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Discussion Starter #1
For trading your rear seat and rear seat belts for mine.


I have an 2002 2500HD LT Crew Cab with Tan Leather.


Here's the deal...my wife and I would like to have a 3rd Child. My 2002 has a rear center seat lap belt with no center seat headrest. 2003's have a rear center seat shoulder belt with a very small center headrest.


I'm 99.9999% positive that 2002 and 2003 seats are interchangable.


If you are interested you can email me at [email protected].


My rear seat is in BRAND NEW condition!!! I frequently use leather conditioner and I'm a non-smoker.


Preferably, your seat would be in the same condition as mine.


Thanks!
 

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Be careful if you do this because the cab may have changed slightly to accomodate the extra forces that will be applied to the floor/back panel due to the shoulder belts. You would be suprized at the forces that are applied during a crash. You may want to put your child seat in that position for the first 5 years (which only really need the lap belt if in a Rear Facing Infant, or Forward Facing Child seat), and by the time your new child is old enough, you can get a new truck!!


If you are really not concerned with the floor structure differences, you may want to call Schram's Auto in Waterford, Michigan a call. They have a lot of later model parts, and you may find what you are looking for in time.


Good luck, but I think I'll keep my seat...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the input, but I'm pretty certain that the shoulder belt on the 2003 bolts to the cab at the exact location as the lap belt on the 2002. There is no deference between the 2002 and 2003 except a lap belt vs a shoulder belt and no head rest vs a very small headrest.
 

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You have to remember that your 3rd child will be in a car seat for a least 5 years as mentioned, plus if you use a high back booster seat it teathers to the back of the cab and will give you the protection you need. I have 3 child seats in the rear-their my crew! Good luck.
 

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you have my interest ... I have a 2004 GMC with the tan leather...


What we really need to know is if they are actually the same or not... I'll look at mine to see if it has the center belt or not.





take some pics of yours and I'll do the same...


What about shipping?? that's gotta be the killer...Edited by: Newguy
 

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Packfan,


I might be interested in your offer. Even Better I am in Atlanta so we could meet half way. It would make for a nice drive :)
 

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You didn't get my point... The floor could be structurally stiffer in the 03s due to the additional load that the seat will impose on the cab during a crash. I would bet that the seats would interchange. It's your safety, your conscience. Truly up to you if you are comfortable with it...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Cruzman & newguy,


Email me your email address and phone number, I'll email you my phone number as well.


[email protected]


I need to take some measurements to locate the bolts so we can compare bolt pattern (location). I've done this once before on a 2003, which is how I'm 99.9999999% sure the 2002 and 2003 rear seats are interchangable.


Before we drive all all over the world to meet each other we need to be 100% sure the bolt patterns match.


Plus I would like to see digital pics of your seats, and I'm sure you'd like to see mine.


Thanks!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
nassdmax,


I REALLY appreciate your opinions and suggestions! I'm glad there are some people on the internet that care about the health/safety of complete strangers, especially those in cyberspace.


I suppose it's possible that the floor is slightly different (stiffer) but I doubt it. Subtle changes like that can cost a $100 million.


I'm also a Civil Engineer, and I don't think a shoulder belt would create much different forces than a lap belt in an accident.


Thanks for helping me consider that possibility however.
 

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packfan said:
Thanks for helping me consider that possibility however.

Wow, thats class... I might be able to learn something from this guy!
 

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Your welcome, packfan. I just wanted you to know the potential implications. In the end it's all of your own decisions.


The change could be as simple as a reinforcement "soapdish" under the attachments to the floor, or a bolt size change. Trust me when I say that changes like this, or even on a grander scale like changing form of the floor, wouldn't cost near the amount you have quoted. Simple changes are way less than $1mil, especially cause most of them do not impact the tooling of the fixtures.


For educations sake... Take this crash example. A typical 35mph vehicle crash (like those you see on Dateline) will have a 25g deceleration pulse. That is 25 times the force of gravity (for those non-engineers reading this). The 50th %ile occupant weight is ~170 lbs. During a crash, the occupant will impart 4250 pounds of force that the restraint system has to absorb roughly that amount so as to not harm the occupant. The loads are no different between the lap only and the lap/shoulder belt system, just that they are distributed differently. I do know from looking at the 03 seat there is a ~2x3 bar that transfers force from the rear of the seat (at the hinge) to the front of the seat that is created during loading of the shoulderbelt. Think of the system as a L where at the top of the L the shoulder load is applied to the seat, and the bottom right of the L the force is pulling up, the front tip of the L the force is pushing down. The lap only situation simply pulls up on the corner of that same L (there is no forward running bar from the hinge).


Good luck to you all. That's why we are all here, because of the wealth of knowledge this board allows us to share.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
"The loads are no different between the lap only and the lap/shoulder belt system, just that they are distributed differently. I do know from looking at the 03 seat there is a ~2x3 bar that transfers force from the rear of the seat (at the hinge) to the front of the seat that is created during loading of the shoulderbelt. Think of the system as a L where at the top of the L the shoulder load is applied to the seat, and the bottom right of the L the force is pulling up, the front tip of the L the force is pushing down. The lap only situation simply pulls up on the corner of that same L (there is no forward running bar from the hinge)."


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Absolutely correct, in a frontal collision, the two main forces exerted from the shoulder belt and the 2x3 metal bar, would be an upward (tensile) force on the bolt where the shoulder belt is attached to the floor, and a "Punching" force at the front end of the 2x3 bar, that's trying to punch a hole in the floor. The bar is there to transfer the force from the back of the seat to the front of the bar.


Given that all my kids are 4 and under, the forces generated by their weight is a lot less than what the truck seat, seat belt, bolts, etc. were designed for. Even if I keep the truck 10 years, it shouldn't ever be an issue.


Thanks again, I LOVE nerdy, pocket protector discussions like this!
 

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s-r-us!!!


Later
 
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