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I am new to the Diesel p/u world, and have been reading about aftermarket fuel filters and fuel heaters such as the Racor unit. While I understand the benefit of additional filtration, is the heater really needed? Do people running the stock setup have problems in Cold weather climates??


Thank You!Edited by: sammy
 

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I think the only time you would have any trouble would be if you had it mounted on the frame where its more exposed and you lived in a real cold area, what happens is the water that gets trapped in the filter would freeze, there for stopping the flow of fuel, I know if I lived anywhere that seen harsh winters I would go with the one with the heater.
 

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IMHO, Keystonekid is right.


But since I bought the "Official" Racor kit and it's frame mounted, I figured that even if it only saved you once it would be worth it. It does occasionally get really cold around here, and the stations usually do some adds to the fuel for cold weather, based on what the temps normally run. But my bigger concern would be if I happen to head North during the winter. One of the members in Wyoming had problems with his set up getting too cold and he said it was a gel problem, but H20 would definitely aggravate that possibility.


If you get the Racor kit itself, it only comes with the heater and WIF, if you get the Racor stuff that Landyut puts out, you have the option of getting whatever you want. It's also less money from him, but I got the Racor since word is that it's GM approved (there's not been any confirmation on that) and my Service Manager is kind of a butt head. I didn't want to give him any excuse to cause problems for me, so I showed him the Racor bulletin and the kit when it came in and he said it looked like a good idea.


Gee, I'm so glad he approves......



I've got to get me another GMC service department to patronize...Edited by: Zeeb
 

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I run a small APU (jet engine) on my filter. I like to keep it real hot. But I live in Kalifornia. You may find the guys in colder climates using full size jet engines.

Have you tried just turning on your discombobulated fragistat? It might help keep your fuel particulized and it will traverse the injector gears better.
 

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If you live in or visit cold climates and use a good additive 99% of the time you will not need a heater. That 1% could be a real bummer though. Your choice...Heater or a big bag of warm clothes and boots.


Steve
 

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What would be the average ambient temperature, that you guys would consider this being a smart move?





I'm getting ready to move to alaska and wondering if it's worth my time.
 

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No flame but, what is the difference between a frame mounted fuel filter and the fuel tank?? I only ask as no one seems to be concerned about the fuel tank which is also in the "air path" while driving down the road. I have not had any problems with my pre oem CAT filter setup from Nick down to -2 F. While I am sure it is MUCH colder in Alaska and Canada, my first question still stands...


Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #9
problemchild said:
I run a small APU (jet engine) on my filter. I like to keep it real hot. But I live in Kalifornia. You may find the guys in colder climates using full size jet engines.

Have you tried just turning on your discombobulated fragistat? It might help keep your fuel particulized and it will traverse the injector gears better.

The discombobulated fragistat? Is that anywhere in the area of the Muffler Bearings, or is it closer to the Injector Gears?
 

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As stated above, the issue is not so much the fuel gelling, but the water trapped in the fuel filter freezing at 32F or below. I've heard of water crystallizing on the filter and completely clogging up a filter. Who cares if the water in the fuel tank freezes so long as it doesn't freeze at the tank outlet. When the filter freezes, though, the fuel stops flowing.
 

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sammy said:
I am new to the Diesel p/u world, and have been reading about aftermarket fuel filters and fuel heaters such as the Racor unit. While I understand the benefit of additional filtration, is the heater really needed? Do people running the stock setup have problems in Cold weather climates??


Thank You!


<DIV>This is my own personal opinion so here goes,</DIV>
<DIV>I think if you live in an area that gets cold enough for blended fuel you should have a heater in your filter. The extra cost isn't much, and if you need the heater it is priceless.</DIV>
 

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I agree with John R, if you need(ed) it, it dont matter how much more it cost, and its not more then a few bottles of additve to get it in the first place, or would a better comparison be its cheaper then a tow bill?
 

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I’d sure like to find a heated head for the CAT filters. I agree with the arguments that its not needed 99% of the time, but there is that 1% where it might be nice to have. I’d connect a switch so that the heater does not run unnecessarily. If anyone has ideas for a heated CAT head, please post them.
 

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SpoolinTurbo said:
...I'm getting ready to move to alaska and wondering if it's worth my time.

In a word, YES! You're likely to see below freezing no matter where you are up here. In south-central, Anchorage area, you can see 20 to 40 below. Up in the interior that will drop to 50 to 70 below. The panhandle is the only area without extreme cold.
 

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4x4man said:
No flame but, what is the difference between a frame mounted fuel filter and the fuel tank?? I only ask as no one seems to be concerned about the fuel tank which is also in the "air path" while driving down the road. I have not had any problems with my pre oem CAT filter setup from Nick down to -2 F. While I am sure it is MUCH colder in Alaska and Canada, my first question still stands...


Bob

You raise a good point. In VERY cold conditions, heat in the tank could also be "priceless" in the event the fuel there started to gel or anywater in fuel froze, blocking or constricting the fuel intake. Under those conditions, you want heat from one end of the fuel system to the other. Also insulation of fuel lines. BTW, If you run a biodiesel blend, "arctic" conditions occur at higher temps.


There don't seem to be ready-made tank heating kits out there for light trucks; heavy trucks offer tank heaters as OEM options for extreme cold. Arctic Fox Inc http://www.arctic-fox.com/ offers a wide variety of fuel heating equipment and seems to be helpful. Other companies such as Webb also offer in-tank heaters for Class 8 and similar trucks. There are in-tank heaters that use engine coolant, electrically heated fuel lines and other products to go with heated fuel filters. All depends on how extreme the cold is, how bulletproof you want to get and how much money you want to /can spend.
 

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I have seen a kit that is glued to the oil pan. I think I saw it here on the forum...Hoot was it you that has this..used blue adhesive to hold it on? Anyways, it is basically a pad that when plugged in keeps the oil warm. I have also seen this type of kit for the external water tanks for RVs. I don't see why one of these type kits would not work for the fuel tank. Something to think about.


JPEdited by: Heartbeat Hauler
 

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Heartbeat Hauler said:
I have seen a kit that is glued to the oil pan. I think I saw it here on the forum...Hoot was it you that has this..used blue adhesive to hold it on? Anyways, it is basically a pad that when plugged in keeps the oil warm. I have also seen this type of kit for the external water tanks for RVs. I don't see why one of these type kits would not work for the fuel tank. Something to think about.


JP

All you will need is a very long extension cord.
 

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Rather than use the oil pan heaters, I would use a battery heater. The battery pads are a lower wattage than the oil pan heaters. I would be worried about too much heat on that plastic tank. BTW, the oil pan heaters work quite well on trannys also.
 

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I have been in -35 F with my pre CAT without heat and so far it hasn't been a problem. I mix in FPPF Total power @ 1 ounce per 5 gallons during the winter months which should help. I think the biggest threat of freezing will be from collected water. This has been somewhat common with heavy equipment that I have used. And yes these problems occur downstream of the water separators seemingly as often as upstream.


I'm not suggesting that you shouldn't heat your filter, maybe I should. Just sharing my experience. --SS
 
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