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Thanks to the writeup by TheBak, found here:
http://www.dieselplace.com/forum/sho...d.php?t=214076
I had a good idea of what I needed to complete the job. Armed with TheBac's directions, I undertook the job, taking pictures as I went, and making occasional changes.

Here is the TCM. I didn't unplug it. I just let it lay off to the side.




There are four 10mm bolts holding the top of the fan shroud, the two on the driver's side hold the TCM. There are also four plastic push fasteners that connect the top of the shroud to the bottom. I replaced mine with the pictured philips-head fasteners.


Getting the factory ones out is a pain without a special tool. I find it easier to just replace the factory ones with something like this.




Here is the big nut that holds the fan to the pulley. I made a wedge with some rubber material for a good grip. Using a large adjustable wrench, it came off easily.


You can also use a hammer and chisel in place of the air hammer suggested by TheBac. You might use this before the wedge just to loosen things up.


The fan is off.




Here is the fan pulley, front and back.




This connector goes through the hole on the fan pulley. It needs to be removed before you remove the fan pulley.


This tool combination is well worth the money. Since you need the 12 point socket anyway, it isn't much more for this kit with the socket and locking tool. Using this tool means the starter remains untouched. The part with the screw is for 4500 and 5500 trucks. The cost was about $43.00 shipped. I will be happy to send anyone this tool so they can use it. Contact me with a PM for details.


Here is a link to the tool.
http://www.tooltopia.com/lisle-22100.aspx

To insert the tool you remove this inspection plate on the front of the transmission near the transmission filter. It just bends in the middle and pops out.




Here is the opening. The locking tool just slides in.






Now it was time to go after the bolt holding the balancer. I had a choice of tools. I went with the torque wrench...a really BIG torque wrench. My size 11 flip flop gives you an idea of the actual size: 40 inches! I borrowed this from a friend.


Even with this manly tool, I needed to sit on top of the engine, brace my feet on the the inside of the engine compartment and pull REALLY HARD. I had set the torque wrench to 300 ft/lbs to get an idea of how tight the bolt was. It clicked at 300 with no results, and needed an estimated 400 ft/lbs to break it loose. Here is the harmonic balancer. It slid right off. Note that it has a notch that aligns with the pin in the following picture.




Here is the nut that requires the removal of the balancer.


If you are unfortunate enough to have hoses like mine, get ready for some real PITA work. My stock hoses, which I had decided to replace, had the spring clamps molded onto the hoses. This means that when you finally get the very strong hose clamps squeezed with pliers, you still can't get the hose off. After I felt the molded part, I was able to cut it off and remove the clamp. When you cut off the molded part, cut it level with the hose or you'll struggle to get the clamp out of the molded area. Since I was replacing my hoses, I'd cut them off near the clamp to make the job easier. Hose clamp pliers are really helpful with this job. I could not find a set at any of the four parts stores I tried. Here is a link to a set:
http://www.tooltopia.com/lisle-17100.aspx


Time to remove the pump housing. You start with the two bolts on the top of the house. They hold the flange that attaches the pipe that goes to the thermostat housing.


The short section of 3/8 inch hose looked like it needed to be replaced, and it was.


Time to remove the two nuts that connect to the pipe that goes to the oil cooler. The one on the engine-side (the red arrow) is easily accessed from under the front of the truck. The fender-side one (the blue arrow) can be accessed from the left front wheel well after you remove the wheel. You don't need to remove the fender liner.




You'll need a 12mm universal socket or a 12mm socket with a universal coupler. There is not enough room for a deepwell socket. 20'' of extensions was just right.


You can now remove the bolts and nut that hold the pump. It will take some manuevering to get it out. Be careful of o-ring that seals the pipe to the thermostat housing on the top of the pump. This o-ring did not come with my new pump so I re-used it. If you're not careful, it could get nicked.


My housing had the typical pitting caused by electrolosis.


My old pump had been leaking a small amount for a while. Initially you could just smell it, but eventually it leaked enough to leave some Dexcool on the ground. The old one had a rubber squeak when turned indicating the seal was failing.


My replacement pump came with an o-ring to seal the housing to the motor, but no o-ring for the pump to the housing. I reused my old one since it was in good condition. I also had to buy the gasket for the pump to the oil cooler pipe. That one did not come with the pump.

Re-assembly is straight forward, but getting the pump into place takes some work. Just go slow and be sure the o-ring on the pump housing stays in place. (Put the o-ring on the pump housing, not on the engine.) Before you start to wiggle the pump into place, be sure to slide the shorter bolt into hole since once the pump is in place the tube to the thermostat will be in the way.

A large adjustable wrench is used to tighten the fan to the pulley.


Time to put everything back together. The lower half of the fan shroud may have slipped out of place. Note how the two pictures differ. The first one shows the shroud seated correctly, while the other shows the shround out of the notch.




By far the hardest part of this job was removing the old hoses. The lower hose where it connects to the radiator was a real pain. Access is limited and the molded-in clamp was a challenge. I eventually cut the hose off and had to use a die-grinder to cut the clamp.


In case you were wondering, this is why the 36mm socket for the balancer has to be a 12 point.


Finally, don't forget to remove the locking tool and re-install the inspection door.
 

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Bac To The Future
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That Lisle tool set was the best thing to happen to Duramax waterpump replacement, period.

Thanks for the pictures and the shout out. I really should rewrite that DIY to include everyone else's recommendations and add pics.
 

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Outstanding!!! This is what the site is all about...in large part. Where did you get your pump and how much was it? And I can really see what folks are talking about with that pin deal on the balancer. That really should have been keyway'd from GM. Did you replace the small hose in the background?
And finally (whew!) what value did you retorque the balancer too?
 

