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Administrator Mister, your truck's smoking...
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Discussion Starter #1
Have you guys ever worked with cold patch - the blacktop-in-a-bag? I'm wondering how long it takes to set? Any clue?
 

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It works alright. What are you trying to fix? Pot holes?

Where I use it is potholes. I set the stuff out in the sun for at least a few hours to get it good and hot before I try to use it. I think that is one reason the bags are usually black, soak up the sun. If its below about 70*F forget it. If the ambient temp is 80 or higher and you get a few hours in the sun you should be good.

The place I use it is mostly gravel and can get a few hundred cars a day. I sweep out as much dust or loose gravel as I can. If there are big chunks and the hole is deep enough sometimes I leave the chunks in.

I then pour it in trying to estimate how much will leave it slightly overfilled which can be tricky because what seems to work best for me is to leave it in a mound to kinda spread out on its own which is where the making sure its good and warm is the key. I give it about 1/2 hour to kinda settle on its own then go after it with a garden hoe to spread it out then hit it with an about 8" square tamper. Thats about it. You can drive on it right away. Not sure if the helps me that there is gravel 6' away so the dust gets on it fairly quick so its not sticky on top. By the next day I sometimes can't tell what were the recent patches.
 

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Administrator Mister, your truck's smoking...
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Discussion Starter #3
It works alright. What are you trying to fix? Pot holes?

Where I use it is potholes. I set the stuff out in the sun for at least a few hours to get it good and hot before I try to use it. I think that is one reason the bags are usually black, soak up the sun. If its below about 70*F forget it. If the ambient temp is 80 or higher and you get a few hours in the sun you should be good.

The place I use it is mostly gravel and can get a few hundred cars a day. I sweep out as much dust or loose gravel as I can. If there are big chunks and the hole is deep enough sometimes I leave the chunks in.

I then pour it in trying to estimate how much will leave it slightly overfilled which can be tricky because what seems to work best for me is to leave it in a mound to kinda spread out on its own which is where the making sure its good and warm is the key. I give it about 1/2 hour to kinda settle on its own then go after it with a garden hoe to spread it out then hit it with an about 8" square tamper. Thats about it. You can drive on it right away. Not sure if the helps me that there is gravel 6' away so the dust gets on it fairly quick so its not sticky on top. By the next day I sometimes can't tell what were the recent patches.
If you look elsewhere in the forum, I recently had my garage floor leveled by one of the concrete hydraulic lifting guys come over and put a truckload and a half of concrete slurry in to fill voids caused by years of water erosion due to some holes in my asphalt driveway leading directly under my garage floor. To get me to the spring when I can have the driveway repaved and have the water runoff sloped away from the garage, I have put 3 bags of cold patch in place to slope the water away and to fill holes leading to the underneath of my garage floor. I was forced to put bag #3 down just 2 days ago... and it was most certainly not 80 degrees outside.

I believe the brand name of the cold patch I've been buying is QPR from Lowes... and the bag claims you can put it down in cold weather... all the way to 20 degrees F or lower (can't remember the exact details). I bought a long-handled heavy tamper I've used to pack/crush the stuff once it's down. It's in a hermetically-sealed foil bag, and when it first comes out it's as pliable as sand. Once it's packed down, it seems to set up pretty fast, but in all 61+ years of my life, this past 3 months mark my very first direct experience with anything pertaining to asphalt; other than paying someone to seal my drive a few years ago, I'm like Sgt. Schultz - "I know nothing, nothing!"

The stuff I'm using sounds nothing like the stuff you're describing above. Not like that's a bad thing, just maybe a thing... :confuzeld
 

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I'm not sure if its the same stuff or not. Sounds like not but you have me curious now, maybe later I will have to do some reading and see what the differences are. I usually use the Quikrete brand stuff from home depot but I see they also have a product that comes in a pail that has a similar description. The place I use it is a summer business so having to use it or something similar in cooler temps has never been a concern.

It does seem like the bag could be sealed so maybe there is some sort of air reaction thing going on but its apparently got to be spread out to harden. I have had bags tear open during transport or storage that I have not used right away and they don't seem to harden in the bag. Even in a sealed bag you get to about 40*F and its hard as a rock. I have a few bags that I didn't use in the fall that were sitting in the truck bed since late summer. They have been sitting in the garage since mid October and still have the ribs in them from the bed of the truck. I'm sure once it warms up they will be soft again.
 

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Administrator Mister, your truck's smoking...
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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I'm not sure if its the same stuff or not. Sounds like not but you have me curious now, maybe later I will have to do some reading and see what the differences are. I usually use the Quikrete brand stuff from home depot but I see they also have a product that comes in a pail that has a similar description. The place I use it is a summer business so having to use it or something similar in cooler temps has never been a concern.

It does seem like the bag could be sealed so maybe there is some sort of air reaction thing going on but its apparently got to be spread out to harden. I have had bags tear open during transport or storage that I have not used right away and they don't seem to harden in the bag. Even in a sealed bag you get to about 40*F and its hard as a rock. I have a few bags that I didn't use in the fall that were sitting in the truck bed since late summer. They have been sitting in the garage since mid October and still have the ribs in them from the bed of the truck. I'm sure once it warms up they will be soft again.
It's definitely different stuff... QPR can be used to -5 degrees F and up to 105 degrees F. Here's a link to the stuff I've used: https://www.lowes.com/pd/QPR-50-lb-Asphalt-Patch/3656652

If I had read the specs, it states the cure time is 334 hours, which is just shy of 14 days... though it states you can put this stuff right into a water-filled pot hole... so cure time may be a bit subjective. Oh well...
 

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When I used it after tamping I laid a sheet of plywood over and drove on it to compact it better. Held up for several years before having my drive repaved.
 

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Interesting idea with the plywood, were you using the stuff with the narrow workable temp range like me or the wide range stuff?
 
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