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I had a salesman (Ford Power Stroke) ... told me all diesels should run a conditioner in the fuel. He says the new low sulpher fuel doesn't have enough lubricant to keep the engine in good shape. My dealer has never said anything about needing to add a conditioner.
What is the "right" thing to do>>? conditioner or No conditioner..
 

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Do a quick search for additives or conditioners. I am sure there is alot of information to be found - then you can make the call :)
 

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from what I understood if you ran the previous fuel with conditioner for a few tanks you'd be fine with the new stuff. However, if the new stuff is all that has been used you should use an additive to lubricate the injectors better due to the lack of it now. Stanadyne and Racor are approved by GM.

by the way.. it can't hurt! If anything it helps performance and longevity.
 

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Always run a good diesel fuel additive with today's diesel. Also look into a bio-diesel blend for added lubricity and cleaning. Always use your search function on these types of questions!;)
 

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The Furd salesman was dead-on,unfortunately,most of these guys are simply order takers-they know diddly squat about the product they are selling.I always run Howe's Lubricator in each tank,year round--you can usually find it in any truck stop."YOU GO OR HOWES PAYS THE TOW":grd:
 

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Unfortunately howes lubricator doesn't provide the boundary lubrication needed for our injectors. You need an organo-metallic compound that binds tot he metal not just some naptha... Stanadyne has a lubricity test on their website with various brands. Stanadyne performance formula or Stanadyne Lubricity Formula (aka "World Blend").

jeff
 

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Also, we have no idea yet what kind of additive package will be added to the new fuel. We can't simply extrapolate from what we presently have coming out of the pump (which does have an additive package added before we get it). Not that I advocate that but, I've seen more than one with over 200K with never an additive in it and no problems.
 

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Just put some 2 cycle in it.
 

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What lubricity agents does that have in it? See dmaxlover's post above.
Don't have a clue. Almost everything you put in the tank has some sort of petroleum distillates in them. Basically a big word for oil. If you want a boost in cetane then thats different. I just want everything to stay lubicated.
 

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Don't have a clue. Almost everything you put in the tank has some sort of petroleum distillates in them. Basically a big word for oil. If you want a boost in cetane then thats different. I just want everything to stay lubicated.
Diesel is oil. 2 cycle oil is oil. Most lubricity agents aren't simply oil (petroleum distillates). One thing for sure - 2 cycle doesn't stink like these additives do!:D Try getting a single drop of Stanadyne or FPPF on the floor of your truck.-:t
 

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Unfortunately howes lubricator doesn't provide the boundary lubrication needed for our injectors. You need an organo-metallic compound that binds tot he metal not just some naptha... Stanadyne has a lubricity test on their website with various brands. Stanadyne performance formula or Stanadyne Lubricity Formula (aka "World Blend").

jeff[/q uote]

Um Jeff--You are quite off-base about Howes not meeting our injectors needs.It does or myself and countless others would'nt be using it.I've got app.110K miles on 2 DM's now,with no running problems other than my injector changes on my LB7,but that was to be expected.As far as "binding",I think your using wrong terminollogy--it's not glue,it's supposed to lubricate and no,it's not just some naptha.As for your testing,I guarantee you all testers are flawed somewhat--different testers will come up with different results and by the way that testing was done 10 years ago.I've never knocked another additive here on DP,but do you think it's possible Stanadyne made their product primarily to combat their absolute garbage fuel pumps they made for GM working ability???
 

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"Um Jeff--You are quite off-base about Howes not meeting our injectors needs.It does or myself and countless others would'nt be using it.I've got app.110K miles on 2 DM's now,with no running problems other than my injector changes on my LB7,but that was to be expected.As far as "binding",I think your using wrong terminollogy--it's not glue,it's supposed to lubricate and no,it's not just some naptha.As for your testing,I guarantee you all testers are flawed somewhat--different testers will come up with different results and by the way that testing was done 10 years ago.I've never knocked another additive here on DP,but do you think it's possible Stanadyne made their product primarily to combat their absolute garbage fuel pumps they made for GM working ability???"

It’s sometimes difficult to say that because a truck has gone x amount of trouble free miles that it can be attributed to any one thing. I know a couple of people that have in excess of 200,000 on their trucks without ever using additives. That doesn’t mean it’s best to run without them and in the same way it doesn’t mean if a truck that has seen a lot of trouble free miles using brand y additive that it’s best to run with it. (Much more daring is that my two friends have always had the dealer do all their maintenance, e.g., oil and lube, etc.! :eek: Now that’s scary to me!)

