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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I wanted to share the attached pics of a home made Belt Tensioner Tool that has worked like a champ for me.

I used an "L" shaped piece of 1/4" steel (came off a garage door opener kit), two socket wrenches, nuts, bolts and spring washers.

The socket wrench in the elbow must fit snugly in the spring housing; the bolt that extends approximately 1/4" helps to keep the tool aligned and in place.

The socket wrench on the right is 13 mm and goes over the pulley retaining nut. You may need to grind the head of the bolt that goes through this socket.

I use a 1/2" breaker bar or ratchet to unload the belt tensioner spring.

NOTE: YOU MUST STRAP THE TOOL TO THE BELT TENSIONER ASSEMBLY TO KEEP IT FROM COMING OFF!!! REMEMBER TO WEAR SAFETY GLASSES!!!
 

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Super Moderator A Country Boy Can Survive...
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i just use a 1/2 in breaker bar to relieve tension on the tensioner if thats what you made. unless this is to remove the tensioner from the engine?
 

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Hello,

I wanted to share the attached pics of a home made Belt Tensioner Tool that has worked like a champ for me.

I used an "L" shaped piece of 1/4" steel (came off a garage door opener kit), two socket wrenches, nuts, bolts and spring washers.

The socket wrench in the elbow must fit snugly in the spring housing; the bolt that extends approximately 1/4" helps to keep the tool aligned and in place.

The socket wrench on the right is 13 mm and goes over the pulley retaining nut. You may need to grind the head of the bolt that goes through this socket.

I use a 1/2" breaker bar or ratchet to unload the belt tensioner spring.

NOTE: YOU MUST STRAP THE TOOL TO THE BELT TENSIONER ASSEMBLY TO KEEP IT FROM COMING OFF!!! REMEMBER TO WEAR SAFETY GLASSES!!!
It looks like an interesting tool. Action photos would be awesome, as I am having trouble visualizing how you would use it.

Thanks,

Rob :)
 

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Very nice--I simply put a bend in an old 1/2 drive breaker bar and put the appropriate socket on it.
 

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1995 GMC Suburban
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18mm socket using a breaker bar to get the tensioner belt to swing to release the tension. When you turn the bar clockwise, it will swing the tensioner and grab the belt out of it. Then slowly swing the bar counter-clockwise so the tensioner does not sling back and break it. At least that is my experience watching somebody changed the alternator once, so that what I have doing.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It looks like an interesting tool. Action photos would be awesome, as I am having trouble visualizing how you would use it.

Thanks,

Rob :)
I have to remove the upper fan shroud and the long black plastic air reservoir that attaches to the turbo intake, and it's raining outside.:(

Sockets towards the engine. Elbow socket into spring housing. End socket over pulley nut. It will look like an arrowhead pointing to your left.

Regards,
Franko
 

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later models have 3/8" drive square hole on tensioner, Lisle makes a tool for older style using ???mm socket (can't remember size been so long since working OBD-I) on flat bar with 1/2" socket drive for easing tension on belt tenrioner so belt can be removed, had to pay for it so free is better
 

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It is genious tool.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
later models have 3/8" drive square hole on tensioner, Lisle makes a tool for older style using ???mm socket (can't remember size been so long since working OBD-I) on flat bar with 1/2" socket drive for easing tension on belt tenrioner so belt can be removed, had to pay for it so free is better
Hello Turbine Doc,

A while back, I saw the 3/8" drive square hole in the belt tensioner of a friend's truck and it was cracked at the outer part of the protrusion from the housing. Scared me enough to come up with the tool for my truck. When I thought about that crack, I also noticed there was quite a bit of wear in the square hole?

Regards,
Franko
 
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