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Does anyone leave their block heater plugged in as the truck is warming up in the morning? Anyone know if this harms anything?
 

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Pick said:
Does anyone leave their block heater plugged in as the truck is warming up in the morning? Anyone know if this harms anything?

It wont help as the block heater has already heated the coolant to it's maximum tempature ....


Mac
 

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The manual states to unplug the coolant heater before starting the engine. Since it is a maxium operating temperature, it does no good to leave it plugged in. I can't imagine it being good on the charging system either.
 

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Use block heater for 3-4 hours. Unplug heater. Start truck. Let idle for 30 seconds. Drive. No faster warm up available. Second choice. Run high idle for 5 minutes. Drive. You can pull your truck down into a lower gear ang keep the RPM's around 2500. I have even jumped right in my truck before and fired it up,let it idle for 30 seconds and then driven in a lower gear . (30 degrees and above only) This helps a bunch. If Diesel are as undestructable as all the performance freaks say,then this should be no big deal. Just remeber I leave the neighbor hood with a light throttle . No over fueling or romping.
 

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The Duramax idles with about 220°f exhaust temp on average. This will vary with engine coolant temp etc.





By activating an exhaust brake ("heat riser" function) with reduced back psi setting, I have the ability to increase (adjustable) the EGT by placing a load on the engine much like selecting D on the transmission.
 

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Dustin said:
The manual states to unplug the coolant heater before starting the engine. Since it is a maxium operating temperature, it does no good to leave it plugged in. I can't imagine it being good on the charging system either.

The charging system has nothing to do with the block heater unless you are using the truck to power your house/shop.
 

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One of the best things you can do for the engine is put on an oil pan heater. I doubt the engine will warm up much faster but it will certainly be easier on the engine than starting it with the oil cold. The heater and silicone to put it on the oil pan will run you less than $20.00. The folks who make the blue cold weather extention cords also make a very short 4 into 1 adapter. You can plug in the block heater, pan heater and two battery heaters with the same extension cord as long as the cord and timer are rated for the current draw.
 

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I guess when you live in Alaska, you need all the tricks. I'm surprised that a Webasto or Espar isn't standard equipment in those parts.....
 

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I run my pan heater as much/more than my block heater. A block heater will do little or nothing for the oil in the sump which needs to allow parts to move, and flow to the vital parts of the engine. The faster the oil warms up, the less oil bypasses through the full flow filter also...
 

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Kennedy--Very good point! Do you have an opinion on oil additives such as LUCAS heavy duty oil stabilizer? I've used LUCAS in my class 8 diesels for years because IMHO it keeps oil from draining off vital parts while the engine is shut down. I hesitate to use oil additives in my MAX because it doesn't see the hard pull/use that road trucks do. Plus I change the oil in my MAX on a more frequent basis due to the smaller oil pan copacity(10 qts. vs. 44 qts.) and now that I'm semi-retired from road driving my DMAX doesn't sit for long periods of time.
-----Phil
 

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Oldman said:
Dustin said:
The manual states to unplug the coolant heater before starting the engine. Since it is a maxium operating temperature, it does no good to leave it plugged in. I can't imagine it being good on the charging system either.

The charging system has nothing to do with the block heater unless you are using the truck to power your house/shop.

Dustin, I need to apologize for this smart-a**ed comment. You asjed a straight forward question and, after a few drinks, I came back with a BS answer. Really sorry for that. There's no room on a forum like this for that type of behavior.


So, no, leaving it plugged in will not harm teh charging system at all. The block heater runs off of house current and is not connected to the charging system in anyway.


Once again, sorry for the BS at your expense!
 

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I have left my heater plugged in for 3 days at one time. No problems. The only thing I have ever noticed is when it is warm out side, let's say 45 and up. With he heater plugged in the truck starts a little funny? It idles a little sparadic for 10 to 15 seconds then smooths right out. I have also started the truck with the heater plugged in. It does not cause any problems however I would never reccomend this to any one. Why? It is easier to drive away with the heater plugged in.
Unplug it before you start it. It is just an easier system.
 

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True with all vehicles:


If you turn on as much electrical stuff as possible, it will warm up slightly faster. The alternator will put a slight load on the engine. High beams, flashers, (stereo if you want the neighbors to shoot you), etc.


Not much, but every little bit helps.
 

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RedWSO said:
Has anyone heard about some power saver cord with the engine block heater?
Yes, Before my D/A I had one on a 1989 Ford 7.3 diesel that had come down from Whitehorse, Yukon. I took a trip across Canada last fall and everywhere I stopped I would see if I could find one. Nobody had a clue. When I got back to Whitehorse I found a parts store that had a listing for them. They told me that 6 or 7 years ago the electric utility was just about giving them away as a power conservation measure so there wasn't much sales potential. He did say they could order and it was about $30 Canadian. When I traded my old truck I totally forgot to take it with me, kind of dumb on my part.

The power save cord is a extension cord that has a thermostat built into it and it straps to one of the heater hoses. From what I was told at 20F it lets the power flow to the block heater and about 40F it shuts off.

For those of us on call out duty it worked great to plug in during cold weather and not use as much juice.

I have forgotten the company that makes it but any good parts store should be able to find it by the power saver name.
 

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CRUSHER said:
Kennedy--Very good point! Do you have an opinion on oil additives such as LUCAS heavy duty oil stabilizer? I've used LUCAS in my class 8 diesels for years because IMHO it keeps oil from draining off vital parts while the engine is shut down. I hesitate to use oil additives in my MAX because it doesn't see the hard pull/use that road trucks do. Plus I change the oil in my MAX on a more frequent basis due to the smaller oil pan copacity(10 qts. vs. 44 qts.) and now that I'm semi-retired from road driving my DMAX doesn't sit for long periods of time.
-----Phil




I used to try every additve/treatment I could find for my oil, but I've kinda followed George's advice in that the premier oil mfr's do a plenty good job of keeping sufficient additive in their oils.


I run Mobil Delvac 1 and no additive. I run additional bypass filtration, and run near GM recommendations (7k) for service intervals. I could go longer, but feel better about servicing/sampling/inspecting at regular intervals...





Fuel is a differebnt story though
 

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I have always been under the assumption that you are not to leave a block heater plugged in with the engine running. Vibration on a hot/plugged in heating element shortens the life of the block heater. True or not I do not know.
 

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The inline thermostats for extension cords can be found at Home Depot. They are little white blocks that are used with heat tape for water lines and the heaters for house gutters and downspouts.

John
 

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Indigo-


I have one of those "blocks" that will close the contacts when it goes below 40.


Only problem I see is that you'd have to tape it or otherwise attach it to a heater hose with some insulation IF you wanted it to respond to the coolant temp only. If you just leave the block dangling, and there's any wind at all which cools the case, then it's going to be on all the time anyway.


A relay and thin thermocouple lead right up against the hose (or inserted in the cooling system somewhere) would really be the ticket....
 
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