Diesel Place banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
398 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>How many of you guys have diesels and live where it gets real cold?</DIV>
<DIV>My truck doesn't get used everyday, sometimes only 1 or 2 days A week.</DIV>
<DIV>I let it warm up for 15 to 20 minutes before driving and was wondering if this is good or bad for the engine.</DIV>
<DIV>When I do drive it in the cold I usually go 20 to 30 miles, so it does gets warmed up good.</DIV>
<DIV>Anyone that could shed some light on this good or bad please chime in.</DIV>
<DIV>I don't use the block heater, cause I never know when I'm going to go somewhere.</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>Thanks</DIV>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
958 Posts
It's not good for the engine to sit that long unless you've got a high idle installed. I try to not let mine idle for more than a couple minutes after a cold-start, it will just sit there and run cold, it will never get to operating temperature no matter how long you let it sit there unless you get in and drive it.


A good rule of thumb is 30 seconds or so if idle, and drive it real gently until it's at operating temps. Definitely use your block heater if you can, you won't believe the difference when it's real cold out. I try to plug mine in a couple of hours before I'm leaving.


I do the saem as you with my d-max, sometimes only gets driven a couple days a week.. My 6.5 is driven daily on long highway trips, I started it at 4:30 this morning and it was -32 out, sure am glad I had it plugged in overnight!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,362 Posts
I have had three diesels and everytime it is going to be cold I plug it in and leave her pluged in. The electric bill probably reflects me doing so but when I want to jump in her and go I know she is warm...I still let her run a few minutes also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
398 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Camstyn said:
It's not good for the engine to sit that long unless you've got a high idle installed. I try to not let mine idle for more than a couple minutes after a cold-start, it will just sit there and run cold, it will never get to operating temperature no matter how long you let it sit there unless you get in and drive it.




OK, Another question, why is it hard on the engine to let it run?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
444 Posts
It's not too good to let your engine idle that long. It causes cylinder wash among other things. The best thing to if it really cold, is to let it idle for a minute, then start driving easy for a couple of miles. It will heat up much faster. A diesel loves being under load.


Unless you have a high idle, a diesel will not warm up idling. The 2003's came with a front cover. I use the just the top cover when it goes below 20 degrees. It works really good at allowing the engine and transmission to warm up quickly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
958 Posts
Don't get me wrong, it's fine to let the truck idle when it's at operating temperature, but not after a cold start when it's chugging away trying to warm up but not being able to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Around here it's not uncommon to see -30 to -40 temps at this time of year. Fortunately for my truck it sits inside a heated garage at night. Unfortunately though my morning commute is only a couple of miles so it doesn't get totally warmed up on working days. I start it and back out, wait about a minute or so and then idle away, keeping the rpms down for the first while. At work it gets plugged in and a 10 minute warmup before going home. All this didn't seem to hurt my 6.5 for the years I had it so I'm hoping I'm not hurting this one too much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
958 Posts
If anyone wants proof that it's not neccesary to let it idle for 10 minutes after a cold-start, my '02 6.5 diesel van is started at 2:00am or 4:30am 6 days a week, idles for a a couple minutes max, then hits the road.. This doesn't say much, but the identical '97 it replaced was given the same treatment every morning for 5 years, it's still going strong and is about to turn 600,000 miles. Puffs a little bit of blue once in a while so the engine is finally starting to show some signs of wear but it still runs like a champ. I dunno if letting it idle for 10 minutes every morning would yield worse results, but I'm certain that a 30 second warmup time is plenty due to the success I've seen doing that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
JohnnyO said:
It's not too good to let your engine idle that long. It causes cylinder wash among other things. The best thing to if it really cold, is to let it idle for a minute, then start driving easy for a couple of miles. It will heat up much faster. A diesel loves being under load.


Unless you have a high idle, a diesel will not warm up idling. The 2003's came with a front cover. I use the just the top cover when it goes below 20 degrees. It works really good at allowing the engine and transmission to warm up quickly.
I was going to ask about cold starting and running and am glad to see someone else did. I just bought my first DMAX and love it but it get cold here also. I have been starting mine and only letting it run for a couple minuets then take off. I was hoping this was the right way to run it. i have noticed that my engine is loud when it is cold and when it warms up after about 5 minuets of driving it quiets down.
One thing though mine did not come with the winter covers. It seems GM does not think Missouri gets cold because they do not furnish a cover here or in other states, this is on their WEB sight. I plan on buying a set of Cloud riders for mine. heard good thing about them and they look good too.
Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
663 Posts
Bjay177 said:
JohnnyO said:
It's not too good to let your engine idle that long. It causes cylinder wash among other things. The best thing to if it really cold, is to let it idle for a minute, then start driving easy for a couple of miles. It will heat up much faster. A diesel loves being under load.



Unless you have a high idle, a diesel will not warm up idling. The 2003's came with a front cover. I use the just the top cover when it goes below 20 degrees. It works really good at allowing the engine and transmission to warm up quickly.
...I have been starting mine and only letting it run for a couple minuets then take off. I was hoping this was the right way to run it. i have noticed that my engine is loud when it is cold and when it warms up after about 5 minuets of driving it quiets down...


... I plan on buying a set of Cloud riders for mine. heard good thing about them and they look good too.
Bill

Bill,


JohnnyO's comments are right-on
... I also start and go easy for the first few miles by watching the oil pressure as a sign of that the engine is starting to warmup. Once the OP starts to drop from it's peak near 100psi, its and indication that the oil is warming up and beginning to flow better. Also, increased startup clatter is normal when temps are 20degF and below... using the block heater will help reduce this initial clatter by warming the heads and cylinder walls.... And dittos on the the Cloud-Rider... it's awesome
... It not only helps the engine warmup quickly and stay warm, I notice people tend to stare at the truck as I go by
... Edited by: jbplock
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
612 Posts
I usually crank mine and let it idle until the amp/volt (can't ever remember which it is
) meter returns to normal ... process usually takes less than a minute ... idle truck out driveway and ease down the road until oil pressure starts to drop ... works for me due to the roads and distance I have to drive to get out to the main highway ....


Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
444 Posts
JEBar said:
I usually crank mine and let it idle until the amp/volt (can't ever remember which it is
) meter returns to normal ... process usually takes less than a minute ... idle truck out driveway and ease down the road until oil pressure starts to drop ... works for me due to the roads and distance I have to drive to get out to the main highway ....

I do the same thing. I just want the oil to circulate to all the parts before putting any load on. Some times I just wait for the seat belt light to stop flashing, then go. It's makes a good timer.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top