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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have searched the forums and havent found an answer here or in the maintainence section so here goes. How will GMC/Chevy go about cleaning these buggers????????? I know about the regen modes and mainly it being self sufficient, but from waht I read they will require periodical off the truck cleaning. Caterpillar from what I read will have an exchange program until they get machines in dealerships (ie read machines 10000+). I do know federal epa says that the filter must not require off the truck maintenance for at least 100,000 miles or more (in light duty applications. HOwever, w/some hot shot guys or guys hauling rv's who run 100000 miles a year a dpf cleaning isnt so far off. OR I imagine somone runs off road fuel (higher sulfer quicker clogging), or ash 2 stroke oil etc would maybe require a quicker cleaning that jsut plain regens cant handle by itself. My question to the cat dealer was these this cost so darn much waht IF I lived in flordia and I got one exchanged and I got an exchanged one from say MINN or new york etc and it rusted away. The dealers response was UH, well, they are expensive due to precious metals used to make them, and they should be inspected for rust etc before they are sent out to dealerships. I called 2 local dealerships for giggles this afternoon and said ok already to place an order for a new truck , but first how are you gonna clean my dpf when I need maintenance. Both dealerships were what do who , waht, clean your what???? After explaining it to them (both dealers seemed less then knowledgable) that these new trucks have soot traps and will potentially require some maintenace, how will they handle it (have machines, stock exchanges etc etc) they transfered me into the maintenace dept who were again less then helpful. Like i said the caterpillar off vehicle cleaning machine was reported to cost around 10,000 dollars, I cant imagine every chevy dealer having one. Any ideas?
 

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I will try to help answer some your questions, but first I’m going say I’m happy you’re considering a 07 LMM. The next thing the periodic maintenance you’re mentioning is for cleaning the ash out of the DPF. You are correct in the cost of the cleaning machine, it’s cost is somewhere around 10K. Now, like you stated the ash-cleaning interval should be around 120K, under the conditions that your engine does not burn excessive oil and the correct CJ-4 oil is used.

The regens you mention only clean the soot or unburned HC, they do not take care of the ash. The ash comes from oil that is a natural by produce of diesel combustion.

Now, running the off road fuel (higher sulfur content fuel) will damage the DOC and DPF, it will cause the precious metals to degrade, thus their efficiency will degrade and they will need replacement not cleaning.

The reason the dealers don’t know about the maintenance is because it’s still under the final stages of development. We hope that the dealers will have a cleaning procedure to remove the ash as soon as possible. What is likely to happen is the high volume dealers will get a cleaning machine and the smaller dealers will have to send the filter to the higher volume dealers for cleaning, both the soot and ash have to be collected and safely disposed of since they are both hazardous materials.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Dmaxpower2;1554575; said:
I will try to help answer some your questions, but first I’m going say I’m happy you’re considering a 07 LMM. The next thing the periodic maintenance you’re mentioning is for cleaning the ash out of the DPF. You are correct in the cost of the cleaning machine, it’s cost is somewhere around 10K. Now, like you stated the ash-cleaning interval should be around 120K, under the conditions that your engine does not burn excessive oil and the correct CJ-4 oil is used.

The regens you mention only clean the soot or unburned HC, they do not take care of the ash. The ash comes from oil that is a natural by produce of diesel combustion.

Now, running the off road fuel (higher sulfur content fuel) will damage the DOC and DPF, it will cause the precious metals to degrade, thus their efficiency will degrade and they will need replacement not cleaning.

The reason the dealers don’t know about the maintenance is because it’s still under the final stages of development. We hope that the dealers will have a cleaning procedure to remove the ash as soon as possible. What is likely to happen is the high volume dealers will get a cleaning machine and the smaller dealers will have to send the filter to the higher volume dealers for cleaning, both the soot and ash have to be collected and safely disposed of since they are both hazardous materials.
I know, this is basically my ?, will they be sent off to be cleaned (ie losing my truck for few days), or will htey have "clean" ones in stock and its just an exchange deal. Or will gm supply all of the dealers w/a machine :p: (yes I know that will never ever happen. LIke i said I know cat on the medium and heavy duty trucks are doing the exchange, cat dealers should have a "good clean one" in stock take yours off put the new one on and down the road. I don tknow what will happen if you get a "good" one that rusts out 3 months after you put it on, I would hope cat covers it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
PS I doubt I will order a new turck I just said I was ready to to see waht they would say. I wont order a new one till at least 08 or 09 before the new 2010 emmission junk comes out and they get the bugs 100% worked out of these. I know they been running them in test mules and overseas but still want to see all the kinks worked out. I still have not gotton 100% conformation that no way no how the darn thing wont light up when im in a hay field etc. I have been told the dpf is double insulated and the skin of it wont be "much" hotter then a current muffler gets but I sure dont want regen mode in the field. I know its SUPPOSED to only happen when traveling above 30mph but I want to make darn sure.
 

