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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Are there any aftermarket rims that are hub-centric like the OEM's? All the popular styles I've seen are lug-centric...
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I guess they don't exist...?
 

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They make hub-centric adapters, you find the inner diameter of the aftermarket wheel and the outer diameter of our hubs and then find an adapter. Never had any experience with them but I would not run lug-centric on my truck.
 

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Lug centric is fine...

I've never had a wheel come off, break a stud, vibrate, wobble.

AND I use never-seize on my lugs! :eek:

:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Lug centric is fine...

I've never had a wheel come off, break a stud, vibrate, wobble.

AND I use never-seize on my lugs! :eek:

:cool:
I've never had a problem either- just wondering why the aftermarket rims aren't hub centric. Seems like lots of guys tow heavy with aftermarkets too.
 

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2019 Silverado 3500HD LTZ CC/SB 4x4
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I think most aftermarket wheels are not hub centric because it would make wheels manufacturer specific where with non-hub centric wheels a wheel can fit more than one application across brands. For example, Dodge and GM both have 8x6.5 bolt pattern however the hub sizes (aka center hole) are different diameters. A GM hub centric wheel will not fit a dodge whereas a non-hub centric will. I may have that backwards ...but think the Dodge hub hole is larger ...may be the other way around. You get the idea ...

That said, I know Ultra makes some hub centric wheels but not sure which other models aside from the Magnum are hub centric. I wish all aftermarket wheels were hub centric like the stockers.
 

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This subject is a basket of worms. You can see in this link http://www.eng-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=152939&page=1 that a room full of engineers can't agree on an answer.

I'll spare you the reading and summarize the points that make sense. In order for the hub to actually take any load you have to have ZERO clearance between the wheel center and the hub....of course we don't have zero clearance because we can easily slide the wheel on and off. Sooooooo, the hub cannot be bearing the load without the wheel sliding around and leaving evidence of fretting (technical term for rubbing). Even a few thousands of an inch would leave noticable wear marks.

What is actually going on is the hub centric part of the wheel is just aiding with getting the wheel close to center and allowing the factory to just jam the lug nuts on quickly without slowly bringing up each of the 8 lugs one step at a time. The friction between the hub face and the wheel face is what bears the load.

I offer this advice with no way to prove it other than to point to all the aftermarket wheels and all the factory vehicles offered with lug centric wheels. I my self have NEVER seen the lugs fail from anything other than improper torqueing. I've seen plenty of wheels bent beyond recognition with the lugs still nice and tight.
 

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I have always been under the impression the main advantage of hub centric wheels was that they are much easier to balance due to the wheel fitting so closely around the hub whereas with lug centric wheels there is much more room for getting the wheel mounted off center on the hub in turn causing balance/vibration problems. Actually, until now I didn't realize hub-centric had anything to do with *load bearing* ...
 

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In theory the tapered lug nuts "should" locate the wheel on center every time. In practice, if you don't slowly snug up each lug a little at a time it's very easy to have one lug hang on enough to cause the others to flex when they are tightend in effect allowing you to tighten the wheel down off center. In a factory setting they don't have time to slowly tighten the wheel down, they need to slam the wheels on and get it down the line. This is why the hubcentric wheels are handy, all the alignment except for the last few thousands of an inch is handled by the hub.

I still honestly believe that the load is NOT handled by the hub, only by the friction between the mounting faces.
 

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This subject is a basket of worms. You can see in this link http://www.eng-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=152939&page=1 that a room full of engineers can't agree on an answer.

I'll spare you the reading and summarize the points that make sense. In order for the hub to actually take any load you have to have ZERO clearance between the wheel center and the hub....of course we don't have zero clearance because we can easily slide the wheel on and off. Sooooooo, the hub cannot be bearing the load without the wheel sliding around and leaving evidence of fretting (technical term for rubbing). Even a few thousands of an inch would leave noticable wear marks.

What is actually going on is the hub centric part of the wheel is just aiding with getting the wheel close to center and allowing the factory to just jam the lug nuts on quickly without slowly bringing up each of the 8 lugs one step at a time. The friction between the hub face and the wheel face is what bears the load.

I offer this advice with no way to prove it other than to point to all the aftermarket wheels and all the factory vehicles offered with lug centric wheels. I my self have NEVER seen the lugs fail from anything other than improper torqueing. I've seen plenty of wheels bent beyond recognition with the lugs still nice and tight.
Amen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This subject is a basket of worms. You can see in this link http://www.eng-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=152939&page=1 that a room full of engineers can't agree on an answer.

I'll spare you the reading and summarize the points that make sense. In order for the hub to actually take any load you have to have ZERO clearance between the wheel center and the hub....of course we don't have zero clearance because we can easily slide the wheel on and off. Sooooooo, the hub cannot be bearing the load without the wheel sliding around and leaving evidence of fretting (technical term for rubbing). Even a few thousands of an inch would leave noticable wear marks.

What is actually going on is the hub centric part of the wheel is just aiding with getting the wheel close to center and allowing the factory to just jam the lug nuts on quickly without slowly bringing up each of the 8 lugs one step at a time. The friction between the hub face and the wheel face is what bears the load.

I offer this advice with no way to prove it other than to point to all the aftermarket wheels and all the factory vehicles offered with lug centric wheels. I my self have NEVER seen the lugs fail from anything other than improper torqueing. I've seen plenty of wheels bent beyond recognition with the lugs still nice and tight.
Makes perfect sense to me.
 
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