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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Called dealer to day to find out how much it would cost to replace my head gaskets. They told me $4,200-$6,000 if I needed new heads. Does this sound right?
 

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They told me $3000 and 32hr to just to headgaskets :eek: :mad:. I hung up the phone and bought a complete takeout motor with 1/3 of the miles mine had for just a bit more :D.
 

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Wow. I don't think you will need new heads....so it should be much less. For 4k I would pull the motor and do it myself. I have no idea what the going rate for a head gasket swap though.

Have you checked into the 200k warantee?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah, I think the guy we talked to was confused between engine warranty and injector warranty. I just keep finding shops that have done very few (if any) D-Max's. Plenty of Dodges though.:D
 

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So I called my buddy Dan and he said that what he has seen is that when the gasket blows alot of times the head will warp. Also, I guess you can't deck the heads due to the higher compression it creates. Not sure if this is gospel just some hearsay from a buddy.

For shops he said possibly H&H Diesel in Fife although this seemed like a longshot since they do medium and heavy duty trucks mostly. He also thought there may be a possibility of a shop in Lynnwood close to 4wheel parts that may be able to do the work, but he didn't have the name.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The dealer is telling me that it's a 50/50 chance on the head. Just called another dealer to compare price and it's the same story, "They have never done one." Dude was not very helpful. What do you think? Should I just have them perform a "leak down test" and fix the one that is bad? 6K is a tough one since I just had the SC installed 5 weeks ago. It was a fun day though.:D I needed some of these afterwards:beerchug:
 

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So I called my buddy Dan and he said that what he has seen is that when the gasket blows alot of times the head will warp. Also, I guess you can't deck the heads due to the higher compression it creates. Not sure if this is gospel just some hearsay from a buddy.

For shops he said possibly H&H Diesel in Fife although this seemed like a longshot since they do medium and heavy duty trucks mostly. He also thought there may be a possibility of a shop in Lynnwood close to 4wheel parts that may be able to do the work, but he didn't have the name.
not sure about the warpage thing due to all the head bolts,but you cant plane them if they are.failed injector sleeve o rings will milkshake the motor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Can you explain how the injector sleeves directly effect a head gasket fail? I just had them done 6K miles ago. Is there something I should be looking at before I bring this in?
 

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If the injector sleeves are leaking, it will have the same pressurizing the coolant just the same as a head gasket, probably more so, So if it is a sleeve leaking, it could be from the injector swap??.......PM Eric at Merchant Auto, he is a knowledgeable person about htis stuff!
 

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Can you explain how the injector sleeves directly effect a head gasket fail? I just had them done 6K miles ago. Is there something I should be looking at before I bring this in?

two o rings seal the coolant in the head should they fail coolant can either enter the crankcase or combustion chamber.there is also a tsb stating the sleeves leak.it still may be a head gasket failure,it would suck to shell out big $$ if its not
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Here's the other issue. I'm not over heating and have no white smoke from exhaust and I don't smell coolant. What it is doing is smoking in the front of the truck. Could this be a small leak?
 

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Subject:Engine Coolant Loss with No Visible Leaks (Reseal Injector Sleeve) #03-06-02-005B - (11/18/2004)
Models:2001-2004 Chevrolet Silverado

2001-2004 GMC Sierra

2003-2004 Chevrolet and GMC C4500/5500 Models

with 6.6L Diesel Engine (VIN1 - RPO LB7)

This bulletin is being revised to add technician cautions. Please discard Corporate Bulletin Number 03-06-02-005A (Section 06-Engine).
Condition

Some owners may comment on engine coolant loss with no visible leaks. Excessive white smoke or a coolant type odor coming from the exhaust pipe, along with low coolant levels, may indicate coolant in the combustion chamber.
Cause

Condition may be caused by engine coolant entering the cylinder due to a dirty or damaged seal between the fuel injector sleeve and the cylinder head.
Correction

Perform the following diagnosis to determine the cause of the coolant loss.
  1. External/Internal Coolant Leaks:
    1.1. Verify that there are no external coolant leaks. Refer to the Loss of Coolant procedure in the Engine Cooling section of the Service Manual.
    1.2. If the vehicle is equipped with an Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) system, inspect the EGR valve and intake system for evidence of internal coolant leakage. Replace the EGR cooler if any condition is found. Refer to Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) Valve Cooler Tube Replacement procedure in the Engine Controls -- 6.6L sub-section of the Service Manual.​
  2. Cooling System Pressurization:


