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Discussion Starter #1
I originally purchased my 3500 dually for pulling a 5th wheel trailer but subsequently switched to an Airstream travel trailer. The tongue weight on the Airstream, loaded, is only about 1,000 lbs. Even with other gear that I'll be carrying in the bed, the rear end of the 3500 is still too high and I have far too much capacity. I love the dually - and the stability it offers for towing. What I would like to do is to modify the rear suspension to bring the truck level. Lowering shackles alone will bring the secondary springs into contact with the chassis bearings, stiffening the ride and beating up the Airstream (---as well as the wife and I!) Removing the secondary springs would appear to a relatively simple fix - perhaps requiring nothing more than new U-bolts? I searched for information to see if anyone else had done anything similar - but with no luck. Is there any difference between the primary spring set on a 2500 and that on a 3500? If not, the U-bolts from a 2500 would probably work. I would hope to keep the procedure "reversible." Your suggestion would be appreciated.Edited by: Cracker
 

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Cracker,


You can remove the lowest spring from a 3500 and pick up about an inch. You can order Velvet Rides (spring Shackle torsion ride) (still being engineered for 3500s) and pick up another 1 1/2 inches.


Good luck,


Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm going to make another stab at this question and see if anybody can offer any suggestions. I previously asked about using the U-bolts from a 2500 - but what if I used the whole spring pack from a 2500??? Is there any difference between the 3500 chassis suspension points and those on the 2500 - i.e. are the springs the same length? I would think that the spring arc would be substantially different - which is, of course, exactly what causes my dilemma. I would rather go this route than to use the 3" drop shackles offered by Bell-Tec and remove the overload leafs. In my opinion, using longer shackles on the rear hangar alone would upset the driveline geometry slightly.


Cracker
 

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Cracker said:
... In my opinion, using longer shackles on the rear hangar alone would upset the driveline geometry slightly.

You lost me on this one. Longer shackles increase height not lower it. What am I missing here?
 

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On a tension shackle it will lower it, on a compression shackle it will raise it.
 

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Why not remove the stops the overloads hit so they do not affect your suspension and this should lower the rear of the truck when the hitch is loaded?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Blue Max:


Removing the stops would work if heavily loaded - but my problem is that, most of the time, I'll be running fairly light for a 3500. I'm not near as concerned about the ride quality as I am the high rear end. In truth I like the solid ride of the 3500 but, as mentioned before, it's tough on the Airstream trailer when travelling on poor roads. Most of the time will be spent on Interstate Highways and primary roads - although the condition some of those roads are in makes them worst than a country lane!


Cracker
 

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Maybe I am crazy to sugesst this, but why modify your truck. Why not just adjust your hitch. You will be much happier I think. I would never modify my truck's suspension to fit my trailer. Always the other way around.


My 2¢
Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Redapple:


I've got the hitch set to the right height to keep the trailer level. I just like the idea of the truck riding level too.


Cracker
 

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Seems like most folks leveling their rigs are cranking the torsion bars to raise the front. Sounds a lot easier than lowering the rear, IMHO.
 
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