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The engine oil cooler on my truck was an air to oil cooler that sat in front of the radiator. My lines leak, however I have a good set of lines that run to a watter to oil cooler on the older model 6.2s. My radiator has the threaded holes in the radiator where the watter to oil cooler would be but I cannot tell if they are just plugs or if a watter to oil cooler is in there and if I remove the plugs I can run the older style hoses. The plugs are deep in the threads and I cannot tell if I turn them I might break the cap and wind up having to buy a new radiator.

Does anyone know if there is a watter to oil cooler in the newer style radiators that is just plugged?

I am still not convinced that the oil cooler is absolutely necessary when the truck is not used for towing on a regular basis. With the driving I do I found my engine oil temp to be about 210* measured through the dipstick hole with a type T thermocouple temp probe measures just after engine shutdown. However If I can fix it using parts I already have and not spend any money then it only makes sense. As of now I have the holes on the block plugged.

I can see where there is a need for a oil cooler when the truck is being used as to tow on a regular basis. The harder and engine is worked the hotter everything gets in the engine. However, I have done allot of work on irrigation engines that do not have oil coolers and I do not buy the "they are built heavier" stuff. Oil is oil and metal is metal. If oil is heated to the point that it looses viscosity it does not matter how heavy the machine is built.

I cannot find any hard data on the internet as to what temperature engine oil looses viscosity. Do any of you have any data?
 

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Pull the lines, cut the crimps loose, replace the hose with new engine oil-service hose from yer local parts emporium using stainless steel heater-hose clamps, back on with the repaired lines, and yer good to go.

Those ports in the radiator are usually painted-over plastic cap-plugs - test that with your knife - the sharp tip will not penetrate brass or steel
 

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91chevy6.2;1579971; said:
I am still not convinced that the oil cooler is absolutely necessary when the truck is not used for towing on a regular basis.

I can see where there is a need for a oil cooler when the truck is being used as to tow on a regular basis. The harder and engine is worked the hotter everything gets in the engine. However, I have done allot of work on irrigation engines that do not have oil coolers and I do not buy the "they are built heavier" stuff. Oil is oil and metal is metal. If oil is heated to the point that it looses viscosity it does not matter how heavy the machine is built.

I cannot find any hard data on the internet as to what temperature engine oil looses viscosity. Do any of you have any data?
I think you're overlooking a few things. Most HD diesels do not recommend using multi-viscosity engine oil except at certain temps. And, even many light-duty diesels - e.g. the 6.2 - recommend using straight 30W only - at air temps over 60 degrees F. or - 30W for any temp for continuous driving.
But, I suspect most people DO use a mutli-viscosity oil all the time - e.g. 15W40. I suspect part of the reason for the 6.2 oil cooler is to maintain hot-engine low-speed oil pressure that probably can drop very low with certain muti-viscosity oils. My Detroit Diesel 2-stroke-cycle engines drop dangerously low in OP at hot-idle if I use 15W-40 instead of straight 30W.
I suppose though - if someone used some common sense and care - you could do without the 6.2 oil-cooler just fine. But why not retain the safeguard?

You mentioned that "oil is oil" and no, it's not. And , some heavy-duty diesels can sustain low oil-pressure and survive on splash-oil lubrication, whereas many other engine MUST have sufficieint pressure lube all the time. All depends on the design.

All engine oils have a flash-point where they are ruined and lose lube quality - that is directly related to temperature. And evey oil is different - you must look at the specs. for the oil in question. Funny thing is - the old diesel standard - Shell Rotella - has a relatively low flash point at 410 degrees F.

Flash point is the temperature at which an oil gives off vapors that can be ignited with a flame held over the oil. The lower the flash point the greater tendency for the oil to suffer vaporization loss at high temperatures and to burn off on hot cylinder walls and pistons. The flash point can be an indicator of the quality of the base stock used. The higher the flash point the better. 400 F is the minimum to prevent possible high consumption. Flash point is in degrees F. In the following, it is the second number from the left.

