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DaTech, i've been looking at the cryogenicly frozen rotors,any experience? I'm trying to stop the rotor 1/2 moon splitting that we have happend twice.Not a fun situation for the driver.





Tom L.
 

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Tom, too be quite honest, I am not familier with the cyro rotors. If you have some info on them, email it to me or post if you want. I would like to review it. Where exactly are you breaking rotors? Thats alot of metal to split. Your trucks 2wd or 4wd? PS, nice sig
 

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Tom,


It's pretty common practice to "freeze" crankshafts on road racing motorcycles, I'm not sure how it works, but for some reason they are far less likely to break than ones that are not frozen. Again apples and oranges, but there is apparently something to this freezing process.


Jody
 

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They do it with axle shafts also. Has something to do with hardness.
 

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Ah, material science, something I know a little about. Okay, there are several factors to temp treating. Factors include how hot it gets or how cold, the time to return to amient (fast or slow), temp cycling, the material itself. You can "quench" a material (cool it fast) to make it harder, but more brittle. You can create a surface that is hard, but the interior is more elastic, tempering. One example is a chisle. The tip is very hard, but the end you strike will deform into a mushroom with plastic deformation. This is because the hard time is quenched in oil and the other end is allowed to cool at a normal rate. You get a gradient of hardness from one end to the other. It is also the reason you do not want to get the tip too hot when you shapen it. Jominy end quench is the technical term. The changes to the materials happen as they cool, not due to heat (unless you go high enough to affect a phase change).


Most cryo treatments are done with liquid nitrogen (-332*F) You can also use liquid helium which is even colder at -442*F. The advantage to cryo is it will treat all of the metal instead of just the surface. The material will have the stresses released which in turn will give more dimentional stability, durability and hardness due to the carbon being more evenly distributed through the steel. That leads back to the material itself, how much carbon and other alloy materials are in it. Grain size, cold working, etc. can also affect the final part.



Broker, the short answer is they are better than a standard machined rotor. My buddy uses them on his race car to reduce the warping from the high heat and stress he puts on them.


Note: This is from memory and it has been a while since I studied this in great detail. I might be slightly off on some of this info, so if you find a mistake, just correct me, my Nomex undies are at the cleaners.
 

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Interesting post, from everyone. The responses were clear and to the point. There is a blacksmith group locally, I've been to their meetings. They had formed some tools specifically for stripping bark off trees to use in Log Homes. They wanted to harden them so they put them in a blast furnace and heated them til they lost their magnetic qualities. then threw them in a tank full of Transmission fluid, to cool them down. Later they used an accetalyne torch to spot heat them to take the brittleness out of the metal, yet not lose the hardness. They judged the tempering by the color change in the metal, and using a file to test the ability to file a sharp edge on the cutting end. I find all of this very interesting, and can see there is lots to learn about auto parts, other than simply going to the local parts store.


Keep up the good work.
 

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Thanks for all the replies.I'm trying to figure out all the vendors also.


Give me sometime here and i'll let you know what i went with.
 

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Tom





Try looking here and calling these guys.


http://www.carbotecheng.com/prod-ct-cryocool.htm


The specialize in race stuff but the guy really knows his stuff and I'm sure he will not have rotors in stock for our trucks but might work with you on making up a set.
 

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Tom, Shoot me an e-mail as I know a guy in Watertown
that is big into cryo freezing rotors and motor parts.
 
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