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this is all the info I could find in service info. Exhaust Particulate Filter Cleaning (DPF Service Regeneration)
Diagnostic Instructions
• Perform the Diagnostic System Check - Vehicle prior to using this diagnostic procedure.

• Review Strategy Based Diagnosis for an overview of the diagnostic approach.

• Diagnostic Procedure Instructions provide an overview of each diagnostic category.

Caution: Tailpipe outlet exhaust temperature will be greater than 300°C (572°F) during service regeneration. To help prevent personal injury or property damage from fire or burns, perform the following:

Do not connect any shop exhaust removal hoses to the vehicle's tailpipe.
Park the vehicle outdoors and keep people, other vehicles, and combustible material away during service regeneration.
Do not leave the vehicle unattended.

Caution: To avoid extremely elevated exhaust temperatures, inspect and remove any debris or mud build up at the exhaust cooler located at the tailpipe.

Notice: Due to the elevated engine temperatures created while performing this procedure it is imperative to keep the front of vehicle in an open environment, away from any walls or buildings, this will ensure proper airflow across the radiator.

Conditions for Running
The following conditions must be met in order to enable DPF Service Regeneration:


Important: Do not refuel the vehicle during DPF Service Regeneration.


• There are no active DTCs displayed.

• The battery voltage is greater than 10 volts.

• The engine speed is between 600-1,250 RPM.

• The exhaust gas temperature (EGT) sensors 1 and 2 are less than 400°C (752°F).

• The engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor 1 is between 70-115°C (158-239°F).

• The brake pedal and accelerator pedal are in the released position.

• The transmission is in park or neutral.

Test Procedure
Review the DTC information with a scan tool. Repair any codes before proceeding with DPF Service Regeneration.
Check the following fluid levels before and after this procedure:
• Engine oil

• Engine coolant

• Power steering

• Transmission

• Fuel level should be over 15 percent to ensure a successful regeneration.

Park the vehicle outside the facility and away from any obstacles.
Place the transmission in Park and apply the parking brake.
Raise the hood.
Select DPF Service Regeneration in the Output Controls menu and follow the instruction on the scan tool.
Command the DPF Service Regeneration with the scan tool.
The DPF Service Regeneration will take approximately 35 minutes consisting of the following:
8.1. 8 minutes for the exhaust system to warm up, with the engine speed slowly increasing to 1,600 RPM, then 2,200 RPM and finally 2,500 RPM

8.2. 20 minutes for the DPF to regenerate at 2,500 RPM

8.3. 3 minutes for the exhaust system to cool down with the engine speed will slowly returning to 1,400 RPM

8.4. 3 minutes at 800 RPM, then idle speed of 680 RPM

The DPF Service Regeneration can be terminated by performing any of the following actions:
• Applying the brake pedal

• Applying the accelerator pedal

• Selecting Drive or Reverse

• Commanding DPF Service Regeneration OFF using the scan tool or disconnecting the scan tool from the vehicle

• The DPF Service Regeneration will be automatically terminated if certain DTCs are set or if the DPF or ECT temperatures exceed a calibrated threshold.

After the service regeneration completes, allow the vehicle to idle for an additional 2 minutes while monitoring the scan tool DTC information. There should be no additional DTCs setting.
⇒ If service regeneration aborts, correct the condition for running service regeneration and then reset.

⇒ If service regeneration fails, repair the vehicle for the condition indicated by the failure message on the scan tool. Refer to the Service Regeneration Fault Table.

Caution: Refer to Road Test Caution in Cautions and Notices.

Important: DTC P2002 can set if the vehicle is not operated under the following conditions:

Operate the vehicle within the following conditions:
• The vehicle speed is greater than 40 km/h (25 mph).

• The engine load is greater that 25 percent.

• Engine Run Time Since Last DPF Regeneration is less than 10 minutes.

• Distance Since Last DPF Regeneration is less than 30 km (18.6 miles).

