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Discussion Starter #1
There have been some questions about greasing and suspension component failure. I hope this may help.


So You Want to Grease Your Truck!
You might think grease is just grease. But there's as much chemistry built into the formula of greases as there is in engine oils and gear oils
Grease is a complex of 4 items:
<UL style="MARGIN-TOP: 0in" =disc>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in">Base oil</LI>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in">Base complex (“Soap”)</LI>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in">Tackifier</LI>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in">Additives</LI>[/list]
Base Oil:
The ingredient of grease that actually does the lubricating.

Base Complex (Thickeners):
To create grease, a thickener or “soap” is added to the oil. Thickeners are used to create more solid greases that stay where you want them. The most common thickener in the automotive market is lithium.

Tackifiers:
Make grease stick better.

Additives:
Prevent rust and corrosion and allow better performance at extreme temperatures. Additives such as molybdenum disulfide ("moly") or asphalt may be used for extra metal-to-metal wear protection under extreme conditions.

The National Lubricating Grease Institute (NLGI) provides standard ratings and certification for grease. Different thicknesses are designated with NLGI ratings from 6 (thick) to 000, which is very fluid. NLGI No. 2 is typically used in chassis applications.
NLGI GC-LB is
 

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I am guilty of the over filling of the boot. Have I done damage by pumping in grease until you see it begin to come out around the boot. Not excessive but just to that point. I will be honest. I was never taught how to do this correctly. Just knew it needed to be done on regular basis, every other oil change. Love this site for this simple reason. You grow up thinking your way is the only way only to find out there are several things you do just because that is how your Dad did it and his Dad did it, etc...





Good topic JohnnyO
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Bowhunter -
You should be ok. Try to lightly squeeze the boot to get the excess grease out so the boot contracts again. Then try to squeeze to boot so it sits tight on the metal part again. The problem comes when the boot was expanded too long and now it’s deformed and stretched and does not seal well.


Your dad was not doing it wrong. Years ago the type of joint and cover that was made permitted this. In fact you wanted to do this to flush out the old grease. Today’s newer boots seal better and the normal weeping of the oil is enough to clean out the contaminants.


BTW. I just came back from Dallas. Richardson actually. Had a GREAT time. Saw a Stars game. Went to the Stockyards and downtown Dallas. Beautiful City Dallas is Edited by: JohnnyO
 

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Thanks for the info JohnnyO. I did my first LOF today at 750 miles, didn't trust the factory to lube it right. Wish I would have read this before the lube job. Never really knew about the boot swell. A buddy at work gave me some cool little blue caps that cover the zerk fittings. Should keep em clean between lubes.


Now about that single zerk, I didn't notice a boot on that one? How much lube do you recomend on that one. Or did I just not see the boot.


Some of those are a ***** to get at. But I did find and lube all 11 of em.
 

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JohnnyO


Did your DMax make the trip with you? NJ to Big D would be a great road trip. Just took mine on her first trip. Went to SE Iowa deer hunting. She ran like a champ. To good really. My buddy got clocked at 83 in a 70 in Kansas, I got one for 70 in a 55 in Iowa. Hard to keep your foot out of it.


Thanks for the lube tips.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Roscoe:


With the fittings that have flat ends and no boots, just give one pump of the grease gun around every 12,000 miles. I slowly press on the gun handle and feel the resistance and if it feels too much I stop. This type of fitting will weep over time around the sides.


The idler arm actually has a rubber seal on the bottom. This type of seal, just like the ones on the tie rods, does not really swell.


The key thing to remember when greasing the chassis, u-joints, slip yoke and wheel bearings "Too much of a good thing is no good at all."


BTW the stock u-joints are un-greaseable.


Bowhunter:


Unfortunately, this was a business trip and I flew to Dallas and did not drive the truck and my travel trailer. The only consolation is it was TEXAS and the Avis dealer rents pickup trucks
.


I know what your talking about with the speed. Even towing you can go up big mountains and easily go over the speed limit.


Use the cruse control set at the speed limit!!! It's cheaper!!!
Edited by: JohnnyO
 

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Do you have a list of all the points I should be greasing on a K3500?

Are the wheel berings sealed on the 1996 models? My book didn't indicate a way to pack the berings.

Lastly does the automatic hubs ever need greased/lubed?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hi Lotharius-


The 11 fittings:

2 - Upper ball joints

2 - Lower ball joints

2 - Outer tie rod ends

2 - Inner tie rod ends

2 - Idler arm (one on top and one on the ball joint)

1 - Pittman arm

It is easy to miss the Pitman arm and the two on the idler arm assemblies. Their tucked up high and hard to see.
It's from the link below.


http://dieselplace.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=191&PN=1


This is for the 2500HD, I am not sure if it is the same for the K3500
 

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Does the bering between the two rear drive shafts ever need greasing?
 
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