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FYI - here is GM TSB related to Fuel Additives


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Information on Diesel Fuel Additives #03-06-04-017 - (03/13/2003)

The use of diesel fuel additives is not required or recommended for the 6.5L diesel or the 6.6L Duramax® Diesel engine under normal conditions. The filtering system is designed to block water and contaminants without the use of additives. However, some customers may desire to use fuel additives to improve the characteristics of available diesel fuels.


Water Emulsifiers and Demulsifiers
If the customer desires to use a fuel additive, care must be taken in its selection. There are two common methods that fuel additives use to cope with water in the fuel. One method is through demulsification of water in the fuel. This method causes water particles to combine together to form larger particles, which drop out of suspension. This allows the fuel filter/water separator to separate the water from the fuel as it is designed to. The other method of coping with water in the fuel is through emulsification. This method, often using alcohol as the emulsifier, keeps water particles suspended in the fuel. Emulsification of water in the fuel can allow water to get past the fuel filter/water separator, in most cases causing damage to the fuel system.


Only alcohol free water demulsifiers should be used in General Motors diesel engines. Both *Racor® and *Stanadyne® diesel fuel additives are alcohol free and utilize water demulsifiers to cope with water in the fuel. Other brands may be available in different areas; be sure that they clearly state that they are alcohol free demulsifiers before use.


*We believe these sources and their products to be reliable. General Motors does not endorse, indicate any preference for or assume any responsibility for the products from these firms or for any such items which may be available from other sources.


COMMON DIESEL FUEL CONCERNS
Fuel Waxing/Icing
Fuel distributors blend #1 and #2 diesel fuels for seasonal requirements in a particular region. No other blending of fuels is recommended. However, a customer may desire to use a winter fuel additive to prevent fuel waxing or icing during extreme cold snaps. If a winter fuel additive is to be used, it should not contain alcohol or other water emulsifiers that may compromise the water removal effectiveness of the fuel filtering system.


Bacteria and Fungi Growth
Bacteria and fungi growth can occur in diesel fuel when there is water present, especially during warmer weather. The best prevention against bacteria and fungi growth is to use clean fuel that is free of water. There are diesel fuel biocides available which are designed to kill bacterial growth in the fuel system. However, the dead bacteria can still cause blockages throughout the fuel system. If bacterial growth is found in the fuel system, the proper method of removal is to flush the fuel system using Service Manual procedures, replace the fuel filter element, and refill the tank with clean diesel fuel. If a customer desires to use a biocide after flushing the fuel system, it should not contain alcohol or other water emulsifiers.


Low Cetane Number
The cetane number is one indicator of a diesel fuel's ability to ignite. There are many indicators of overall fuel quality such as cleanliness, specific gravity, volatility, viscosity, detergency, corrosion inhibiting abilities, and lubricity. Increasing the cetane number alone is not a fix for poor quality fuel. Additionally, increasing the cetane number beyond the engine's requirements will not increase performance. However, the cetane number of diesel fuel is not always consistent and some customers may desire to use a cetane improver to ensure full performance of their engine. If such an additive is to be used, it must not contain alcohol or other water emulsifiers.


Poor Lubricity
The 6.5L diesel and the 6.6L Duramax® Diesel engin
 

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Yes, I have seen this TSB and know it by heart.. I can also share a long list of Duramax/6.5TD users who have followed GM''s recommendations of either not using additization or using Racor/Stanadyne diesel fuel additive only to have fuel system warranty denial/corrosion issues as a result. If one does not use an emulsifying fuel additive, free water will settle out of diesel fuel. Anywhere free water settles, corrosion will occur. If one adds a demulsifying agent, even more free water will settle, providing even more corrosion potential.
GM is a production partner with both Stanadyne and Racor. Stanadyne and Racor build water separators. Demulsifiers theoretically enable their water separators to work better. We have seen the fuel analysis results posted here showing clearly that the separators do absolutely nothing with entrained water, either with or without the additives.. Using either additive is like playing Russian Roulette with only one chamber empty.
George Morrison
Edited by: Georgecls
 

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Exactly.. Not required my ass! Diesel fuel treatment helped the original injector pump on my old '97 van (6.5 diesel) go past 500,000 miles.


I'm not taking their word for it, my '02 van gets a splash of treatment with every fill-up, as does my dmax
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Hey George,





Does primrose or any other place make a similair additive for gasoline, i still have a bunch of gas engines that i would not mind adding a litle protection to against water, ETC in my gas engines.





Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Camstyn said:
Exactly.. Not required my ass! Diesel fuel treatment helped the original injector pump on my old '97 van (6.5 diesel) go past 500,000 miles.


I'm not taking their word for it, my '02 van gets a splash of treatment with every fill-up, as does my dmax
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Hey Cam,
Still riding the TM?

Here in the U.S., I don't think GM can recommend any fuel additive. Especially if it is to make the vehicle reliably run to 100k miles without blowing a fuel injector - The EPA would make GM buy that additive for you!!!

What I got out of this bulletin, in priority order, was...

1. GM does state that you will have improved fuel system reliability and longevity if you use an additive to increase lubricity. Being that injectors are very expensive, I will be adding an additive for lubricity on every tank.

2. You don't want any water reaching the injectors - and it doesn't matter if it is in suspension or not. The water will damage the injectors.

Given that I accept this statement from GM - I can't imagine putting a drop of emulsifier in my tank; What if the water trap is half full and then you add a bottle of an additive that has an emulsifier? How quickly would that water be put into "suspension" and hit the injectors? As the water turns to steam, blows the tip off the injector.

3. Stanadyne marketing is really full of it - they say on their website that GM recommends their performance plus additive. I don't see that anywhere in this TSB.

4. I now see why some guys say additive increases mileage and others say it doesn't do anything in this regard. Depends on the quality of the fuel they are buying. So, if I get better mileage running an additive, should I take it as a hint to buy my fuel elsewhere?

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I buy good quality gas from a high volume station - a shell station near my work. But even still, adding an additive to help mitigate damage potentially done by a bad batch of fuel seems like cheap insurance for a very expensive motor.

I run my truck stock and wonder how much "juicing" it affects the reliability of the injectors. The fuel is lubricating and cooling the injectors. The new low sulfur fuels seems to be "on the edge" in terms of supplying the lubricity needed for injectors on the new bosch injection system. If I did juice it - I would run a heavy dose of lubricity additive...

jeffEdited by: dmax lover
 

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dmax lover:


Good post. I've been thinking along the same lines... Oh boy here we go with a good debate


What brand additive are you using? I just bought the Stanadyne.
 

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Dmaxlover...that TSB has been on the boards since September 6.


http://www.dieselplace.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=154&PN=1


We've discussed the issue of de/emulsifying for what seems like forever and have agreed to disagree. I would suggest that you read some of the older threads for some very interesting reading before taking the General's word as the General has been known to BS before.
 

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After reading some of the Primrose material, I'm wondering what is the difference between 405 and 405C. That is, besides a very different mixing ratio. 405 is mixed 1 gal. to 2000 gal. and 405C is 1 gal. to 3000 gal. The Primrose literature looks the same to me
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Still running FPPF Total Power in EVERY ounce of fuel that I burn in EVERY diesel in my stable...
 
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