• The Soot Mass is less than 40 grams.

• DTC P2002 runs one time after the above conditions are met.

• Verify that P2002 has run and passed.

Verify that the scan tool DPF Soot Mass parameter is less than 10 grams.
Service Regeneration Unsuccessful
• Observe the scan tool for DTCs. If any DTCs are displayed, refer to Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) List - Vehicle .

• DPF Regen Inhibit Reason parameter, will display a reason for not enabling DPF Service Regeneration. Refer to the parameters that are displayed.

• DPF Regeneration Status parameter will display Active or Not Required depending on the current commanded state of regeneration.

• DPF Soot Mass parameter, will display greater than 10 grams, indicating excessive particulate matter is still present in the filter, another Service Regeneration may be necessary.

Service Regeneration Status Fault Table DPF Regeneration Parameters
Successful Regeneration
Unsuccessful Regeneration

DPF Regeneration Status
Not Required
Active or Required

DPF Regeneration Reason
None
Fuel Used

Engine Run Time

Distance Traveled

DPF Pressure

Soot Mass

Calculated Soot

DPF Regeneration Inhibit Reason
None
Varies

DPF Soot Mass
Less than 10 grams
Greater than 10 grams



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seems to me its all done onboard with scan tool but I could be wrong. this is out of owners manual.Diesel Particulate Filter
Your vehicle has a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) as part of the exhaust system to reduce vehicle emissions. The DPF requires a unique exhaust tailpipe with an exhaust cooler. The exhaust cooler mixes air with the exhaust at the tailpipe. This lowers the exhaust temperature before it leaves the tailpipe.

The DPF, the tailpipe, or other exhaust system components must not be altered. The area where the exhaust cooler connects to the tailpipe should be inspected, especially the area where the fresh air enters the cooler. Make sure the openings are not restricted or plugged with mud or dirt which could inhibit exhaust gas cooling. See "Exhaust System Inspection" under At Least Once a Year .

The DPF will regenerate (self-clean) itself as part of normal operation. The Engine Control Module (ECM) controls this function based on several factors including the amount of fuel consumed, hours of engine operation and miles driven. On average, the DPF will clean itself about once per tank of fuel.

Notice: Use of diesel fuel other than Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (15 ppm sulfur maximum) or engine oil other than low ash CJ-4 oil will cause permanent damage to the DPF and related components. This damage would not be covered by your warranty.

Your DPF equipped vehicle has specific fuel and engine oil requirements. See What Fuel to Use and Engine Oil to make sure you use the required fuel and engine oil.

Caution: During DPF regeneration, the exhaust system and exhaust gases are very hot. Things that burn could touch hot exhaust parts under your vehicle and ignite. You or others could be burned. Do not park near or over papers, leaves, dry grass, or other things that can burn.

If you have a pickup model and the CLEAN EXHAUST FILTER SEE OWNERS MANUAL NOW message appears in the Driver Information Center (DIC), the DPF needs to be cleaned. If you have a van model and the engine exhaust gas filter warning light, CLN EXH FILTER, comes on, the DPF needs to be cleaned. See DIC Warnings and Messages for pickup models, or Engine Exhaust Gas Filter Warning Light for van models.

To clean the filter, drive the vehicle above 30 mph (50 km/h) until the warning light/message goes off. This will take about 20 minutes.

Notice: Extended idle should be avoided because the DPF system is not capable of regenerating at idle. During extended idle, be sure to watch for the DPF warning light/message which could come on to indicate that the DPF is becoming full and needs regeneration. If the light/message comes on, stop the idling and drive the vehicle as described previously to clean the filter. Continued idling with the warning light/message on could cause irreversible damage to the DPF requiring repair and possible replacement that might not be covered by your warranty.

Extended idling in PARK (P) can cause exhaust parts and gases to become very hot. Keep the exhaust area clear of material that could ignite or burn. See Parking Over Things That Burn for more information.

The DPF warning light/message comes on when the DPF is dirty and needs regenerating. You will also notice a change in the exhaust sound and engine idle speed. This is normal.

If you continue to drive with the DPF warning light/message on and the exhaust filter is not cleaned as required, the check engine and reduced engine power warning lights will come on and dealer/retailer service is necessary. See Malfunction Indicator Lamp and Reduced Engine Power Light for more information.

For vehicles with Power Take-Off (PTO), monitor the instrument panel cluster for lights related to the DPF.

