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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, does anyone know if the Dually or generally there are no brake lines at Rockauto or I just don't find them?
I don't mean the hoses but the metal lines on the rear axle from the center to the right and left.
I also asked Autozone, o'Reilys, etc. while on vacation in the USA.
There is only the hose from the frame to the axle everywhere.

Or does anyone know that threads in each of the wheel cylinders to build yourself


Many thanks
 

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In general in the USA it is true you can not buy pre bent brake lines for cars or trucks. Most of the time we just buy the correct size line and make it ourselves.

Much of the time there is a standard fitting size for the line size but sometimes manufacturers didn't want to stick to that standard so they make adapter fittings and lines.

The small size line typically used in most places for brakes can be bent by hand so the only special tool you need is called a double flaring tool. For the small sizes a $15 flaring tool set works fine if you are careful and use it correctly.

There is one company that does make pre bent lines, not sure if they have anything for our trucks or not. They used to specialize in classic cars but maybe by now they have expended into trucks and ours are now old enough to be considered classics.

https://www.inlinetube.com/
 

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Thanks for that 57. They've even got the trans. cooler lines for my '93.:thumb:
 

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OK super thanks for the quick and detailed answer!

Thread is I think a 3/8 24 "UNF what I saw on the Center Line.

Do you happen to know which is the right adapter for the flaring device? Or how can I find out?
 

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https://www.summitracing.com/parts/otc-4503

This would be a typical basic set for brake lines. OTC is actually a decent name brand. You can find what appears to be an identical set for $15 pretty easily. I have seen them as low as $5. I bought a set from a store for about $20 about 15 years ago and it still works.

The trick especially to the cheap tools is to grease up the threads and shoot some oil into the pivot between the threaded shaft and the anvil part. Other trick is when clamping the line into the bars to first tighten the screw closest to the line first. You tighten the farther one last because the distance gives you more leverage to get it a good grip on the tube.

3/16 and 1/4 inch should be no problem for a basic and inexpensive too. 5/16 maybe. 3/8 and 1/2 I would spend a lot more on a good quality tool if I had to do many. The 3/16 can be bent by hand. 1/4 you most likely need a tool and for larger you for sure need a tool.
 

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Inline tube makes some very nice brake line kits.I bought a full stainless steel line kit for my 96 Chevy full-size regular cab from them.Fits perfectly.The transmission lines from them also worked out well.
 

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OK super thanks for the quick and detailed answer!

Thread is I think a 3/8 24 "UNF what I saw on the Center Line.

Do you happen to know which is the right adapter for the flaring device? Or how can I find out?
Usually the smaller brake lines that branch away from the Center over the rear axle are 3/16” that lead to the wheel cylinders and the larger line coming down the chassis that heads toward the rear axle is 1/4” size brake line.So use a 3/16 adapter for the 3/16” lines,etc.

Be careful with the fittings you decide to use.Some GM vehicles use a metric size diameter fitting into the wheel cylinders and not a standard size in some cases.A standard size fitting may appear to thread into the wheel cylinder perfectly but will not seal properly when you tighten the fitting.Yours is probably a standard sized fitting but I’m just saying to exercise caution so you don’t experience a leak.
 
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