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I spoke to a fuel trucker who was delivering fuel today. He informed me the new style fuel pumps at the CITCO and SUNOCO stations have better filtration than any other in use.


Does anyone have an details on the filteration specs for these pumps?
 

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I don't know about that, but I buy citgo diesel here all the time. It seems to me that there fuel gives me the most power and mpg. I also got an email the other day that said they are one of the only companies that does not import their oil.
 

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I fuel up at a Sunoco station on a main highway that sees lots of truckers so the fuel is used up quickly, I also use this station because the pumps have a large external mounted filter on the pump hose. There is another Sunoco station in my neighborhood which has new style pumps but I see no external filter. Is all diesel fuel required to have filters on the pumps, could they have a filter located inside the pump cabinet somewhere, I never can find the owner of the station when I'm there no one knows. Thanks
 

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The tank-trucker filling this truck stop's four-10,000 gallon tanks told me the new style pumps have internal filters far superior to anything else currently in use. That's just word of mouth, but from a professional in the business.


Truck Stops sell huge amounts of diesel. The crap in the bottom of storage tanks gets stirred up every time they get filled and this is much more often than other places, and pump filtration takes out the stuff that floats, and that makes those tanks far cleaner simply due to the volume of fuel going through them. If you piss in a bath tub, the water will get dirtier than if you piss in a swimming pool.


Ask the people delivering fuel. How often do they get fuel deliveries? How much fuel do they sell in a month? How big are your tanks?


Slow pumps mean old, clogged up filters. Fast fills are important to me because I run big tanks in my trucks. So maybe that is why my filters have held up so well. Part of it was dumb luck--wanting cheaper fuel, using truck stops, and having bad luck with smaller places.


I've noticed the fuel filtration study posted elsewhere on the board, showed a huge difference in the quality of the fuel that people started with. When you talk about filtration, first consider the filter attached to the pump! You can look at it as if it were a secondary filter on your truck. It is at least as important as the OEM filter on your truck.


Look for three things when shopping for well filtered pump fuel:


1. Look for the newest style pumps. I'll try to remember to post a picture of one of these--they are very cool looking. It stands to reason, engineers will make improvements to pumps, and the filter would be the one area that would provide big improvements. At least, a brand new pump will have a new filter.


2. Use only high volume truck stops because they cycle their fuel often. The worst fuel I bought was from a mom and pop place where I picked up so much water my truck started running bad immediately. Perhaps I was taking on the dregs of the tanks. Since then I've only used big truck stops. At a smaller places, I only buy enough fuel to get me to a truck stop. Small places charge more for fuel. If the price is high, the fuel is probably not good. High volume places have fuller storage tanks. Finally, if word got out that a truck stop had bad fuel, that word would spread fast and truckers would go elsewhere.


3. Only use fast pumping pumps. This could mean n
 

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We have several new Shell stations near interstate off ramps with "Premium Diesel". These stations cannot accommodate large trucks. These stations have new pumps with new tanks, but the volume cannot compare to the truck stops used by truckers. The pump cabinets are in the same enclosure as the gasoline units. Do these pumps have a filter? In a situation such as this, is there a good chance that the diesel would be contaminated with gasoline at some point, or is the filling connections for the tanks designed to prevent this occurrence?
 

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Night Sailor,


That is some good info.
I was just talking to a 'tanker' yesturday about tanks and all stuff inside them. He said all the new stops/stations are safe, because they have new tanks that have some kind of coating inside them. I would have to agree with volume of fuel sold...I had my system gel up on me once...it was fuel from a small Mobil station that does not move much. Never again.
 

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I'm about 11 miles from the closest interstate truck stop, and if I get over there, I always buy at the Love Travel Plaza. They give a penny discount for my Good Sam card. They also have a web site where you can locate the station nearest you and it carries the pump price also, updated every 15 mins.


If I'm buying here in Griffin, I buy at Wally World, it's a new super store with a Murphy Oil station. Pumps, tanks, etc. are new, and if you buy a Wal Mart shopping card ahead of time, you get a 3 cent discount. I'll keep an eye out for any external filter, the pump is in the same console as the gas pump, and they do sell quite a lot of diesel fuel.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
antt said:
We have several new Shell stations near interstate off ramps with "Premium Diesel". These stations cannot accommodate large trucks. These stations have new pumps with new tanks, but the volume cannot compare to the truck stops used by truckers. The pump cabinets are in the same enclosure as the gasoline units. Do these pumps have a filter? In a situation such as this, is there a good chance that the diesel would be contaminated with gasoline at some point, or is the filling connections for the tanks designed to prevent this occurrence?

I've read that the Premium Diesel has a higher cetane rating so I guess that means more energy and better fuel mileage. I'm not convinced it is worth the extra price. It would depend on whether the cost per mile for fuel was better or worse. Perhaps someone has experimented with this on a tank or two.


If the pumps are new. I think the fuel would be fine to use. However, my gut instinct tells me to stick with the truck stops for fast pumps and better quality fuel. Sometimes I see stations next to truck stops offering cheaper diesel. My inclination is to still go with the truck stops as the difference is often only a penny a gallon.


I've been treated rudely by a number Arab's working in small service stations. I paid for fuel and the assholes would not turn on the pumps. Once I walked back from pump to building three times! Each time they wave and smile and assured me the pump was on. It was clear to me, I was being deliberately provoked until I was furious. So I avoid situations like that, vote with my feet, and take my business elsewhere.


When travelling I look for big truck stops. I've had nothing but pleasurable friendly business dealings with the helpful people who run them. Often, they let you fill up without paying in advance. This is more true out west and that saves a trip to the cashier. The nearest truck stop to me is about 17 miles away. I go that way at least once a month, and I have a 53 gallon tank so I don't need to get there often.


The tankers fill the gas and diesel tanks seperately. You will see little mounds with plates about 10" in diameter--each painted a different color. The underground tanks are color coded. I think that may vary by company brand. I can't swear to all the details, I think diesel fuel storage tank covers are usually yellow, and a tanker out in Phoenix told me (if I remember correctly) Red/White/Blue were used for the various grades of gasoline. Something is not right with this, because I've seen green also.


The tanker's pop these covers off and then spin off a 5" cap underneath--I suspect it is a bayonette cap like the hoses have. They then fill these underground tanks with those big 5" hoses.


I would not worry about gas getting mixed in with diesel. I once did a partial fill up with unleaded gas in my first diesel and it did not harm the truck. I drove it and mixed in more diesel as quickly as possible and it came out fine.
 
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