All engines consume some amount of engine oil. This is normal. The by-product of combustion of engine oil is ash. The ash will become trapped in the DPF over the life of the vehicle. Eventually, the buildup of ash will restrict the exhaust gases and the DPF will need to be cleaned or replaced.

See Accessories and Modifications for important information.
 

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See Parking Over Things That Burn for more information
LOL

This crap is supposed to be better for the environment yet we better not park over things that burn. I can see the headline now "Diesel pickup sparks forest fire". The irony of all this just cracks me up.
 

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mikek996;1554819; said:
this is all the info I could find in service info. Exhaust Particulate Filter Cleaning (DPF Service Regeneration)
Diagnostic Instructions
• Perform the Diagnostic System Check - Vehicle prior to using this diagnostic procedure.

• Review Strategy Based Diagnosis for an overview of the diagnostic approach.

• Diagnostic Procedure Instructions provide an overview of each diagnostic category.

Caution: Tailpipe outlet exhaust temperature will be greater than 300°C (572°F) during service regeneration. To help prevent personal injury or property damage from fire or burns, perform the following:

Do not connect any shop exhaust removal hoses to the vehicle's tailpipe.
Park the vehicle outdoors and keep people, other vehicles, and combustible material away during service regeneration.
Do not leave the vehicle unattended.

Caution: To avoid extremely elevated exhaust temperatures, inspect and remove any debris or mud build up at the exhaust cooler located at the tailpipe.

Notice: Due to the elevated engine temperatures created while performing this procedure it is imperative to keep the front of vehicle in an open environment, away from any walls or buildings, this will ensure proper airflow across the radiator.

Conditions for Running
The following conditions must be met in order to enable DPF Service Regeneration:


Important: Do not refuel the vehicle during DPF Service Regeneration.


• There are no active DTCs displayed.

• The battery voltage is greater than 10 volts.

• The engine speed is between 600-1,250 RPM.

• The exhaust gas temperature (EGT) sensors 1 and 2 are less than 400°C (752°F).

• The engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor 1 is between 70-115°C (158-239°F).

• The brake pedal and accelerator pedal are in the released position.

• The transmission is in park or neutral.

Test Procedure
Review the DTC information with a scan tool. Repair any codes before proceeding with DPF Service Regeneration.
Check the following fluid levels before and after this procedure:
• Engine oil

• Engine coolant

• Power steering

• Transmission

• Fuel level should be over 15 percent to ensure a successful regeneration.

Park the vehicle outside the facility and away from any obstacles.
Place the transmission in Park and apply the parking brake.
Raise the hood.
Select DPF Service Regeneration in the Output Controls menu and follow the instruction on the scan tool.
Command the DPF Service Regeneration with the scan tool.
The DPF Service Regeneration will take approximately 35 minutes consisting of the following:
8.1. 8 minutes for the exhaust system to warm up, with the engine speed slowly increasing to 1,600 RPM, then 2,200 RPM and finally 2,500 RPM

8.2. 20 minutes for the DPF to regenerate at 2,500 RPM

8.3. 3 minutes for the exhaust system to cool down with the engine speed will slowly returning to 1,400 RPM

8.4. 3 minutes at 800 RPM, then idle speed of 680 RPM

The DPF Service Regeneration can be terminated by performing any of the following actions:
• Applying the brake pedal

• Applying the accelerator pedal

• Selecting Drive or Reverse

• Commanding DPF Service Regeneration OFF using the scan tool or disconnecting the scan tool from the vehicle

• The DPF Service Regeneration will be automatically terminated if certain DTCs are set or if the DPF or ECT temperatures exceed a calibrated threshold.

After the service regeneration completes, allow the vehicle to idle for an additional 2 minutes while monitoring the scan tool DTC information. There should be no additional DTCs setting.
⇒ If service regeneration aborts, correct the condition for running service regeneration and then reset.

⇒ If service regeneration fails, repair the vehicle for the condition indicated by the failure message on the scan tool. Refer to the Service Regeneration Fault Table.

Caution: Refer to Road Test Caution in Cautions and Notices.

Important: DTC P2002 can set if the vehicle is not operated under the following conditions:

Operate the vehicle within the following conditions:
• The vehicle speed is greater than 40 km/h (25 mph).

• The engine load is greater that 25 percent.

• Engine Run Time Since Last DPF Regeneration is less than 10 minutes.

