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This is a repeat of something I just posted in 'High Mileage Trucks' - a thread I started where I'm posting info I get from our CAA tow truck drivers (same as the US AAA).


This driver I spoke to this morning said they just heard back from GM [they have ~18 trucks all with Duramaxs all but one experiencing one or multiple instances of injector problems] and that after close analysis of this last failure they've found that the injector was blocked [not damaged, just clogged] by a tiny piece of paper they believe comes from the fuel filter.


I'm going to try and get a confirmation from someone in the CAA offices, but if this is true and turns out to be a source of injector issues, then pre OEM filters won't help. The only way to prevent this would be with a post OEM solution [or a better filter in the first place]


Wouldn't that be a strange twist if it wasn't the fuel at all but rather the OEM filter??


Edit - I should mention that GM has requested that the CAA change their filters monthly from this point on.Edited by: EnerMax
 

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You can be sure we'll be watching this one. Thanks for the info.
 

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Wouldn't changing them more often increase the chance manufacturing debris to be introduced into the system???? You would think at 22,000psi the paper would be forced though the nozzle. Just my $.02.
 

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I don't think that we are looking at that kind of pressure at the fuel fitler itself (22,000 psi?).
 

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I hope that paper is not actually that flakey corrosion we saw on the Head gasket RnR pictorial?
 

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I can see it now ... a post OEM filter built specifically for filtering paper particles from the OEM filter.
 

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Assuming this isn't another flawed Racor filter, George M stated before, sharp metal and rust particles before the OEM fuel filter impacts the paper element. This may be the best reason to get ourselves filter magnets.
 

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Another reason to run high quality ceramic filters......
 

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Not to boubt what you say, but this sounds kinda fishy.I would not dare buy a fuel filter from the dealer because of price alone. I have worked in 3 major carriers shops and we used alot of the Napa filters made by Wix that sees fuel from all over. I feel it is a good filter and use the Rotella DFA additave;always fill the tank so if a problem arises it will be narrowed down to a particular station in the case of being a contamination issue. Just my thoughts an a heavily discussed issue. Esmo.
 

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I'm skeptical that this would be "THE" biggest reason for the bulk of injector failures.

Unless there was some type of issue with filter media during a long production run cause Racor has been making and testing filters for a long long time and more than likely knows what holds up and what does not. Filter media breakdown would be a number one criteriea in media selection.

First they would have to find the clogging in multiple cases. Then they need to trace the material to the filter media.

Again... we'll just have to wait. Personally I think one injector going bad sets up a domino effect when a tech takes everything apart, not understanding the corrosion issues in the fuel feed lines. When time is an issue (flat rate) and money is to be made, things tend to get put together rather quickly. Edited by: hoot
 

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Yea I agree. I bet it had something to do with a bad load of fuel maybe causing rust. I don't know, maybe the fleet stores their own diesel tanks and the water content went awry. Multiple injector failures on a truck isn't a surpise with what we've recently learned about corrosion and maintence procedures, multiple failures in a small truck fleet is very surprising.Edited by: Ray403Dmax
 

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Anyone know how paper from the filter can get into the fuel to block an injector?
 

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jeephauler said:
Anyone know how paper from the filter can get into the fuel to block an injector?
Very easily. The fuel goes through the "paper" filter. Possibly the filter paper fibers could become loose and let go on the clean side....
 

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Water in diesel pools or collects in the tank of fuel, causing all sort of bad stuff, including microbial growth as well as rust. Rust and metal particles could detach moving into the filter paper media and over time break through. I was always concerned about dirt passing through the broken down media and never considered the paper could in turn break free. But I guess crazier things can happen.


I suppose the media break down it could also be caused by a chemical or additive. It's a clear path from the filter media's clean side to the injectors.
 

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You would think 23000 PSI would blow just about anything through?
 

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tophog said:
Regarding rust in our fuel tanks ... aren't the fuel tanks plastic?

That's true, but fueling stations and fuel tankers have lots of metal.


It would be nice to hear George M again on this topic. IIRC, he advices additive usage as our fuel systems have metals within them that can also rust from water build-up.


I hope all is well with George.
 

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These canadian AAA trucks probably spend most of their time idling; I know if I were in that cold of weather - the truck would be running and heater on full blast for my entire shift... I would find out how many hours they have on them before you draw any conclusions.

Someone else here mentioned that they use 300-350 hours running time as a ballpark for changing out the fuel filter. For these guys - this is probably once a month (which is what GM recommended).

I noticed on another board that a "hot-shot" guy had 230,000 miles on his truck before first injector issue -> he lived in florida. "CaptainMal" who ran around large trailers (extremely extreme service) - had problems at 130k miles; Maybe florida guy had straight #2, and CaptainMal got blended fuel in wintertime (with less lubricity).

I think that fuel lubricity is possibly the primary factor related to injector longevity (not filtration). Most on this board use FPPF total power - looking at lubricity test results on stanadyne's website - I am not sure the standard FPPF products don't do much to enhance the lubricity of fuel; It looks like they do sell other "... plus lubricity" products that would do much better in this regard.

I am running stanadyne's "lubricity formula" and will be running it year round - it is relatively inexpensive. (nothing in it to deal with water - so no emulsify versus demulsify arguments necessary). It states it add lubricity that is needed when running blended fuels or #1 , etc. This is definitely the case with these Canadian AAA trucks.

You previously said one of these trucks had used an additive and had no issues - which additive was used???

thanks,
jeff
 

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I think that fuel lubricity is possibly the primary factor related to injector longevity (not filtration). Most on this board use FPPF total power - looking at lubricity test results on stanadyne's website - I am not sure the standard FPPF products don't do much to enhance the lubricity of fuel; It looks like they do sell other "... plus lubricity" products that would do much better in this regard


Just read the document you mention on Stanadyne's website. Unfortunately the test results are for Polar Power, not Total Power. The document that I read is at this link:


http://www.stanadyne.com/dsg/showfile.asp?id=1156


Are we talking the same document?


I went to the FPPF website and looked up Polar Power. It does not mention anything about a lubricity additive being part of the product. So the test results are correct from that respect. On the other hand, Total Power does mention a lubricity additive is included. It also mentions that Total Power meets the ASTM BOCLE spec for lubricitity (now we need to figure out what that is).


http://www.fppf.com/catDieselPT.html


From what I have read over the last year and a half, both lubricity of the fuel and the particle level in the fuel contribute to wear.Edited by: OC_DMAX
 

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Thanks...


I agree with what you say - fuel quality (lubricity + cleanliness). Conversations here tend to focus on cleanliness. There are different ASTM BOCLE tests - as long as it meets some measure it's good...


You might find something here on wear tests..


http://www.chevron.com/prodserv/fuels/bulletin/diesel/L1_toc_fs.htmt


For what it's worth - I asked captainmal a couple of questions about how he used his truck and additives, etc. He ran howes - it didn't perform well in stanadyne test that you posted reference to.


jeff
 
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