As to Howes, all I know is that it provided little more lubricity than the control fuel, when tested by Southwest Research Institute. One thing for sure is that Southwest is not only the largest (as I recall) lab and testing company of it’s kind in the country but has always had a spotless, and I assume well earned, reputation. I believe the accepted standard test for lubricity is the same today as it was 10 years ago. If Howes has changed, what was changed about it? I know if I had a product that did poorly in a test performed by a prestigious company like Southwest, I’d work on the formula and have it tested again by the same lab that tested it before. I can think of no better way to bolster the image of a product. The old “New and Improved” slogan still catches the eye.

I would have to defer to people working in the field but, it’s my understanding as well that some of these lubricity agents “coat”, or “cling to” the steel in the injector pump and are not simply something “slippery” added to the diesel oil. I know that in regards to some corrosion inhibitors used in diesel additives, they generally (organic acids) contain
a carboxylate group with one or more corrosion inhibitors chemically anchored to an aluminum oxyhydroxide surface through the carboxylate group. In short, they will “coat the metals” and “convert the beginnings of any rust”, so to speak. We have a couple of people on the forum that know far more than I in regards to lubricity agents and organic chemistry in general. Perhaps they’ll provide some light for us.

Regarding your statement that different testers will come up with different results: If the same test is performed within the same parameters, the results should be the same.

In addition, it’s my understanding Stanadyne doesn’t, and never has, made the additive they sell. It’s not my intention to disparage Howes or any other product. If you feel better using it, great! Just wanted to clarify a few statements made earlier.
 

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Actually my owners manuel says not to add anything to the fuel. The manuel goes on to state that if i feel under special circumstances that i need something added to the fuel then i need to contact the dealer for advice. I think i will follow the manuel from GM, If anything happens then its their dollar and not mine but i feel like they just may know what they are talking about. So far truck runs great , 7,000 miles. Of course i live in Texas and not much cold weather down here.
 

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Actually my owners manuel says not to add anything to the fuel. The manuel goes on to state that if i feel under special circumstances that i need something added to the fuel then i need to contact the dealer for advice. I think i will follow the manuel from GM, If anything happens then its their dollar and not mine but i feel like they just may know what they are talking about. So far truck runs great , 7,000 miles. Of course i live in Texas and not much cold weather down here.
hrleyrider--Can you spell low sulphur fuel?Additives are not just for anti-gelling.Sure,your ride will run and probably fine for quite a while,but then it just might bite you in the a**.You definitely should use some kind of treatment.Are you going to wait for GM to send you a revised addendum to your quote above that" now because of the further reduction of sulphur in diesel nation-wide,please start using fuel treatment in your Duramax engine?":exactly:
 

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Tuney and I don't always see eye to eye but he couldn't be any more right. Additives, especially for lubricity, are cheap insurance.
 

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I would agree somewhat if the additive has been proven to actually increase lubricity. By proof I mean tested by accepted standards by a truly independent lab. Some additives apparently interfere with the chemical treatment on the filter elements while others do very little and most remain untested. What would be great is if they were tested and graded such that oil is. As it is, anyone can throw together a few things and market it while making most any claims they want. Many products are “tested” by a “lab” that is set up by the very company making the product with the sole purpose of saying “Our product “A” has been tested and “approved” by lab “B”?? It happens everyday and is perfectly legal. Perhaps I'm just too skeptical.:eek::

If the engineering teams at GM, Cummins, Bosch, and others thought additives were needed, I’d surely surmise they’d be advising us to use them. These three companies all state they recommend not using them and feel confident enough to give us a 100k guaranty.


As to the upcoming ultra low sulfur fuel, we have no idea as yet what kind of additive package it will come with. It's all speculation at this point. I find it very difficult to believe they'll be bringing it to the stations without reformulating the additive package. Can increasing lubricity above what we get from the pump increase the life of the injector pump? I don’t know but, sure tend to think so. Do they all increase lubricity? I’m very skeptical about that. Will our trucks fall apart without it? Ask strangers filling up next to you at the station and you might find close to 90% don’t use any and have had no problems. All being said, I use an additive for added lubricity.
 

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At the risk of sounding like a broken record, run 2% biodiesel and lubricity will no longer be a concern, ULSD or not.
 

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:exactly:
 

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At the risk of sounding like a broken record, run 2% biodiesel and lubricity will no longer be a concern, ULSD or not.
Sounds great! Where do I find it though? From CA to NY and back recently and I have yet to see it anywhere. Maybe someday soon it will be as widespread as ethanol in gas is now. And 2% is all that's needed? That's encouraging! Will be on the lookout for it. I know absolutely nothing about biodiesel. Is it possible to mix clean vegtable oil in the diesel at such a small amount as 2% or does it take processing it first?
 
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