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Let's take the Truck!
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Discussion Starter #1
Thought I would share my experience with some detail since I couldn't find alot here about it. The press at my work dissapered so I bought this 20 ton on sale for $160 and it works pretty well but as always with China made tools they always leave something to be desired. Cheap steel and something always needs adjustment or modified. If you plan on installing bushings yourself keep a few things in mind. You will need a press, some adapters and some large impact sockets at a minimum. Wear safety glasses, gloves, and steel toes are a must. If an arbor plate falls on your toe you wont be happy:bawl:
 

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Let's take the Truck!
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Discussion Starter #2
I was able to use adapters from my ball joint master adapter kit and from my otc ball joint press. Without adapters I dont see being able to press these bushings. Here's the three sizes needed to press the bushings on the lower arm.

2 3/4" id
2 1/4" id
2" id
 

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Let's take the Truck!
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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I felt no need to heat these or cut the bushings in any way simply take a hammer and chisel to the edges of the bushing where they meet the arm to break the rust seal. This will make the presses job much easier as the bushing pops free the arm. Match a impact socket to the bushing size and set up your press. Make certain everything is aligned properly and centered beneath the press. When you use the hydraulic jack I suggest standing at the side of the press for safety but this is just my opinion. You are actually pressing the arm downward over the bushing which is sitting on top the socket.
 

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Let's take the Truck!
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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
The rear bushing which is larger has a flat side which must be positioned towards the torsion bar hole. Place the bushing and tap it lightly with a small hammer so it will hold here while you set up. Pressing the bushing is quite easy so if you feel too much resistance stop and check your set up. Kind of a pain but rewarding once done. With the arms out of the truck this took about 90 minutes. A second person would surely speed things along:thumb: Not sure what a shop would charge to press these but I like buying tools so more for me and less for them.
 

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R.I.P. Sam
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As always, nice write up :thumb:

Looks like the same press I have, its cheap, but it does the job about once a year. I've actually used it a half dozen times the last few months. If you have a press, save pulled bearings, races and odd shapes of steel, they come in handy for jobs like this.

I think this belongs more in FAQ's than DIY, so I shall make it so.
 

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Great write up!

I see no need to replace Upper Control Arm Bushings (unless upgrading to Poly) when you get the whole UCA Assembly from Rock Auto for $30 Doorman with BJ! Lifetime guarantee
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Ok
Great write up!

I see no need to replace Upper Control Arm Bushings (unless upgrading to Poly) when you get the whole UCA Assembly from Rock Auto for $30 Doorman with BJ! Lifetime guarantee
Thanks for your imput! Dorman uca assemblies are TWICE the price you stated and the quality is average at best. A quality Moog or AC Professional upper ball joint alone will run you $30. I understand your LT warranty standpoint But I would rather buy a quality part that will last as opposed to sending out control arms for warranty when I could be fishing. Hopefully the thread will help some visitors or members when replacing their bushings standard or poly alike as this was the point. Josh
 

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Please, do not think I am challenging or arguing with you. I think your write-up if Great.

$30 was on my 97 K1500 with a 6.5.
The only reason I didn't get Moog was I knew it was not my forever truck as I was craving a CCLB Dually. I really wanted 6.2 or 94 or older 6.5. It seemed like I was chasing a unicorn here in NY. Those that had something remotely close wanted an absurd amount of money. I had to settle for a 96.

I just double checked RA for the Dually and Moog is to the tune of $90 compared $62. Me personally as you suggested I would 110% get the Moog. The only downfall with RA warranty exchange program is that you have to wait for the replacement to come in the mail vs. walking into a store and getting instantaneously or overnight.

You have a nice box in the background! Def do not seem like the typical weekend warrior. Just throwing that out there for other members and visitors.

Is there any reason you chose not to install poly? I hear mixed reviews.
I took my K1500 the next week Upstate where my family has property. Terrain was off the beaten path. With a brand new front end and Monroe Reflex Shocks there was no give in the suspension felt pretty rocky honestly I was disappointed.
 

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I'm confused why I don't see the concentric bushing for adjusting the camber for alignment anywhere in these pics... or is this another reason for me to stop perusing these threads at 2:27 in the morning?!?:eek:
 

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I'm confused why I don't see the concentric bushing for adjusting the camber for alignment anywhere in these pics... or is this another reason for me to stop perusing these threads at 2:27 in the morning?!?:eek:
I think what you are thinking of is just like a washer that goes outside the bushings front and rear.
These trucks actually came from the factory with no provision for alignment of the upper a-arms. There is a special tool that cuts a slot out of just a bolt hole. The 1st alignment was expensive because the a-arm had to be removed to cut the slots. The adjustment cams also had to be purchased.
 

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I think what you are thinking of is just like a washer that goes outside the bushings front and rear.
These trucks actually came from the factory with no provision for alignment of the upper a-arms. There is a special tool that cuts a slot out of just a bolt hole. The 1st alignment was expensive because the a-arm had to be removed to cut the slots. The adjustment cams also had to be purchased.
That's just the way I remember it, bk. After I rebuilt all the suspension in my '93 C2500 I took it for alignment. The fellow that did the job told me he had to torch those slots in the frame upper A arm brackets even though they're crimped at the factory and supposed to come out with a hammer and punch. Said he always has to torch them. If the attached pictures come out, you can see the crimped slot shown in Fig. 4, item 47. That's got to come out. Here's the text that goes with the pictures:

"As originally installed, the upper control arm cannot be adjusted for camber or caster. However, if the camber or caster is measured and found to be out of specification, the camber and caster can be set to proper specifications using adjustment kit 15538596, or equivalent. To install, proceed as follows:

1.Raise and support vehicle and lower control arms, then remove nut (60), washer (61) and bolt (62) from upper control arm bracket (44). Discard nut, washer and bolt.
2.Remove large washers (40), Figs. 3 and 4, which are welded to the upper control arm frame brackets.
3.Remove weld beads from the upper control arm bracket. Grind area smooth.
4.Install adjusting cams (49) to bracket (44).
5.Install bolt (48) and nut (50).
6.Adjust camber and caster to specifications by rotating bolt head. Tighten nuts to specification. See Steering and Suspension/Tires, Wheels and Alignment/Specifications/Mechanical ."
 

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I saw the special "Knock out" tool in the GM manual. Of coarse, it was only available to dealers.
 

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So if the adjustment cam is just a washer sandwiched on either side of a bushing that only has a hole running through the CENTER; how does that adjust while allowing the bushing to seat properly and function?

Never mind, that's where the slot in the control arm comes in...

Yep, I'll wake up.:facepalm:

I'm just amazed that's how it came from factory!!!
 

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No doubt a bean counter decision. They saved a few cents on every one produced and made money selling the kits and tool.
 
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