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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Armed with confidence that I could change my fuel filters, I went to the auto parts store this am.

I had a plan; Take them off one at a time, clean area, fill with fuel, screw on, start truck.

I ran into my mechanic, who evidently thinks my truck is Satan. He said (with his eyes bugged out) , “You can’t do that yourself, what if it won’t start for you?…..…and it won’t…….…you’ll be up the creek without a paddle”
Then he ran out the door.


Are my chances of success that low? Should I just take it to a garage?

It starts and runs great right now, and I don’t want to push my luck. If it wasn’t for that stupid WIF light, I would forget it


P.S. I have never changed the PCV valve. Is that something I should do, and are there any special instructions?
 

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Uhh... It was easy enough for me to change out the fuel filters. :confused:

The Primary filter is easy, since its right on the firewall. The secondary filter is a bit more annoying to get at; its mounted on the back of the intake manifold and you have to remove the filter mount (2 bolts thru the bracket into the intake manifold casting) and fuel lines (flare nuts) to get it out.

When you put them back in, make sure you fill them both full of fuel before you put them in. I think I followed the Haynes diesel engine manual when I did mine. I don't recall having any problems with the proceedure (just the prior owner used vice grips to get the flare nuts off, making one of them fubar...so use a wrench, not vice grips)
 

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Eagle Eyes
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You CAN do it yourself. its not that big of a deal....its even easier since your filling them with fuel before starting! I dont fill mine with fuel and i still get it to start!

make sure the truck batteries are fully charged. i find if you warm the truck up before doing it...youre not fighting a cold engine and air at the same time....once started give moderate throttle to work the air out.
 

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I think your mechanic is looking for some more $$ from you. One of the above posters said exactly what to do. It's not rocket science. As for you PCV valve that will be on the top of your manifold with a hose plugged into it. Pretty simple to change just pull off the hose and pull out of the manifold. If there is some crud built up on it you can replace or use some carb cleaner to clean it off to save some money.
 

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Pcv

Typically a PCV is used on gas engines but not diesels. My '84 6.2 has a Crankase Depression Regulator (CDR) cannister located beside the oil fill for crankcase ventilation. A tube runs from oil fill tube to CDR and then to the intake. Periodic cleaning is recommended.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I think your mechanic is looking for some more $$ from you.
If it were anyone but him I would agree. He has tons of work, builds old race cars, and never stops talking about his soon to be retirement.

I’ll let you know if I build up the courage again to give it a shot.
 

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You can do it. Some guys have the attitude that a gal can't work on a truck. Just BS if you ask me. Heck there's another gal on here (Jenn) who replaced an entire engine.
 

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Yep. Replacing fuel filters is down right easy. If it won't start when you're done, so be it. You'll be all right so long as you've got a bicycle pump...

78chev6.2 is correct. The 6.2 is equipped not with a PCV valve, but a CDR. These are supposed to be periodically cleaned, but nobody does it on schedule... I'm pretty sure the recommended interval is about 30K miles.
 

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you can do it! Way Back When I Was In High School, We Had A Girl In My Auto Mech Class. Alot OF GUYS Talked Crap, Till She Showed She COULD DO Just About Anything They Could Do And In Some Cases Better!!I Was Smart Enough To Pick Her As My Shop Partner.. Damn I Should Have Married Her !wonder what ever happened???
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You'll be all right so long as you've got a bicycle pump...
Please explain that. I imagine it’s to get air out, but how? I’d feel better attempting this, if I knew what to do if I ran into a problem.
 

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Eagle Eyes
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It would be great if you have a vise. I had a hard time grabbing the filter head and turning the filter. I didn't have a vise at the time so I bolted the assembly to a spare wheel and turned the filter with a filter wrench. Worked great.
 

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Please explain that. I imagine it’s to get air out, but how? I’d feel better attempting this, if I knew what to do if I ran into a problem.
It's my favorite method for removing air from the fuel lines. You won't have to do it, though. It's really best suited for later model trucks like mine, and isn't really necessary when you fill the filters with fuel.

Remove the return line on the IP, hook up the air line to that, unhook the fuel line at the point you want to bleed to (i.e., after the fuel filter) put a cup under it, and run the pressure up to 3-5 psi. Maintain that pressure until fuel starts running into the cup. With some pressure still applied, put the line back on. Then put everything back together. It may still take some cranking to get it started as there will still be a small amount of residual air in the lines.

