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Discussion Starter #1
I'm too lazy to look under my truck... What does the block heater heat on the Dmax?? DOes it heat the oil in the pan or the cooling system somewhere? How warm does it actually keep the motor? ANy idea how much power or watts it draws form the outlet?





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It does not heat the oil. The temperature it gets to depends on the ambient or how fast the heat is being pulled away via convection, conduction and radiation. Convection is the dominating factor. I want to say the heater is 750W, but I am not possitive. Taking the time to reroute the cord will make your life easier this winter.
 

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The block heater heats the block. It will heat the block quite warm if the vehicle is kept out of the wind. (warm to the touch)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have not even dug the cord out yet, where should it be rerouted too?


I plan on running with the grill cover on in the winter, all i tow in the winter is a tiny open snowmobile trailer so it will not need much air, anyway that should hold the heat in and i always park the truck right up against the garage door and next to my enclosed trailer so its sheltered pretty well from the wind. if its 700+ watts i guess i will put it on a timer i bet that uses a lot of electricity! Any idea if it cycles on and off if its senses the engine is pretty warm or is it just strictly on or off?





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Plug it in.....on all the time!!! It is just a coil that goes in the right side of the block. No thermostat to cycle it. The electric cord plugs right into the heater. GM uses about the same set up on all cars and trucks with block heaters.


The cord for the heater is tied to one of the lines under the fuel filter. If changing the filter with the inner finder out, it is easy to get to then easy to route to the front of the truck.
 

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You can also take out the passenger side headlight and run the cord out there. I don't need it much, but I have found out that a timer seems to work very well. For me about 3 hours seemed to be plenty of lead time. I don't know how cold it get's where you live, but if it get's real cold you might want to look into an oil pan heater. It will start even when very cold, but warm oil will circulate sooner.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Western NY we get lots of snow and cold!!!! I figured i could use my pool timer thats gets put in a box all winter for my block heater since i can't use my pool in the winter!!!!!!!!





I'll have to dig out that cord in the next few weeks, do the headlights still pop out with no tools? My '00 just had a few bars to twist outward and the light was free from the body???
 

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Sounds like the headlights were the same in 00 as they are now. The hardest thing about repositioning the block heater cord is finding it. Take out the headlight first you should see the cord easily then.


I see your a bike racer, You don't happen to know a guy named Paul Gast do you? He is from NY state I believe. He used to run H2 Kawasaki's in the late 70's and early 80's. I think his shop was called Fast by Gast. We were building 900 turbo bikes at the time. 8.6's at 160's.Edited by: a64pilot
 

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HOW MUCH ELECTRICITY DO THEY USE??WONDERING WHAT MY BILL WILL LOOK LIKE CAUSE I MOSTLY DRIVE MY 2003 SIERRA 3500 ON THE WEEKENDS...ALSO DO THESE DRAW ALL THE TIME OR IS IT A ON AND OFF THING??
 

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Discussion Starter #10
a64pilot said:
Sounds like the headlights were the same in 00 as they are now. The hardest thing about repositioning the block heater cord is finding it. Take out the headlight first you should see the cord easily then.


I see your a bike racer, You don't happen to know a guy named Paul Gast do you? He is from NY state I believe. He used to run H2 Kawasaki's in the late 70's and early 80's. I think his shop was called Fast by Gast. We were building 900 turbo bikes at the time. 8.6's at 160's.




Yes i know Paul, he has a great shop and is the premeir carb guy for the lectron carbs that we all run on these bikes todayand now he races Prostock bike, he won Prostar's championship many times, and runs on the NHRA circuit for a few races a year, check his site out, www.fastbygast.com He is still the MAN when it comes to H2's also. His business is HUGE now, he has a Viper with 800HP plus and a Porsche twin turbo thats just about as sick he runs them at our track occasionally.





heres a small pic of my bikes.











The blue one runs 8.3's @160 and the other one runs 8.70'[email protected]. both are still push button start relatively (for drag racing) low compression motors. another few weeks and the season is over...... My next bike project will have a turbo on it, just need to sell a few toys first
 

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GSXR,


I know it's off topic, but I was working in a shop in Americas Ga at the time. Circa 1980 I believe. At the time it was called Star cycle. Now I think it's called Star racing. George Bryce owns it. I met Paul at the world finals at Gulfport Mississppi. We ran against him in the last heat for the money. He was really the only one that really had us worried. It was the only really fast two stroke drag bike I had seen. I think he was running NO2?


I'm sure you'll love a turbo bike. If their like the old ones their quiet, smooth, even idleing, a lot like a street bike and make power like an electric motor. We went quicker by short shifting them though. Maybe because at the time we only had two valve heads?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
George Bryce is very well known also in todays prostock bike world, he is one of the best tuners out there, thats how Angelle got those chamionships the past few years. You know all the legends of the sport!!!!!
 
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