• Distance Since Last DPF Regeneration is less than 30 km (18.6 miles).

• The Soot Mass is less than 40 grams.

• DTC P2002 runs one time after the above conditions are met.

• Verify that P2002 has run and passed.

Verify that the scan tool DPF Soot Mass parameter is less than 10 grams.
Service Regeneration Unsuccessful
• Observe the scan tool for DTCs. If any DTCs are displayed, refer to Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) List - Vehicle .

• DPF Regen Inhibit Reason parameter, will display a reason for not enabling DPF Service Regeneration. Refer to the parameters that are displayed.

• DPF Regeneration Status parameter will display Active or Not Required depending on the current commanded state of regeneration.

• DPF Soot Mass parameter, will display greater than 10 grams, indicating excessive particulate matter is still present in the filter, another Service Regeneration may be necessary.

Service Regeneration Status Fault Table DPF Regeneration Parameters
Successful Regeneration
Unsuccessful Regeneration

DPF Regeneration Status
Not Required
Active or Required

DPF Regeneration Reason
None
Fuel Used

Engine Run Time

Distance Traveled

DPF Pressure

Soot Mass

Calculated Soot

DPF Regeneration Inhibit Reason
None
Varies

DPF Soot Mass
Less than 10 grams
Greater than 10 grams



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
This service procedure is for the removal of excessive soot only, not ash, regeneration will not remove the ash. This is another company's way of cleaning the ash. The DPF will be serviced regenerated first, and then removed from the vehicle, it will then be blown out with compressed air. What they forgot to mention was how the ash was going to be collected and disposed of safely.

I would not worry about rust through, the DPF is stainless steel and double walled.

As far the exchanging the DPF, I don't think that will happen because there would be no way of telling how many miles are on the exchanged unit. I am sure if your truck with 10k on it needs a DPF, it will get a new one.

Remember, the only reason the Diesels are getting the Exhaust Filter is because of CARB / EPA new emission regulations. :rules: The regulations are going to get even tighter in 2010MY.

I could'nt agree more with you guys, this is a :nutkick: ::
 

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I guess what i'm saying is there is no procedure for removing it to clean ash In GM's perfect world there would be no ash if the correct fuel and oil is used. the whole thing doent look servicable it will probly need replacement if it plugs with ash. but again its just speculation because they havent put any info out yet. and there is nothing about it in the service manual or maintenance schedule.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Dmaxpower2;1555223; said:
This service procedure is for the removal of excessive soot only, not ash, regeneration will not remove the ash. This is another company's way of cleaning the ash. The DPF will be serviced regenerated first, and then removed from the vehicle, it will then be blown out with compressed air. What they forgot to mention was how the ash was going to be collected and disposed of safely.

I would not worry about rust through, the DPF is stainless steel and double walled.

As far the exchanging the DPF, I don't think that will happen because there would be no way of telling how many miles are on the exchanged unit. I am sure if your truck with 10k on it needs a DPF, it will get a new one.

Remember, the only reason the Diesels are getting the Exhaust Filter is because of CARB / EPA new emission regulations. :rules: The regulations are going to get even tighter in 2010MY.

I could'nt agree more with you guys, this is a :nutkick: ::
To clean the filter, drive the vehicle above 30 mph (50 km/h) until the warning light/message goes off. This will take about 20 minutes.
What if you drive in new york? Seriously drive 30mph+???????/ All seriousness what do those guys do?? seems crazy youd have to drive on the freeway or to anther city to clean your dpf(we're supposed to be conserving fuel etc and now I have to take my truck out for a drive to clean her out? YOu say its not supposed to be covered w/mud???????? MY truck is almost always covered in mud, many construction trucks are ALWAYS covered in mud. YOur tell ing me all the pickups my company has will have to be washed even weekly??? NO IDLINg???? What about wrecker companies??????50% of thier time is idling usually. Drive across town stop, fill out the paper work load it, chain it down drive across town, unchhain it, give the apper work to dispatch get the coffee, bathroom call the wife and kids and go on antoher call across town. I agree w/the above post this isnt describing the procedure to collect the ash. This will be have to be done off the vehicle. I know it has partially to do w/air (though I dont think you can go outback stick your air nozzle in there and blow it out. (plus you have to collect the "hazardous material".) This stuff used to just go inot the atmosphere for the last 100 yeras and now all the sudden its hazardous material that will sit in some landfill for the next 1,000 years until it leaks into a water supply underground. ALL LANDFILLS EVENTUALLY LEAK. I can go down to the local landfill and dig down and read the newspaper from 40 years ago they are packed so tight, air cant get to it and decompose it. But back to the origional ? how are dealers gonna deal w/this ash???? I Know by epa federal regulations, the cleaning must not occur before 100,000 miles (typical intervals should be aroudn 120,000 miles. but some of these guys are putting 100.000 miles per year on so realistically its not too far off ahvgin to have one of them cleaned and seems dealers dont ahve a freaking clue. But more importantly some bozo somewhere in the world is gonna dump red fuel in it or put used engine oil in it or something and clogg the dpf w/in a month of woning his new truck and whats gm gonna do about cleaning it. I KNOW gm shouldnt cover the cost of cleaning or cleaingin it out if somone put the wrong fuel in their truck (i know those posts are coming) but the fact is its screwed up and how is gm gonna fix it or clean it regardless fo fault.
 