Brand VI Flash Pour %ash %zinc

20W-50
AMSOIL 136 482 -38 <.5 ---
Castrol GTX 122 440 -15 .85 .12
Exxon High Performance 119 419 -13 .70 .11
Havoline Formula 3 125 465 -30 1.0 ---
Kendall GT-1 129 390 -25 1.0 .16
Pennzoil GT Perf. 120 460 -10 .9 ---
Quaker State Dlx. 155 430 -25 .9 ---
Red Line 150 503 -49 --- ---
Shell Truck Guard 130 450 -15 1.0 .15
Spectro Golden 4 174 440 -35 --- .15
Spectro Golden M.G. 174 440 -35 --- .13
Unocal 121 432 -11 .74 .12
Valvoline All Climate 125 430 -10 1.0 .11
Valvoline Turbo 140 440 -10 .99 .13
Valvoline Race 140 425 -10 1.2 .20
Valvoline Synthetic 146 465 -40 <1.5 .12
20W-40
Castrol Multi-Grade 110 440 -15 .85 .12
Quaker State 121 415 -15 .9 ---
15W-50
Chevron 204 415 -18 .96 .11
Mobil 1 170 470 -55 --- ---
Mystic JT8 144 420 -20 1.7 .15
Red Line 152 503 -49 --- ---
5W-50
Castrol Syntec 180 437 -45 1.2 .10 .095 % Phosphor
Quaker State Synquest 173 457 -76 --- ---
Pennzoil Performax 176 --- -69 --- ---
5W-40
Havoline 170 450 -40 1.4 ---
15W-40
AMSOIL 135 460 -38 <.5 ---
Castrol 134 415 -15 1.3 .14
Chevron Delo 400 136 421 -27 1.0 ---
Exxon XD3 --- 417 -11 .9 .14
Exxon XD3 Extra 135 399 -11 .95 .13
Kendall GT-1 135 410 -25 1.0 .16
Mystic JT8 142 440 -20 1.7 .15
Red Line 149 495 -40 --- ---
Shell Rotella w/XLA 146 410 -25 1.0 .13
Valvoline All Fleet 140 --- -10 1.0 .15
Valvoline Turbo 140 420 -10 .99 .13
10W-30
AMSOIL 142 480 -70 <.5 ---
Castrol GTX 140 415 -33 .85 .12
Chevron Supreme 150 401 -26 .96 .11
Exxon Superflo Hi Perf 135 392 -22 .70 .11
Exxon Superflo Supreme 133 400 -31 .85 .13
Havoline Formula 3 139 430 -30 1.0 ---
Kendall GT-1 139 390 -25 1.0 .16
Mobil 1 160 450 -65 --- ---
Pennzoil PLZ Turbo 140 410 -27 1.0 ---
Quaker State 156 410 -30 .9 ---
Red Line 139 475 -40 --- ---
Shell Fire and Ice 155 410 -35 .9 .12
Shell Super 2000 155 410 -35 1.0 .13
Shell Truck Guard 155 405 -35 1.0 .15
Spectro Golden M.G. 175 405 -40 --- ---
Unocal Super 153 428 -33 .92 .12
Valvoline All Climate 130 410 -26 1.0 .11
Valvoline Turbo 135 410 -26 .99 .13
Valvoline Race 130 410 -26 1.2 .20
Valvoline Synthetic 140 450 -40 <1.5 .12
5W-30
AMSOIL 168 480 -76 <.5 ---
Castrol GTX 156 400 -35 .80 .12
Chevron Supreme 202? 354 -46 .96 .11
Chevron Supreme Synt. 165 446 -72 1.1 .12
Exxon Superflow HP 148 392 -22 .70 .11
Havoline Formula 3 158 420 -40 1.0 ---
Mobil 1 165 445 -65 --- ---
Mystic JT8 161 390 -25 .95 .1
Quaker State 165 405 -35 .9 ---
Red Line 151 455 -49 --- ---
Shell Fire and Ice 167 405 -35 .9 .12
Unocal 151 414 -33 .81 .12
Valvoline All Climate 135 405 -40 1.0 .11
Valvoline Turbo 158 405 -40 .99 .13
Valvoline Synthetic 160 435 -40 <1.5 .12
 

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Discussion Starter #4
gmctd;1580160; said:
Pull the lines, cut the crimps loose, replace the hose with new engine oil-service hose from yer local parts emporium using stainless steel heater-hose clamps, back on with the repaired lines, and yer good to go.

Those ports in the radiator are usually painted-over plastic cap-plugs - test that with your knife - the sharp tip will not penetrate brass or steel
When you say cut the crimps do you mean cut the outsice crimp so the hose barbs are still there. Also will this hose and the SS clams hold up to the pressure of the oil?

What will it tell me if the caps are plastic. I need to know if there is a cooler in there.

Jdemaris,

I see you have a 91 4x4 6.2 in your signature.

Does it have the air to oil cooler.

If yes do your hoses connect dirrectly to the block or does one connect to the block and the other to the filter adapter? When I bought my truck it had the lines disconnected and I do not know for sure where they should be reconnected. There is a plug in my filter adapter and it was tightened to tight and cracked the adapter housing. I had a metal shop weld the hole shut. If I need that hole I will need to locate a filter adapter.

Also does you radiator have a space in it where a watter to oil cooler could go.

I would like to fix my oil cooler. What you said makes since, however, funds are extremely tight esp when you consider that I have already had to replace the IP, injectors, engine and transmission on this truck. I know that I should because it will protect what I have invested in it but it is hard to spend any more money on this truck.
 

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SS hose clamps are good for air conditioning and hydraulic pressures - your 60psi engine oil pressure is way below those, but you need to use oil-service hose.

Split the crimp-shells with a hacksaw and pop them off, pull the heat\oil-hardened hose off the barbs, on goes the new, tighten the clamps, reinstall.

Use the point of your knife to test the plastic plugs in the heat-exchanger fittings.
 
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