LBZ to let it idle for 5-6 minutes then drive to work when the temp gauge hasnt moved yet? My understanding was it is bad. But i usually let it warm up for a few minutes, since its cold here in PA, the ally shifts hard but thats expected being that cold.. by the time i get to work its flowing heat and the temp gauge is up a bit, i let it idle for 20-30 seconds and shut it off.. am i doing anything wrong?
 

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If its getting real cold, then try plugging in the "block heater" which is really a coolant heater. The hard shifts come from the allison as a way of warming the engine up faster. It happens at the 2-3 and 3-4 shifts. Allowing it to idle for 30 seconds is about right unless you are running it hard before you park, the ideling is mainly to allow the turbo to spool down before cutting it off.
I plug my truck in and the temp is at 170-175 when i get out there in the morning. And another plus- no delay from the glow plugs.
 
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