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thats why i think if they expect it to be 100k before it needs to be dome you may just need to buy a new one and the old one will go back for core. and thejdman said it for me if some idiot puts in off road fuel he deserves to pay the price of a new one, it is also illeagal. someday you may not even be able to buy off road diesel.
 

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mikek996;1555342; said:
I guess what i'm saying is there is no procedure for removing it to clean ash In GM's perfect world there would be no ash if the correct fuel and oil is used. the whole thing doent look servicable it will probly need replacement if it plugs with ash. but again its just speculation because they havent put any info out yet. and there is nothing about it in the service manual or maintenance schedule.
There will be a procedure for removing the ash, but,it's not available as of today. The DPF is serviceable, the special tools needed to clean the DPF are very expensive, the tool is large and the cost is around 10K. You don't have to worry about the ash for 120k miles. The ash build up will be minimal, the wrong fuel will not cause excessive ash, and even the wrong oil will not impact the amount of ash.

The engine burning too much oil is the main factor in ash accumulation.

How much oil does your Duramax burn?
 

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thejdman04;1555353; said:
What if you drive in new york? Seriously drive 30mph+???????/ All seriousness what do those guys do?? seems crazy youd have to drive on the freeway or to anther city to clean your dpf(we're supposed to be conserving fuel etc and now I have to take my truck out for a drive to clean her out?
Regeneration will happen at 30 MPH, even with the engine at an idle and in gear. The reason for a freeway trip would be somthing like this, if the vehicle is driven in very short trips and at very low speeds. Then a clean exhaust message will appear on the dash because a regen is needed. The most effective way to enable an automatic or an active regen is to drive the vehicle over 40 MPH for approx 20 minutes.

thejdman04;1555353; said:
YOu say its not supposed to be covered w/mud???????? MY truck is almost always covered in mud, many construction trucks are ALWAYS covered in mud.
The only part of the exhaust system that needs to stay clear is the openings at the exhaust cooler.The vents at the cooler must remain clear in order to reduce exhaust temps durning regens.

thejdman04;1555353; said:
YOur tell ing me all the pickups my company has will have to be washed even weekly??? NO IDLINg???? What about wrecker companies??????50% of thier time is idling usually. Drive across town stop, fill out the paper work load it, chain it down drive across town, unchhain it, give the apper work to dispatch get the coffee, bathroom call the wife and kids and go on antoher call across town. I agree w/the above post this isnt describing the procedure to collect the ash. This will be have to be done off the vehicle. I know it has partially to do w/air (though I dont think you can go outback stick your air nozzle in there and blow it out. (plus you have to collect the "hazardous material".) This stuff used to just go inot the atmosphere for the last 100 yeras and now all the sudden its hazardous material that will sit in some landfill for the next 1,000 years until it leaks into a water supply underground. ALL LANDFILLS EVENTUALLY LEAK. I can go down to the local landfill and dig down and read the newspaper from 40 years ago they are packed so tight, air cant get to it and decompose it. But back to the origional ? how are dealers gonna deal w/this ash???? I Know by epa federal regulations, the cleaning must not occur before 100,000 miles (typical intervals should be aroudn 120,000 miles. but some of these guys are putting 100.000 miles per year on so realistically its not too far off ahvgin to have one of them cleaned and seems dealers dont ahve a freaking clue. But more importantly some bozo somewhere in the world is gonna dump red fuel in it or put used engine oil in it or something and clogg the dpf w/in a month of woning his new truck and whats gm gonna do about cleaning it. I KNOW gm shouldnt cover the cost of cleaning or cleaingin it out if somone put the wrong fuel in their truck (i know those posts are coming) but the fact is its screwed up and how is gm gonna fix it or clean it regardless fo fault.
Good questions, and I see your concerns, but, it's not going to be that big a deal. The truck can get muddy, it can idle for many hours with no problems. The dealer are currently being trained on how to service the DPF.
 