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Awesome!!! Only if I had this a few months ago
 

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i am so glad you wrote this up. i just got the tool kit in my shop today and was kinda unsure about trying it but i feel a lot better now. now i guess i'll have to order my pump and do the job. one question still on my mind though...with it all torn down is it a good idea to put a fluid dampener on it or if your not running much power, just put the stock back on?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Outstanding!!! This is what the site is all about...in large part. Where did you get your pump and how much was it? And I can really see what folks are talking about with that pin deal on the balancer. That really should have been keyway'd from GM. Did you replace the small hose in the background?
And finally (whew!) what value did you retorque the balancer too?

I got the pump at RockAuto. Very good prices and quick shipping.

http://http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/raframecatalog.php

I did replace the small hose. I heated it in a pan of boiling water prior to installation to make it easier to slip on. A little spit into the hose and working quickly got it on fairly easily.

I torqued it to 275 ft/lbs.

A few other points I thought of:

- Draining my Dexcool was made easier because I was replacing my hoses. I just cut a hole in the lower radiator hose.

- Check the locking tool to be sure it is seated properly before you re-install and torque the bolt. I didn't and it was cocked a little bit from removing the bolt.

- I removed the locking tool when I still had the torque wrench on the bolt. This way you can reverse the engine slightly should the tool be stuck from the torqueing. I didn't have to reverse the engine, but the locking tool was a bit stuck. I just tapped on it and it came out.

- The nuts on the pipe to the oil cooler (see the picture with the red and blue arrows) can be easily removed and started from under the front of the truck. You only need to use the long extensions and universal to break the outter (blue arrow) nut loose and snug it up.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
i am so glad you wrote this up. i just got the tool kit in my shop today and was kinda unsure about trying it but i feel a lot better now. now i guess i'll have to order my pump and do the job. one question still on my mind though...with it all torn down is it a good idea to put a fluid dampener on it or if your not running much power, just put the stock back on?
I'm all stock, so I'll defer this question to those with experience in this area.
 

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WTF.........could GM made it any harder too replace a water pump, never heard of removing a harmonic balancer to get to water pump.....i guess they figure the average D.I.Y. guy is not going to do a water pump themselves, I can remember how easy it is to replace a water pump on a S/B or B/B chevy i guess thats the difference between a gasser and a diesel
 

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Discussion Starter #11
That Lisle tool set was the best thing to happen to Duramax waterpump replacement, period.

Thanks for the pictures and the shout out. I really should rewrite that DIY to include everyone else's recommendations and add pics.

Sorry for the misspelling of the name. I knew it was wrong but push submit before I corrected it.

If you'd like, you can use my pictures to update your post.
 

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WTF.........could GM made it any harder too replace a water pump, never heard of removing a harmonic balancer to get to water pump.....i guess they figure the average D.I.Y. guy is not going to do a water pump themselves, I can remember how easy it is to replace a water pump on a S/B or B/B chevy i guess thats the difference between a gasser and a diesel

Must not have worked on anything built in the last 20 years then. Quite a few vehicles the water pump runs off the timing belt.

This was at least 5 times easier than when I did the one on my 1994 Isuzu
Rodeo.

You should see the water pump on a quad4 what a joke
 

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Well...if you stop and think about the engineering behind placing a gear driven pump on there in the first place...it's not that bad of a design. At least its not on the back of the engine. They aren't going to add a few internal idler gears and a bunch of extra casting/design simply to make it easy on an owner to change out a pump someday, if ever. If they moved it up higher...then something else has to move adding cost. And so on and so forth. This is "optimized" design for placing all the stuff in a compact and weight saving package.

A SB chevy belt driven pump is not in the same league as far as how/where it can be placed. And in general...yes...SB Chevy's are easier to work on in about every single aspect. But its irrelavent. A Willys jeep 4cyl is even easier. But that too is irrelavent.

My 5.9L Cummins truck is the easiest. Remove the belt, remove two bolts and off it comes. And it never wears out. Not part of the fan drive hub.
 

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Must not have worked on anything built in the last 20 years then. Quite a few vehicles the water pump runs off the timing belt.

This was at least 5 times easier than when I did the one on my 1994 Isuzu
Rodeo.

You should see the water pump on a quad4 what a joke
At the time didnt need too......i put a hole through the block:D
 

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Thanks for the pics and details! TheBac and you should meld this for a legit DIY for people as dumb as me. Nice work.
 

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Very nice write up. I did mine in 3.5hrs, start to finish. I took the starter out and did it that way.

Note: you do not need to remove the fan pulley assembly, only remove the fan.
 

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Good Write up! I had been told that the water pump is drivin' off the timing chain but this does not show that. So what does the gear of the pump fit onto? Thanks
 

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Bac To The Future
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WTF.........could GM made it any harder too replace a water pump, never heard of removing a harmonic balancer to get to water pump.....i guess they figure the average D.I.Y. guy is not going to do a water pump themselves, I can remember how easy it is to replace a water pump on a S/B or B/B chevy i guess thats the difference between a gasser and a diesel
The only reason the job is so timeconsuming is that one nut hidden behind the balancer. If Isuzu would have clocked the three attaching points of the w/p just a bit differently, this would be a very easy r/r job.
 

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The only reason the job is so timeconsuming is that one nut hidden behind the balancer. If Isuzu would have clocked the three attaching points of the w/p just a bit differently, this would be a very easy r/r job.
Agreeded, i guess i will have a field day when i do mine;)
 

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You guys will be fine. Make sure you have the proper tools beforehand. All it takes is time.
 
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