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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I finally got my boost stick installed, and I'm having issues.

My truck has no power because the turbo won't spool up AT ALL! I was consistently getting P0101 along with P0234--the overboost code. I cleaned the MAF sensor with electrical contact cleaner, and so far it looks like that code has gone away (P0101).

The P0234 sets nearly immediately after starting and keeps the truck from building any boost whatsoever.

Sorry to start a new post, but I didn't see any other posts that mentioned overboost codes with the boost stick.
 

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Did you call Kennedy? The most frequent cause of what you described is getting the connectors plugged in upside down.
 

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I hope you got the extension. Did you try removing the stick? I never got any codes with it. Sounds to me like a bad connection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, Fingers. I could be a retard and just plugged it in wrong, but I took my time and made sure that I had the "arrow point" opposite the locking clip on the black connector.

I'm not quite sure how I would have gotten it backwards on either connector, but I have done dumber stuff before I spose...
 

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You would have plenty of company if that is what is wrong. #1 installation mistake. I've been trying to come up with a way to prevent the mix up without spending a fortune. If it makes you feel better, I've done it myself, and you know I know better.........
 

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The most frequent cause of what you described is getting the connectors plugged in upside down.
i have done it myself !!!! as a matter of fact on saturday , but noticed it before i was done changing some things !! hope that cures your problem ?
the05hd :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Nope, problem is not solved. I pulled everything apart and made absolutely certain that I have the connectors going the right way (I did) and that they're making good contact.

The P0101 problem seems to be solved after cleaning the MAF sensor. It hasn't been set again.

Now I consistently get P0234 and P2227 immediately after starting. I am unable to build any boost whatsoever--NONE! EGTs of course climb rapidly and truck has no power whatsoever--to be expected with no boost.

I'm really baffled...my truck is indeed an FE9 emissions truck. I have had the stock tune in the PCM during this whole ordeal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I should also add that I tried unplugging the EGR even though I've already got it blocked and am using a Finger Stick. The stick is soldered and definitely making good connections. EGR codes were set, but nothing other than that changed.
 

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You should have and should call Kennedy. Would have gotten faster response...

Chance it is a bad BS or wire or something. Remove it and call John.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I appreciate the help, Fingers. I didn't call Kennedy because I actually purchased the boost stick from another member on here, and I didn't want to drag him into this because I didn't feel right about it.
 

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I'll be adding an RMA number to the Survey thread. Please note on the sheet when you send in that it sets these codes and is suspect to be defective.
 

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Odd that it worked on one truck and not yours. There is a survey here that I would like you to fill out too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Update:

I finally had time this afternoon to pull the boost stick and return everything to stock.

Now I'm getting P0238 without any other codes! The turbo still won't build any boost whatsoever. This makes me wonder if the boost stick is really bad or not. I've had stock programming loaded during this whole ordeal, and I never saw this code with the boost stick installed. As soon as I pulled it, that's when this code showed up. I've cleared it multiple times with the engine running and not, and it immediately pops back up.

Help!
 

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Sounds like a different issue and maybe the BS is fine. The previous owner did confirm that it was in working order when removed.
 

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DTC P0238
Circuit Description
The boost pressure sensor measures the pressure inside the intake manifold. Pressure in the intake manifold is affected by turbocharger output, engine speed, accelerator pedal input, air temperature, and barometric pressure (BARO). A diaphragm within the boost pressure sensor is displaced by the pressure changes that occur from the varying load and operating conditions of the engine. The sensor translates this action into electrical resistance. The boost pressure sensor wiring includes 3 circuits. The engine control module (ECM) supplies a regulated 5 volts to the sensor on a 5-volt reference circuit. The ECM supplies a ground on a low reference circuit. The boost pressure sensor provides a signal voltage to the ECM, relative to the pressure changes, on the boost pressure sensor signal circuit. The ECM converts the signal voltage input to a pressure value.

Under normal operation the lowest pressure that can exist in the intake manifold is equal to the BARO. This occurs when the vehicle is operated at idle or when the ignition is ON while the engine is OFF. Under these conditions, the ECM uses the boost pressure sensor to aid in the diagnosis of the BARO sensor. The highest manifold pressure occur when the turbo charger output is high. Manifold pressure can range from 58 kPa (8 psi) when pressure are low, to more than 240 kPa (34 psi) when pressure are high, depending on the BARO. The boost pressure sensor has a range of 33-255 kPa (4-36 psi). The ECM also uses the boost pressure sensor to provide engine overboost protection.

The ECM monitors the boost pressure sensor signal for pressure outside of the normal range. If the ECM detects a boost pressure that is excessively high, DTC P0238 sets.

DTC Descriptor
This diagnostic procedure supports the following DTC:

DTC P0238 Turbo Charger Boost Sensor Circuit High Voltage

Conditions for Running the DTC
The engine is running.

Conditions for Setting the DTC
The ECM detects that the boost pressure is more than 254 kPa (36 psi) for 2 seconds.

Action Taken When the DTC Sets
The control module illuminates the malfunction indicator lamp (MIL) on the second consecutive ignition cycle that the diagnostic runs and fails.
The control module records the operating conditions at the time the diagnostic fails. The first time the diagnostic fails, the control module stores this information in the Failure Records. If the diagnostic reports a failure on the second consecutive ignition cycle, the control module records the operating conditions at the time of the failure. The control module writes the operating conditions to the Freeze Frame and updates the Failure Records.
Conditions for Clearing the MIL/DTC
• The control module turns OFF the malfunction indicator lamp (MIL) after 3 consecutive ignition cycles that the diagnostic runs and does not fail.