It's quite simple to do if necessary, but as TFLundy noted cranking the engine works as well. I personally have had better luck using air pressure, because I get rather impatient waiting for the starter to cool down and the batteries to charge up when I do the cranking procedure.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Good News-- I changed the fuel filters today, and she started right up.:bounce:
I am grateful for your encouragement…..(and my faithful practice of yoga).
The secondary was extremely challenging.


Bad News--- The friggin WIF light is still on.:confuzeld I really believe it is defective, because if
there had actually been water in the fuel all this time, wouldn’t the engine
tell me something was up? It just hums so pretty. Thanks and :beerchug:
 

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Damn, this grey hair must be something to do with having trouble remembering. Anyway, got to thinking and the 83's water in fuel sensor is in the fuel tank. There should also be a water drain on the frame rail somewhere. It is a small valve with a nipple on it. The best way is to attach a small piece of hose to this valve and open the valve and then use some air pressure to the fuel tank to get the water to drain from the bottom of the fuel tank. If no water comes out of the drain and just clean fuel, then the sensor is bad. Drain should be on the frame rail in the rear somewhere, sorry I can't remember exactly where. GM did away with the water drain in 84, so it was only in use for 2 years.

Back to your fuel filters, good job. Just to clear things up a little, the first filter is actually a water separator, the fuel pump sucks through this filter and this is why this filter must be filled with fuel. It has a drain on the bottom that water can be drained from, but then the filter must be removed and filled back up. The second filter is pressure fed and can actually be put on with no fuel in it and with the pink wire disconnected from the injection pump so that the engine won't start, the engine can be cranked over until fuel squirts from the outlet line on the filter housing(must be left loose), tighten it up and reconnect the pink wire and you are off.

But the way you did it works too, since you got it running. Congrats!:cool2:
 

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Way to go! We knew you could do it. If you ever have any more questions don't be afraid to ask.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
If you ever have any more questions don't be afraid to ask.
I have more questions, than Carter has pills. ( an old saying my gramma used)
 

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Discussion Starter #18
There should also be a water drain on the frame rail somewhere. It is a small valve with a nipple on it. The best way is to attach a small piece of hose to this valve and open the valve and then use some air pressure to the fuel tank

My Chiltons says I have a built-in siphoning system, starting at the fuel tank and going to the rear spring hanger, or at the midway point of right( does that mean passenger side?) frame rail on other models which permits a hose to be attached.

I cant find it. I see big tank, leaf springs, frame. Is it a metal tube I’m looking for?

“Air pressure to fuel tank”???? How? A plunger on the fill hole? Don’t laugh…...It’s the only thing I could think of.


While looking under there , I noticed a shock absorber not attached( top part) to frame…no bolt. It is just laying there snuggled between spring and exhaust pipe.
It has probably been like that a long time.

I should just stop looking…..cause I keep finding problems. Maybe ignorance is bliss.:banghead:
 

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Eagle Eyes
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“Air pressure to fuel tank”???? How?


the only outside part should be a drain valve. the rest of the tubing and stuff is in the inside of bottom of the tank. fuel floats on water, so water sinks to the bottom of the tank and for the most part stays seperated. the fuel pickup line inside the tank is just above this water area. when the water gets too high that it might be picked up into the line, the WIF light comes on. at least thats how I remember it.

most just take an air compressor and cup the fuel fill area with their hand with the air hose in the middle and apply a low amount of air pressure. anything high and stuff will blow up. probably a 2 person job.

While looking under there , I noticed a shock absorber not attached( top part) to frame…no bolt. It is just laying there snuggled between spring and exhaust pipe. It has probably been like that a long time.
pretty common thing. also common is it working itself loose and over time wearing a oval shaped hole into the frame. then no way to attached a bolt to it since the hole is too big. a fix is welding a plate on top and then having a new hole. seems to happen especially on the front end. the K series trucks, 4x4, on the front have an actual shock mount. seems to have fixed that problem, but all C series 2x4 trucks still have it just bolted to the frame, no bracket.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
the only outside part should be a drain valve.

Is that on the fuel tank? I can't find it, and there really isn't much stuff in the back.
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So, the shock absorber can wait awhile without any serious ramifications, Eh?
 
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