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Is the principle the same on diesel as it is for gas. Cooler denser air = more power or does diesel require warmer air to work better. Edited by: cwolfe
 

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I would have to say cool more dense air. On my last truck I had a boost guage, and when it was really cold out side the boost guage would show a good 2 to 3 psi higher. Our diesels depend on air and fuel. If the air is less dense than we are taking it(air) away from the combustion process.Edited by: NoWake200
 

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That is what I thougth to. But a guy I work with has a new do*g* and was talking about how his has a heater in the air intake path and it helps with performance because diesels need warm air not cool. I still think cool air is better though.
 

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I have talked to a couple of people about this and my understanding is that there is an "ideal" temperature range. I am not sure what it is yet unfortunately. The reason that I say this is there is a Bra that you can get for your diesel truck that is designed to reduce the air flow over the engine so that the temperature under the hood stays wormer. It is really only for people who live in ultracold winter climates. Here in Cali. we don't have to worry about it that much unless we head up to Tahoe or somthing. I have seen big rigs with these on them as well that travel over the Sierras. This leads me to belive that there is an "ideal" temperature range for the air that is being taken into the engine. It is not just "colder is better". I would also ask your friend if he meant that it had a fuel heater rather than an air intake heater. I have not heard of this but that, by no means, means that it does not exist as I am very new to diesel engines as well.


Enjoy,


MikeEdited by: 1BIG4X4
 

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I think we have an intercooler to "cool" the turbocharged air.
 

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Hot engine Cool air. Hot engine helps to ignite the diesel fuel. Cold dense intake air helps by having more oxygen in the cylinder more oxygen better burn. Gas engine runs better cooler because of the spark that ignites the air / fuel misture.
 

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The D-max, like the Cummins, has a grid heater in the intake to reduce smoking at startup. . . .a certain amount of heat is required for clean cumbustion.


Both also have intercoolers for a cooler, more dense air charge at high power levels.
 

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This "range" must be fairly wide! I've been too busy/lazy to get my cold front on yet this year and the outside temps have been between -18 and + 8 for the past 3 weeks or so and have not had any issues that I can note. No performance changes that I could perceive. Hope to get it installed tonight but I'm surprised the lack of one didn't cause any problems. Even appeared to warm up with about the same speed.
 

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GM claims the cold front is to make your cabin heat work better. They do not claim that it will improve performance.


 

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Cruz_Man said:
Hot engine Cool air. Hot engine helps to ignite the diesel fuel. Cold dense intake air helps by having more oxygen in the cylinder more oxygen better burn. Gas engine runs better cooler because of the spark that ignites the air / fuel misture.

I agree 100%. Density is also a factor of humity....if you have a high humity day no matter what the temp is the moisture will give you a less dense air mass for your engine to work with. But the turbo takes care of that for you.
 

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What I experience once the temps get up to 80/90 I see a significent drop in performance,worse with humidty .... Once the cool summer nights and fall afternoons of 50/60 degrees come back this thing is back to a rocket and then some ....So cooler denser air = More Power ....

Mac
 

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I agree with a lot of what's been said. Power wise I usually run empty so the turbo makes up for it unless it's really hot. I believe colder is not better. Mileage wise my truck's sweet spot is 45 to 70. Once the temps drop below 40 so does the mileage. I'm running Artic Diesel that is not a #1 blend and is rated for 45 cetane. Even with Arctic I can get summer mileage until the temp drops. The same thing happened last year. I ran a couple tanks of straight #2 late in the season and once the temps dropped into the 20's it didn't help having straight #2.


The only thing the winter cover does for me is faster warm ups and the engine runs closer to the thermostat temp.
 
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