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what kind of temps is the DPF going to see when it is <5 degrees like this morning and I was blowing smoke for 15 miles. I do not think the DPF is going to get hot enought up here in Mi in the winter, and I hope you new guys who go into regren up here can do it, with out going to limp
 

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jevanb;1555631; said:
what kind of temps is the DPF going to see when it is <5 degrees like this morning and I was blowing smoke for 15 miles. I do not think the DPF is going to get hot enought up here in Mi in the winter, and I hope you new guys who go into regren up here can do it, with out going to limp
When a regen is required, the DPF will get hot enough, regen has been tested at ambient temps as low as -40F. The regen happened and the DPF was effectively cleaned with no problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
jevanb;1555631; said:
what kind of temps is the DPF going to see when it is <5 degrees like this morning and I was blowing smoke for 15 miles. I do not think the DPF is going to get hot enought up here in Mi in the winter, and I hope you new guys who go into regren up here can do it, with out going to limp
It wont be a problem because it takes raw diesel and injects it into the dpf (low mpg(will do this aprox 1 time per tank). ITll cook that doesnt worry me. I know we got a few service trucks too at work pto runs air compressor and crane alot of times the truck pto engaged work on it run an impact for few seconds and may sit another 1/2 hour before "idling up" again. You want me to walk over and shut the truck off all the time???

The ash build up will be minimal, the wrong fuel will not cause excessive ash, and even the wrong oil will not impact the amount of ash.
I do feel your very very wrong w/taht statement. It may not clog them up immediatly but dont fool yourself and think you can burn higher sulfer fuel or put ci4 in it ive read many articles that say ci 4 or is higher a sh content that builds up your dpf. What about when these trucks get 20 yeras old?????? We got some old old old 1985 (22 years old) trucks that have been in accidents, (front end all smashed up), tie rods brakes etc etc that arent suitable for the road, the trucks either get drug or driven very slowly around the gravel pit and are our in pit service trucks. They never get near 30mph (pry fall apart if they did) , at this point trucks are junk?????? I mean I know the trucks are junk but serve that purpose. THe way these dpf's are tied into the computers I dont think its as easy as saying the truck doesnt get used on the road, sticktly a "site" vehcle take it off. AAAHHH waht happened to the good old days
 

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I did not say it was a good thing to use the wrong fuel, nor, do I recommending using it. What I met to say is that the wrong fuel will NOT cause ash build up, it will degrade the DOC and DPF and then they will have to be replaced.

I was not saying use the wrong oil, I am saying use API CJ-4 engine oil to help slow down the ash build up. But, if you happen to use the wrong oil once in while, no harm will be done. All of the development work on the DPF was done with API CI 4 engine oil with no excessive ash loading as a result. So, if the wrong is used consistently, then yes, the DPF will build up ash sooner. It may take 80-90K miles instead of 120K to see the affects of using the wrong oil.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
So any diesel techs out there work for gm they can go into work tomorrow and ask. Tell them you got a buddy who hauls 100,000 miles per year so will be needing a cleaing very soon after he buys it and want to know what hell have to do since his business depends on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
So any diesel techs out there work for gm they can go into work tomorrow and ask. Tell them you got a buddy who hauls 100,000 miles per year so will be needing a cleaing very soon after he buys it and want to know what hell have to do since his business depends on it.
 

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Dmaxpower2;1555514; said:
Regeneration will happen at 30 MPH, even with the engine at an idle and in gear.
Could you provide additional explanation here? How can the truck be going 30 MPH if the engine is at an idle?

This is a real issue for me. During the winter, the truck will see most of its use as a daily driver. This results in mostly commuting in stop and go traffic. As such, I will burn a tank of fuel each week, but will most likely not experience a period of remaining over 30 MPH for 20 minutes during that time. Does this mean that I will need to plan on going out for a 20-30 minute drive one night a week after rush hour traffic has dissipated the entire time I own this truck?
 
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