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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
During the winter months down here in the Outter Banks, North Carolina, a lot of people take their trucks on the beach but I have yet to do so. I've been a little hesitant as to what damages the sand/salt air might cause. Would I be ok just to go back and forth down the beach as long as I sprayed off the under carriage?
 

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of course sand and salt arent the best things in the world to get on and in our trucks. but i have not seen anything yet and ive been driving on the sand for...... 17 years with several trucks. this one for 3 years. no problems . yet......well my uncle had some steel wheels on his bronco and we went down for a week few years back. he had to replace them.
 

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If you are going in the water, you'll also want to change your fluids (differential, etc.).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am by no means going in the water just along the edge enough to where sand isn't too soft. Never taken my truck in sand period. Does it sink as fast as you might anticipate? Imagine having to pull a duramax out....eh
 

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I have been on sand many times with mine and it really matters what tires you have. A good mud tire will sink in really fast and want to dig in. Having a all season will make it want to hop and a A/T is possibly you best bet besides having a real sand tire. Also from past experiences a wide high side wall tire is the very best. Narrow low profile is NO GOOD. And yes salt will eat the crap out of your truck. But I would not know what it's like on a salt/sand beachas we don't have any of those inour parts. But when we put salt on our highways to melt snow in the winter, it will ruin a truck if you don't undercoat it and tke care of it.

Here is a clip of a truck in sand. It also has some cool stacks which also makes it cooler!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bi13hx6gMTM
 

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air your tires down to roughly 24psi.... you may find you need less but 24 is usually ok. then put it in 4x4 and have fun. do NOT use your brakes to stop in sand..... after youre done, hit a car wash or wash it yourself and if you can, use a sprinkler and set it where you can drive over it. drive over it slowly and it will wash the undercarriage pretty good.

down there you can do almost anything in 2wd if you dont stop. always safer in 4x4 all the time though because spinning may make you stuck when you otherwise wouldnt have been
 

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ive been out on Assateague island many times with my truck the sand is very live here. i have 35's with 20's and i air down to 25psi and start out in 2nd gear. that way i wont spin the tires with all the torque our trucks make, especially if you have a tune on your truck. i wash my truck off very well when i get done and powerwash the under carriage once a month in the summer when im on the beach every weekend.
 

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I drive on the beach a lot with stock size tires on the crew cab. I bought valves that screw on to the valve stem and have them adjusted to let the air down to 18 psi. They are worth the money as you can do all 4 tires at once and have the exact pressure in them. Stay away from the salt water and I rinse my truck off every time I come off the beach with out fail. Where I go on the beach a pass is needed and I see pass numbers as high as 6000. The majority of trucks are stock 4X4 but a good number have the larger tires that don't need so much air let out of them. Go for it.
 

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Go for it. I ran mine on the outer banks beaches this spring. The only issue I saw was trans tempature. 200-225 degrees until I lowered the air pressure and ran in Tow/Haul mode. Keep up your speed, especially when entering or leaving the beach, the sand is very soft and you have the incline of the dunes. Carry a strap in case you need help or need to help someone else. Have Fun!
 

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I've been out over sand at Cape Cod (National Seashore - Race Point) for many years, great fun. They require permits and require a training video for newbies. In addition to the other tips on airing down, it is always a good idea to bring boards to support jacks, good spare ( check it ), a good jack (if not a high lift off road version) and a tow strap or two in case you need help. And don't forget a shovel.

Take your time in the soft stuff, don't spin, you'll bury yourself.

Stay higher on the beach and try not to cross below the high tide line unless you have to. If you bury your rig below that point and don't get out before the tide comes in, your rig is toast. Rusty wheels will be the least of your worries.

I took my half ton extended cab with 265s on but aired down to 12 with no prob. I can't speak to 10 ply E's but others here have.

Sand conditions differ beach to beach, this is just my experience. Your mileage may vary.

Have fun. My family loved it, like having a private beach, no crowds. Very cool.
 

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we do it at pismo beach all the time. as long as you wash it down real good you should be o.k.
 

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Just rinse the undercarriage well afterwards
 

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I would imagine that the roads we have to drive on in the winter months, daily, are way, way worse than any beach you could put your truck through.
 

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The state park beach that I drive on has a mandatory list of things you must have with you to drive on the beach: 1/4 tank fuel, tow strap, shovel, 12"X12" board for jack, fire extinguisher and first aid kit.
 

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X2

I would imagine that the roads we have to drive on in the winter months, daily, are way, way worse than any beach you could put your truck through.
 

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You guys got it goos. I wish that all we had was salty sand on the beaches with some palm trees... man life is tough on the coast!
 

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I had mine out on Carolina Beach this summer (285 BFGAT's) I didn't air them down and eventually bogged down in the soft stuff.

Air them down... It makes all the difference. Also like timzr02 said - watch yours trans, it will creep up there fast. Through probably not as bad now thats its cooler out.

Have fun, wish I was back there.
 

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I run 285/75R16 ran the air stock had issues. Lowered them down with the advise from the forum to 25psi, and go everywhere at the outer banks except ramp 39 don't go there SOFT! I always spray bomb the bare spots on the frame and the inside of the bumper and fender wells with black or clear paint, the cheap stuff will last long enough, and put a coat of wax on the entire truck mainly around the bottom all the way around. People ask how I keep my truck looking so clean after being out in the sand about every month. Clean BEFORE and hose it off after and redetail. Sounds anal but I like a clean truck and not scared to use it. Min. equipment for a DMAX, air tank, a jack, piece of wood, strap,commonsense. Have fun.
 

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I drive on the beach at least once a month. I also pull a lot of trucks out who dont know how to air down there tires. If you have any chrome or items you want to keep a little more safe then just spray them down with wd-40 before getting on the beach. It makes it easier to wash things off and protects the chrome. Check my garage for lots of beach pics.
 

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I go to Pismo about once a year, although not with my LMM yet. I drop the air down to ~20psi on both my truck and trailer, it is important to air down the trailer too. And I don't drive in the water or really wet sand.

As a side note, make sure you keep your windows up or you will be cleaning sand out of your truck for months.
 
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