    2.1. On a cold engine with the cooling system depressurized, install the J 24460-01 Radiator Pressure Tester.
    2.2. Start the engine and bring it to operating temperature.
    2.3. Shut off the engine.
    2.4. Using the J 24460-01 Radiator Pressure Tester, bring the cooling system pressure to 15 psi (103 kPa).
    2.5. Allow the engine to cool. Observe for a drop in the cooing system pressure.
    2.6. Disable the fuel system by removing the IGN 1 relay on C/K trucks or the IGN B relay on C4500/5500 trucks using the J 43244 Relay Puller Pliers.
    2.7. Disconnect the 4-wire glow plug control circuit connector from the glow plug relay/controller assembly.
    2.8. Remove the glow plugs. Refer to the Glow Plug Replacement -- Bank 1 and the Glow Plug Replacement -- Bank 2 procedures in the Engine Controls -- 6.6L sub-section of the Service Manual. Inspect for evidence of coolant on the glow plug tips. Note any cylinders that show evidence of coolant leakage.
    Caution: Keep hands and face clear of glow plug holes while cranking. Hot liquid or gases may be expelled during cranking.
    2.9. Place white paper in front of all the glow plug holes and crank the engine over for two compression strokes.
    2.10. Inspect the paper for evidence of coolant and note the appropriate cylinders.
    2.11. Release the pressure from the cooling system and remove the J 24460-01 Radiator Pressure Tester.​
  3. Cylinder Leakage Test:
    3.1. Rotate the engine to bring the cylinder to be tested to Top Dead Center.​



    3.2. Install the J 35667-9 Cylinder Head Leakdown Adapter and the J 35667-A Cylinder Head Leakdown Tester to the cylinder.
    3.3. Apply shop air to the J 3566-7 Cylinder Head Leakdown Tester and adjust according to the manufacturer's instructions.
    3.4. Inspect for excessive cylinder leakage and air bubbles in the cooling system.
    3.5. Repeat steps 3.1 through 3.4 for each cylinder. Note any cylinders that indicate leakage.​
  4. Inspection and Repair:
    4.1. Remove the fuel injector sleeves of the cylinders that show evidence of coolant leakage. Refer to the Fuel Injector Sleeve Replacement procedure in the Engine Mechanical -- 6.6L sub-section of the Service Manual.
    4.2. Inspect the inside of the fuel injector sleeve for damage to the fuel injector sealing surface. Damage to this portion of the fuel injector sleeve may indicate a loose injector caused by improper tightening or a missing copper washer. A loose injector will allow the fuel injector and the fuel injector sleeve to bounce inside the cylinder head, resulting in coolant leakage to the cylinder. If damage is found, replace the affected components.​



    4.3. Inspect the tapered sealing surface of the cylinder head and the fuel injector sleeve (1) for evidence of machining debris, carbon tracking, improper machining or damage. If improper machining or damage is found, replace the affected component. If there is machining debris found on the fuel injector sleeve or cylinder head sealing surfaces, clean the debris and reinstall the fuel injector sleeve. Refer to Fuel Injector Sleeve Replacement in the Engine Mechanical -- 6.6L sub-section of the Service Manual.
    4.4. If no debris or damage is found on the fuel injector sleeve or the fuel injector sleeve bore in the cylinder head, remove the cylinder head and inspect the cylinder head and gasket for damage. Replace components as necessary.​
 

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So I called my buddy Dan and he said that what he has seen is that when the gasket blows alot of times the head will warp. Also, I guess you can't deck the heads due to the higher compression it creates. Not sure if this is gospel just some hearsay from a buddy.

For shops he said possibly H&H Diesel in Fife although this seemed like a longshot since they do medium and heavy duty trucks mostly. He also thought there may be a possibility of a shop in Lynnwood close to 4wheel parts that may be able to do the work, but he didn't have the name.
yup sounds right to me. they don't warp much but 6-7 thousandths is all it takes.
 

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Here's the other issue. I'm not over heating and have no white smoke from exhaust and I don't smell coolant. What it is doing is smoking in the front of the truck. Could this be a small leak?

"Smoking in front of the truck"... Do you mean there's steam coming out of the front of the truck? Is it near the passenger's side fender or more from the center of the grill?

If it's puking coolant from the overflow hose (passenger side fender area) then it could be an injector sleeve or head gasket, or even something as simple as a bad radiator cap. If it's steaming from the front of the engine, it could be a leak in the coolant line that goes to the turbo from the water pump right behind the fan pulley. There's a small section of hose there and they have been VERY prone to rotting out from the Dexcool.

The injector sleeves have a press-fit with loctite seal between the coolant and combustion chamber, and the 2 o-rings separate the coolant passage from the top of the heads under the valve covers (oil). The TSB that was posted relates to a leak from the coolant into the combustion chamber and this can cause the same pressurization of the coolant system that is caused by a blown headgasket. Usually the truck won't warm up correctly in either of these situations, the needle will sit at 160 for a long time, or jump around, etc. Most people have experienced it sitting at 160 all the time though.

Explain the symptoms with a bit more detail and we'll get a better idea of what's going on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Sure does. If I read this correctly, it is very likely that it is the injector sleeves. I just had mine done 6K miles ago. Shouldn't the stealer pick this up? Please advise.

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
JCG,

The symptoms that I am having would be that I seem to have smoke coming from the front of the truck. It doesn't seem to smell like coolant and I am no longer dumping coolant out the over flow hose. It actually smells like diesel up front. My truck runs at 160 on flat ground and 210 when pulling a hill. Just had injectors installed 6K. What do you think?
 
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