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Discussion Starter #1
I've been having a problem with my glow plug system on my 86 6.2L. When I turn on the key I hear some rattling coming from the glow plug controller unit and my GP indicator light flashes. Naturally, I thought loose connection somewhere and tracked it down to one of the wires on the temperature sensor. While I was looking at the electrical schematic I noticed that one side of the temperature sensor leads to the controller and the other connects in with the wire providing power to all of the glow plugs. I know the sensor needs to have a path to ground, but why go through the glow plugs? Anyone know?

Also, I was wondering if I could eliminate the Temp Sensor altogether and connect a momentary switch to ground in its place allowing for manual control of the glow plugs? Thanks, Robert
 

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Yes, you can hook it up to a switch. I suspect the controller/relay is defective. I've seen this before and after replacing the unit, I took the old one apart and found the spring that retracts the plunger all rusted and eaten away. The contact disc looked the same. Would not "pull in" and hold contact. The light just flickered and the plugs wouldn't get hot.
 

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could you let me know if you ever figure out how to instal a manual glow plug switch? There are instructions posted on how to do it, but it was for a different system than my '87 has (which is probably the same as yours) and no one could tell me how to do it with mine. I mainly want a manual switch so i don't have to rely on the relay and sensor in case they go bad and leave me stranded somewhere.
thanks,
Paul
 

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I used an old style GM Part #560580 relay. Like the one on the '82-'83 models. Four terminals, two large, copper colored and two small, male spade terminals. Hook the large battery wire from the existing relay controller to one of the large terminals. Hook the glow plug fusible links to the other large terminal. Hook one small spade to a good ground and the other to one side of your manual switch. The other side of the switch goes to an ignition source, usually found at the fuse panel, marked "IGN".

The type of switch is whatever you prefer but, use some type of H.D. "Normally off, Momentary on" switch. I prefer a "Push Button Starter" switch. A momentary toggle switch is also available. Stay away from a light duty electronic "spot switch". Also, stay away from a straight two position toggle switch as it is too easy to leave it on and burn up the plugs.

Hope this helps..
 
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Discussion Starter #5
So I went ahead and modified my GP System to allow for manual control. So far, so good. I've attached a quick schematic of before and after in case anyone might need a reference, or if anyone might have any suggestions. This is my first go-around with this, but just seemed to make sense that it would work this way. So far it is working great and I'm getting power when I want it to the plugs. I'm still not sure why one side of the temp sensor connects to the positive side of the GP's. I'd originally wanted to leave the temp sensor in the system and provide a momentary bypass to ground with a momentary switch. I still this would be a good way to go, but for now I went for the simpler approach of when I hit the button its on and off otherwise.

For the momentary switch I picked up a heavy duty push button starter from a local parts store for around $13. I used 14g wire and connectors.

Per everyone's recommendations I wanted to make sure I had 60G GPs in, but haven't been able to figure out what I have. They are newer plugs so I don't want to replace them if I don't have to. Here is what was scribed on them in case anyone knows: AC Delco 0 100 271 107 and 219 / 10.5V? Thanks. - Robert
 

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Most just bypass the Glow Plug Inhibit switch, resulting in the controller turning on at every key cycle. This way there is no need in the extra wiring, just shunt/short the terminal that would normally connect to the inhibit switch.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I tried this with some test wires and my glow plugs remained on and didn't automatically turn off. Does bypassing the inhibitor with a short affect the time the controller allows the plugs to remain on? I didn't try cranking, will this cause the plugs to remain off?
 

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Per everyone's recommendations I wanted to make sure I had 60G GPs in, but haven't been able to figure out what I have. They are newer plugs so I don't want to replace them if I don't have to. Here is what was scribed on them in case anyone knows: AC Delco 0 100 271 107 and 219 / 10.5V? Thanks. - Robert
I have no idea how to look up such part numbers. my guess its not a 60g type plug since I thought they ran at a full 12volts, while the older ones (9G and 11G) ran at like 10.5volts or even 9volts I thought. a true AC Delco 60G glow plug should just be marked just that, AC 60G.
 

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Fred 482!
I was with you till "the other side of the switch goes to an ignition source".
Is that cause I'm working on the '83 system? Or lack of imagination on my part as to what is where?!
Ta.
 

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I used an old style GM Part #560580 relay. Like the one on the '82-'83 models. Four terminals, two large, copper colored and two small, male spade terminals. Hook the large battery wire from the existing relay controller to one of the large terminals. Hook the glow plug fusible links to the other large terminal. Hook one small spade to a good ground and the other to one side of your manual switch. The other side of the switch goes to an ignition source, usually found at the fuse panel, marked "IGN".

The type of switch is whatever you prefer but, use some type of H.D. "Normally off, Momentary on" switch. I prefer a "Push Button Starter" switch. A momentary toggle switch is also available. Stay away from a light duty electronic "spot switch". Also, stay away from a straight two position toggle switch as it is too easy to leave it on and burn up the plugs.

Hope this helps..
Fred 482!
I was with you till "the other side of the switch goes to an ignition source".
Is that cause I'm working on the '83 system? Or lack of imagination on my part as to what is where?!
Ta.
Fred482 is referring to the momentary switch used to power the solenoid, it supplies the 12volt signal to the solenoid to close the contacts and allow battery power to the glow plugs. one side of the momentary switch goes to the solenoid, the other side of the switch needs a 12volt "hot" source, that 12v source can either be a switched 12v(only hot with key in "on" position) or constant "hot" 12v.
 

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The 83 is a different system than the diagram above in reply #5. Yours should have a 6? pin module that stands up out of the intake. Originals were an all electro mechanical device that used several thermal switches. Later versions had some electronics but it was still housed in that tall bolt looking thing. That was the control section then there was what looks like a Ford starter solenoid that actually did the HD power switching.

The above system the module and solenoid are one assembly. Some people do convert to this if you want an auto system. That was used on 86 to 93 6.2 and 6.5's so its usually a stock item for most parts stores. If you are just doing manual you can use the existing Ford solenoid.
 

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The 82-83 system is easy to make manual, unplug the wires going this solenoid on the fender and run a wire to ground and the other wire to a push button switch then the other side of the switch to a 12v power source.

In my pic, the blue wire is going to ground and the light green one goes to the switch in the cab.

 
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