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Discussion Starter #1
so how long will it take to do a head gasket job on a 6.2?????????????????

time wize and cost??

thanks
 

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Depends on a lot of things. An average time for me is around 6-8 hours. Depends on options, A/C, etc. This includes pulling the heads, cleaning the surfaces, tapping the block holes, careful prep work, new gaskets and bolts. It doesn't include problems encountered along the way.

I've spent as much as two days on some jobs. I've seen them done in the driveway and watched the truck sit there, hood up for weeks! Lots of variables.

Cost for parts is usually $200 - $400, again depending on what you find. If you price the stuff for less, good for you. This is just a ballpark figure. Prices vary on the internet. I buy from a local, reputable engine reman shop. I can custom order exactly what I know works best. Watch out for cheap aftermarket parts. You can get bit! I use Fel-Pro gaskets, ARP bolts, Perma-tex Ultra Copper RTV and Loc-tite 518 Anerobic sealer where needed.

Again, do your research, this is just my experience. This site is loaded with talent and experience. From what I read here, if you took this job to an independant repair shop, you could be looking at $2000+ and a dealership could be in the $4000 range.

"The bitterness of poor quality far outlasts the sweetness of low price."
 

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Ditto to what Fred said. A good source for Felpro gaskets and head bolts is northern auto parts, they are mail order and internet and have very reasonable prices. Rock auto is another. Ask lots of questions here from those of us that know and it will save you lots of money and frustration.
 

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im gonna be doin the head gaskets on my 95 6.5 td here in the next week and is it nessarcy to buy new arp bolts or can the old ones be reused i want to do it right but i was plannin on just buyin fel-pro gaskets and using the old parts

and what does fred482 mean by tapping the block holes ive never done this kinda work before thanks im pretty sure that its the same procedure doin head gaskets on a 6.5 vs 6.2 didnt see a reason to start a new thread
 

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The term, "tapping" means cleaning the existing threads, not cutting more threads. Sorry for the confusion. I use a tap to clean the block holes. I guess "chasing" the threads would be a better term.

I also use a 45 degree countersink tool to break the surface around each bolt hole. It's called "chamfering" (sp) the holes. It allows the head to pull down on the block without raising the block surface around the threads. I only cut it about .060 - .080 down into the block. In effect, it lowers the first thread below the deck surface so the bolt isn't pulling it up, lifting the head off the block.
 

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You MUST use new head bolts, unless you want to redo the job:eek: The head bolts are torque to yield and can't be reliably re used. Arp makes new ones as does Fel pro. Felpro's run about 24.00 a set and you will need two sets.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
wwhat do you mean torque to yield ???? is that u just pack them tight as u can get them?
 

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That means they are torqued to the maximum amount they are rated to hold just before they will fail (permanently deform). By fail I do NOT mean they will sever off but rather will simply deform plastically or permanantly.

Metals are elastic to a point (their yeild strength) which means they will deform under stress loads up to their yield and if the stress is released, they will return to their natural state just like an elastic band or rubberband. IF the amount of stress exerted on them is greater than the particular metal's yield strength, it will fail or be permanantly deformed and not go completely back to its natural state. Its maximum yield strength is the point at which the metal will completely fail or sever into two pieces.

That said, I can't imagine this would happen to a head stud unless they were subjected to impact forces that instaniously put astronomical amounts of stress on them. They typically fail by stretching or deforming plastically/permanantly and not going back to their natural state thus not applying enough clamping force on the head gaskets ultimately leading to a leak.

Hopefully that wasn't too confusing.

C-ya
 

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Discussion Starter #9
thanks that is wut I was thinking as well..........................

just wanted to confirm
 

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do you have to torque the bolts to a certain ft # ill be doing the headgaskets this weekend and will need all the info possible dont want to be sitting in front of the computer wating for anwsers

does any one know of a site that has a step by step process on doing head gaskets thanks again
 

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Going with studs tends to be the trend, they provide more clamping force.

As for the torque specs, sorry I can't provide that. Might be a shot in the dark BUT auto parts stores sometimes can offer info like that as can your local GM dealerships.

Best of luck.
 

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Some of the vendors seem to act as if it's a big deal down to the BRAND to use. I don't know myself. Prices can certainly get spendy ($200 IIRC:eek:).

Studs? Sounds interesting, any more opinions on them?
 

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6.2 head bolt torque procedure

My Haynes diesel manual says to torque the heads down progressively with a first pass of 15 foot lbs, then 50 foot lbs and finally turn each bolt an additional 90 degrees. The 17 bolts per head are tightened from the center progressively in both directions.
 

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Torque bolts to 20 ft lbs, then 50, then 50 again, then 90 degrees. Then set torque wrench at about 110 ft lbs and go over them again. The last step is not in any book, just the way I like to do mine. If a bolt doesn't torque, it could indicate a bad bolt. Bolt torque pattern comes with the gaskets in the felpro line.;) Make sure threads in block are chased with a good tap, surfaces are very clean with no oil residue, and I like to run wet dry sandpaper accross the surfaces with a straight edge to flatten and rough up the surface as well as show any imperfections that could lead to another failure. I preffer 100 or 220 wet dry used with some wd 40.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
don't think it is my head gaskets......I presurized the rad with a tester and it held for over 15 minutes then droped a couple pounds.

is it ok??????????????
 

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With gasoline engines I always like to use a exhaust probe(for emission tests). Drive the vehicle to let the tstat cycle and shut it off, pull the cap off the overflow bottle and put the end of the probe in the bottle, not getting the tip wet. This way you can see if there is any hydrocarbons in the cooling system. Works with gassers, should with diesels? Another test is to put your pressure tester on the radiator, do not pump it up and start engine and let idle. If he pressure builds fast and high then there is a head gasket problem. any comments?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
that is a good one for the rad test to see if there is preasure building..I will try later

thanks
 

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does anyone know what size tap is needed to clean out the block holes?

looks like 3/8 thread to me
 

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Discussion Starter #20
probably 7/16 tap like all chevys but I could be wrong
 
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