Diesel Place banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone. Thanks for reading and any help. I can change bolts but am terrible at diagnosing and if your able to explain things very simply I may be able to figure this out and fix it.

I have a 1983 Chevy k10 6.2 that I recently picked up and have already replaced the starter, and batterys. I now have gotten it to crank after messing with a bunch of wires but it doesn’t start. I know the truck hasn’t run in at least a year. Maybe longer.

I cracked the filter on the firewall on the passenger side, and had some fuel come out of the top after a few bubbles, but then was constant fuel.

I then preceded to crack a injector(one close to the IP)which had no pressure or fuel after a bunch of cranking.

after that I looked at the filter behind the IP behind the manifold, I found the out line and cranked it, alittle fuel came out but not a lot. It was hard to check by myself.

I wondering what my next step should be. I only have a Mechanical lift pump, and I know a electric pump helps a lot, but if it’s something help and I can save a few bucks I’d love that.

does this sound like a Lp or a IP problem? What to check?

thanks again for any help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,129 Posts
You off to a good start, verifying clean sufficient fuel supply is generally the first step in diagnosing a no start condition. I would check for a "hot wire" to the shut off solenoid at the IP, with the key on, remove the ESO wire and tap the spade connector, listening for the shut-off solenoid to snap closed when you apply voltage. If the IP is getting fuel supply and power to the ESO but isn't delivering fuel, then something is wrong internally. After sitting for over a year, I would suspect a stuck metering valve or pumping plunger could be the issue. This new fuel they're making doesn't store well at all and breaks down leaving a sticky varnishy residue.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,473 Posts
Welcome to DieselPlace
I would also install a piece of clear fuel line on the return side of the IP to help locate any air in fuel gremlins.
When you replaced the starter I hope you reinstalled the starter support bracket? That bracket is very important!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You off to a good start, verifying clean sufficient fuel supply is generally the first step in diagnosing a no start condition. I would check for a "hot wire" to the shut off solenoid at the IP, with the key on, remove the ESO wire and tap the spade connector, listening for the shut-off solenoid to snap closed when you apply voltage. If the IP is getting fuel supply and power to the ESO but isn't delivering fuel, then something is wrong internally. After sitting for over a year, I would suspect a stuck metering valve or pumping plunger could be the issue. This new fuel they're making doesn't store well at all and breaks down leaving a sticky varnishy residue.
I have removed the pink wire and listened for the clicks which does happen.
In terms of the stuck metering valve or pump plunger, how does one go about cleaning those? Is it just as easy as removing the top of the IP and cleaning a few areas? Any details would be helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Welcome to DieselPlace
I would also install a piece of clear fuel line on the return side of the IP to help locate any air in fuel gremlins.
When you replaced the starter I hope you reinstalled the starter support bracket? That bracket is very important!
That is something no my list to do.

yea I installed a gear reduction starter, and put the new bracket in and everything. I’ve heard to many horrible story’s on that little bracket lolz
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,129 Posts
I have removed the pink wire and listened for the clicks which does happen.
In terms of the stuck metering valve or pump plunger, how does one go about cleaning those?
The metering valve, you might be able to free up yourself if it is stuck. But I can't recommend for you to attempt to free the pumping plungers on your own. That would require completely dismantling the injection pump.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The metering valve, you might be able to free up yourself if it is stuck. But I can't recommend for you to attempt to free the pumping plungers on your own. That would require completely dismantling the injection pump.
Where is the metering valve located?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,129 Posts
Where is the metering valve located?
When you remove the pump top cover and empty the fuel inside, you will see this...
639387

At the rear of the governor housing, behind the throttle shaft, under the guide stud is a black lever with a light spring. The arm should move back and forth freely, and if you push it down, the light spring should easily pull it back up. If its stuck, you can spray brake cleaner or something similar at it and work it back and for until its free. Don't pry too hard or you could break the metering valve or arm.
639388

Best case scenario, the pump is clean inside and the metering valve is sticky and you manage to free it up. If you open the cover and you see rust or varnish inside, well, might as well remove the pump and plan on getting it professionally repaired.
I can make some recommendations if it come to that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
When you remove the pump top cover and empty the fuel inside, you will see this...
View attachment 639387
At the rear of the governor housing, behind the throttle shaft, under the guide stud is a black lever with a light spring. The arm should move back and forth freely, and if you push it down, the light spring should easily pull it back up. If its stuck, you can spray brake cleaner or something similar at it and work it back and for until its free. Don't pry too hard or you could break the metering valve or arm.
View attachment 639388
Best case scenario, the pump is clean inside and the metering valve is sticky and you manage to free it up. If you open the cover and you see rust or varnish inside, well, might as well remove the pump and plan on getting it professionally repaired.
I can make some recommendations if it come to that.
So I finally had time to open up the IP and this is what it looks like, there is alittle play with the spring and metering valve. The fuel seemed clean so I pulled it out. I tthen started to turn the motor over and the IP filled with fuel, but still no fuel to the injectors. Personally, this would make me feel like the IP is maybe clogged or not pushing fuel? Is there another test I could do to check?
 

Attachments

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,473 Posts
So I finally had time to open up the IP and this is what it looks like, there is alittle play with the spring and metering valve. The fuel seemed clean so I pulled it out. I tthen started to turn the motor over and the IP filled with fuel, but still no fuel to the injectors. Personally, this would make me feel like the IP is maybe clogged or not pushing fuel? Is there another test I could do to check?
With the IP dry you have air in place of fuel. I would remove the glow plugs and crank the engine for 10 seconds then let the starter cool for 5 minutes ( repeat till you see a fuel fog coming from the glow plug holes). Then reinstall the glow plugs.
This will help purge the air out of the fuel system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
With the IP dry you have air in place of fuel. I would remove the glow plugs and crank the engine for 10 seconds then let the starter cool for 5 minutes ( repeat till you see a fuel fog coming from the glow plug holes). Then reinstall the glow plugs.
This will help purge the air out of the fuel system.
Do you think I need to remove all of them? Or can I remove a couple?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,473 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
To do it right I would remove them all.
I removed all of them, and saw a light smokeish stuff come out of the glow plugs in pattern that would probably be the firing order when I would crank the motor. What would be your next step?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,473 Posts
I removed all of them, and saw a light smokeish stuff come out of the glow plugs in pattern that would probably be the firing order when I would crank the motor. What would be your next step?
Once you start seeing a fuel fog coming from the glow plug holes then you should be primed. Reinstall the glow plugs and then attempt to start
 
  • Like
Reactions: Texas Diesel Guy

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,473 Posts
Thanks for the help! I got it to start! Now just needs some maintence then ready to roll!
Glad you got it started.
Thanks for the update!
(y)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,789 Posts
Good to hear! I always recommend folks pull the glow plugs to prime as well. Hopeful you're truck is on the road soon!
 
  • Like
Reactions: OkDually
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top