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Discussion Starter #1
So...I ran into a problem with my plastic hydraulic brake line, for the 100th time in a year. I gave up. I installed a solid metal brake line in place of the two metal lines and plastic line. I hope this will help somebody out. Total cost to me was $18 as I already had everything except the hard line. I also purchased a 1 foot section of tubing and coupler "just in case" and ended up not needing either. I purchased everything at NAPA.

Tools: 1/4" drive ratchet
13 mm socket, deep
10 mm socket, deep
1/2" open end wrench (brake line wrench preferred)
27/64" drill bit
1/2"x20 tap (bottoming tap preferred)
Tap wrench of choice
small hammer
1/8" punch
Drill press with at least a 1/2" chuck
Cold 6 pack of your chosen beverage (Yes, its a tool)

Supplies: Brake fluid
Brake parts cleaner
5/16" Hard brake line of your chosen length with US fittings
Rubber padded steel clamps (Adel Clamps)
self tapping sheet metal screws
Teflon plumbers tape

Prerequisites: You must have a general knowledge of how to use the above listed tools, correctly and safely.
You must have the cast aluminum clutch master and slave cylinders.


First step: Accumulate your tools, supplies. Drink a beer. :)

Second step: Remove your clutch master and slave cylinder.
Do this by removing the cotter pin installed through the roll pins that hold the lines in place, and then punch out the roll pin with a small hammer and 1/8" punch. Next remove the two 13mm nuts that hold the slave cylinder in place, remove the slave cylinder and set it aside. Remove the two 13mm nuts that hold the master cylinder in place, and tap the push rod free of the clutch pedal. Slide the master cylinder forward from under the hood, and set it aside. Remove and set in a very safe place your rubber gaskets from the ends of the lines. They may still be in your cylinders. You need these for later. These gaskets are not, in my experience, procurable by themselves. If you lose them, or they are bad, you will have to go buy a new master and slave cylinder combo. Drink a beer. :)

Third step: Find your routing and get your tubing length and diameter figured out.
I realized after I removed the master and slave cylinder, that the holes that were in the units were the exact same size needed in order to tap them for 1/2"x20 pipe thread, furthermore, if you go larger than 1/2"x20, the material thickness will be so little that it may not hold up over time. This is why I chose 5/16" brake line with US thread fittings. If you want the smaller 3/16" brake line (like the plastic line ID), you will need additional adapters. After having completing this job, you really cant feel much of a difference. It is a little easier to push the pedal, but not enough to be an advantage. It is harder to bleed this size line however, so a smaller line ID may be wanted for that reason alone. I choose a 5 foot length of brake line for my truck. This provided the advantage that I could choose the routing I desired without having so much extra that I had to invent routing (and create potential air pockets). I can route the line behind and under the engine/trans, or I can run the line under the engine with the suspension cross member (I have a 2 wheel drive truck). If you use a 4 foot section of tubing you can still route under the engine, but your bends will be tighter than mine, and fit the profile of the cross member better. If you run a 6 foot section you can route in exactly the same places and bends as stock. If you go for an 8 foot section you can route alongside the radiator to prevent potential brush clearance issues (4x4 guys may consider this). Drink a beer. :)

Fourth step: Drill your holes and tap them.
Drill your holes about 1/8" deeper than what is currently in place. Be really super careful here. If you drill too deep you will NOT have a surface to seal your brake line, and may drill into the cylinder piston area. If you do this, you will need a new cylinder. If you do not drill these holes deeper, you will have leaks due to the roll pin holes. Tap your holes as deep as you can. I only had a standard tap available, a bottoming tap is much preferred. Otherwise you end up having to over torque the brake fittings to get them to seal. When you are done drilling and tapping, clean everything out really well. Any shavings left will cause problems later on. Test fit your line to your cylinders and make sure that when it is tight, the line cannot wiggle or rotate in any direction. Don't forget to place the rubber gasket into the hole when you test fit. This rubber gasket is what is going to actually seal the connection. Drink a beer. :)

Fifth step: Routing your brake line.
Re-install your master cylinder and slave cylinder. Make your first bends by eye and guess work. It doesn't have to be perfect, just good enough to fit in the engine bay approximately where you want it to end up. After your initial bends, route the line approximately where you want it. Put some Teflon tape on the ends of the brake line nuts to help insure a leak free install. Install your rubber gasket into the master cylinder and install your line. Tighten this connection. Now, go through and finalize your line routing. I made all of my bends by hand without a tubing bender. This larger line is really easy to bend without kinking so a bender was not required. Try to keep at least a 1 inch clearance between your line and anything that vibrates/moves so that your line doesn't get chaffed through over time. Secure your line however you wish. I will be installing Adel clamps along my run to keep it form vibrating too much and causing it to fracture later on. ZIP TIES WILL NOT WORK!!! So don't try it. Padded steel clamps are cheap at home depot. Be careful how you secure your line. Remember that the engine/trans moves with torque application, the frame/body doesn't (so don't secure at both sides). After you have your routing finalized and secure, make your connection at the slave cylinder (don't forget the gasket) and tighten the connection. Drink a beer. :)

Sixth step: Bleed your system and enjoy a worry free, hassle free, no leak hydraulic clutch system. :bounce: No more beer, you're driving after all. :)

In the future, I will probably install a brake bleeder into the port that the current hex screw is located. I will then weld the bleed hole closed. I ran out of time this time around.

I hope this post is helpful, sorry I didn't get any "during" photos. I was trying to get the job done as fast as possible before the sun went down and the temps dropped again. And I just plain forgot. :( But here are some pictures of the final install. Please excuse the messy under hood area. Someday Ill get the time to clean her up and make her look good. But she is a work truck, not a show truck.http://www.dieselplace.com//www.pinterest.com/pin/create/extension/
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Followup: After 200 miles

So...Ive found the weak link in this set-up. You need to install a braided steel line/rubber line in-between the master cylinder and the hard line. Otherwise you end up having harmonics play havoc with your clutch pedal at certain RPM's. It just vibrates like crazy and produces a highly annoying sound. But, later on, it very well could brake the line at the fitting. So, when you figure your line length, subtract a foot and add a brake hose. Otherwise, absolutely no issues so far. :clap:
 
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Discussion Starter #3
NAPA P/N:UP 36503 plus a fitting to go from female 1/2"-20 to male 3/8"-24
Hose:$14.57
Fitting:$.69 at Hardware Sales
Or have a custom line made at a hydraulic shop:~$50
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks trailrider. LOL. I couldn't find anything like that before. That would be great for the guys that still have the plastic master/slave combo.

Thanks Freddyack.
 

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Whistle Pigs Are Cool
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So...Ive found the weak link in this set-up. You need to install a braided steel line/rubber line in-between the master cylinder and the hard line. Otherwise you end up having harmonics play havoc with your clutch pedal at certain RPM's. It just vibrates like crazy and produces a highly annoying sound.
I had the same situation with my VDO copper boost line I used from the intake to the gauge pod. I slid some rubber hose, slit lengthwise, over the copper pipe and almost all the resonation was damped and almost no vibrations into the dash.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
I'll try that out and post back what happens. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks kaiser, I'm looking at doing that along with the rubber as suggested. It didn't occur to me until I was working on my cucv. At which point I pretty much laughed at myself for being a dummy.
 
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