• A current DTC, Last Test Failed, clears when the diagnostic runs and passes.

• A history DTC clears after 40 consecutive warm-up cycles, if no failures are reported by this or any other emission related diagnostic.

• Clear the MIL and the DTC with a scan tool.

Test Description
The numbers below refer to the step numbers on the diagnostic table.

A short to voltage on the 5-volt reference circuit will cause DTC P0653 to set.

This step tests the signal circuit of the boost pressure sensor for a short to voltage. The short may backfeed through the sensor to the 5-volt reference circuit causing DTC P0653 to set.

Step
Action
Values
Yes
No

Schematic Reference: Engine Controls Schematics

Connector End View Reference: Engine Control Module (ECM) Connector End Views or Engine Controls Connector End Views

1
Did you perform the Diagnostic System Check - Engine Controls?
--
Go to Step 2
Go to Diagnostic System Check - Engine Controls

2
Turn ON the ignition, with the engine OFF.
Observe the Boost Pressure Sensor parameter with a scan tool.
Is the pressure more than the specified value?
254 kPa (36 psi)
Go to Step 4
Go to Step 3

3
Observe the Freeze Frame/Failure Records for this DTC.
Turn OFF the ignition for 30 seconds.
Start the engine.
Operate the vehicle within the Conditions for Running the DTC. You may also operate the vehicle within the conditions that you observed from the Freeze Frame/Failure Records.
Did the DTC fail this ignition?
--
Go to Step 4
Go to Intermittent Conditions

4
Monitor the Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) Information with a scan tool.

Does the scan tool indicate that DTC P0653 is also set?
--
Go to Step 7
Go to Step 5

5
Turn OFF the ignition.
Disconnect the electrical connector of the boost pressure. Refer to Boost Pressure Sensor Replacement .
Turn ON the ignition, with the engine OFF.
Does the scan tool indicate that the Boost Pressure Sensor parameter is less than the specified value?
36 kPa (5 psi)
Go to Step 6
Go to Step 8

6
Remove the boost pressure sensor.
Connect a jumper wire between each of the terminals in the boost pressure sensor harness connector and the corresponding terminal at the boost pressure sensor. Refer to Using Connector Test Adapters in Wiring Systems.
Measure the voltage from the low reference circuit of the boost pressure sensor at the jumper wire terminal to a good ground with a DMM. Refer to Measuring Voltage Drop in Wiring Systems.
Is the voltage more than the specified value?
0.2 V
Go to Step 9
Go to Step 10

7
Turn OFF the ignition.
Disconnect the electrical connector of the boost pressure sensor. Refer to Boost Pressure Sensor Replacement .
Turn ON the ignition, with the engine OFF.
Does the scan tool indicate that the Boost Pressure Sensor parameter is less than the specified value?
36 kPa (5 psi)
Go to DTC P0653
Go to Step 8

8
Test the signal circuit of the boost pressure sensor for a short to voltage. Refer to Testing for a Short to Voltage and Wiring Repairs in Wiring Systems.

Did you find and correct the condition?
--
Go to Step 14
Go to Step 13

9
Test the low reference circuit of the boost pressure sensor for high resistance or an open. Refer to Circuit Testing in Wiring Systems.

Did you find and correct the condition?
--
Go to Step 14
Go to Step 11

10
Inspect for poor connections at the boost pressure sensor. Refer to Testing for Intermittent and Poor Connections and Connector Repairs in Wiring Systems.

Did you find and correct the condition?
--
Go to Step 14
Go to Step 12

11
Inspect for poor connections at the engine control module (ECM). Refer to Testing for Intermittent and Poor Connections and Connector Repairs in Wiring Systems.

Did you find and correct the condition?
--
Go to Step 14
Go to Step 13

12
Replace the boost pressure sensor. Refer to Boost Pressure Sensor Replacement .

Did you complete the replacement?
--
Go to Step 14
--

13
Replace the ECM. Refer to Engine Control Module (ECM) Replacement .

Did you complete the replacement?
--
Go to Step 14
--

14
Clear the DTCs with a scan tool.
Turn OFF the ignition for 30 seconds.
Start the engine.
Operate the vehicle within the Conditions for Running the DTC. You may also operate the vehicle within the conditions that you observed from the Freeze Frame/Failure Records.
Did the DTC fail this ignition?
--
Go to Step 2
Go to Step 15

15
Observe the Capture Info with a scan tool.

Are there any DTCs that have not been diagnosed?
--
Go to Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) List
System OK
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Well, I must have messed something up then, but I'm not quite sure how I did it.

Based on what Max Payne has helped me with, I'd better check to make sure I didn't bend any pins on the connectors.

Can I remove the coolant pipe without causing a bunch of headaches? I suppose I'll end up spilling a lot of coolant, and I'll also have to bleed the air off once I get it back together, correct?
 

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Pipe comes off fairly easy. Drain the rad some and the mess is minimal. The sensor bracket is pinned down by a few hard lines, but they can be moved too. I would use an inspection mirror to check for bent pins before tearing things apart.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Good idea, Fingers. I didn't ever think about using a mirror!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Update:

I pulled EVERYTHING apart so that I could straighten the pin I bent on the boost sensor. I got it all installed, and now I have P2565 and the truck still won't build any boost.

P0234 and P0238 have gone away. I'm about to go nuts over this deal!

I have no idea what could be going on now...I know for a fact all the connections are good with no bent pins this time.
 

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That's turbo vane position sensor code. You must have messed with something at the junction box below the coolant pipe. Near the baro sensor.
 
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