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Discussion Starter #1
I am going to Yellowstone for Xmas break. I will be camping there for 9 days and taking pics of the wildlife. Whats the coldest temps my truck will start at with the primrose 409 added?

What things can I do in the wild to help?

Whats the coldest your truck has started withOUT the heater plugged in?
 

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Reminds me of the popcorn question. "where is that microwave plugged in?" "Tucson..."





Jess
 

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I don't think you will see cold enough temperatures for your truck not to start. I have personally started mine at -15 without being plugged in. It hasn't got any colder then that yet. That was 15 hours since that last time it ran. I thought it was plugged in but it wasn't.


You should plug it in whenever you can.
 

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G * N * R * T * R .....

Would anyone like to buy a vowel ?? I started mine 17 below Amsoil 15w 40 synthetic .... Pegged the oil pressure for quite awhile,driving .... I've switched to Delvac 5w 40 now and haven't takin it North sense in the winter ,to frickin cold anyway ,burrrrr .....

Mac
 

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Mackin said:
G * N * R * T * R .....

G * N * R * T * R = 4.61307457 × 10<SUP>-09</SUP> m<SUP>8</SUP> kg<SUP>3</SUP> s<SUP>-10</SUP> A<SUP>-1</SUP> K<SUP>-2</SUP> mol<SUP>-2</SUP>
 

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I had no problem starting at 20 below. It idles rough for a few seconds then everything is normal. The challenge is running it hard enough for the heater to work worth a crap. It generally takes 3 to 5 miles of driving before I can feel any heat. If I get it warm then let it idle for a while it will cool back down to almost no heat again. I was recently in a new 4D 6.0 on a cold day and it acted the same. I guess that current generation engines are just too efficient to heat well. --SS
 

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Problemchild,


I live just outside of the Northeast entrance of Yellowstone and have started my truck at -25 with no real effort at all. People that come this way from the East to snowmobile Park East of town where they stop plowing the road 10 miles away. (A mountain pass that they can't plow and saves driving around 175 miles and $20 for the park entrance.) Anyway there is a lot of Diesels parked in that parking lot with no electicity or a service station for 80 miles. I can't tell you how many times we have had to drag a generator out there to start fords. Never once have we had to go out to start a Duramax!!!!!!!!!!!!


Where are you going in the Park???


Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Bigsky1

This is what a camera forum member told me to do. ---->

"The area around Mammoth Hot Springs is open year round. This is a major thermal attraction and is the photo on the front page of the Yrllowstone National Park Map. It is a huge series of springs and terraces. During the winter the elk bed down here. It is well worth the trip.

The road then goes from Mammoth to Cook City and is open year round. It runs for about 65 miles through the park. The Lamar Valley is certainly a main attraction. It is consider by many to be the number one wildlife photography spots in the lower 48 states. This time of year you will see more than a few pro's with names you would recognize with very big glass photographing here. The main attraction is the Druid wolf pack. Thier main food source are the buf that use this as their winter range. If you go watch for crows and ravens. If you see more than one or two in the area there is a good chance they are feeding on a carcass. This is a great chance to photograph wolves and coyotes".
 

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The 409 will cover you on the fuel side and if you are using Delvac 1 (or other full synthetic), will be no problem whatsoever..
I am personally familiar with several Duramax's so equipped that have been exposed to 20+ days of sub-zero temperatures, sitting in exposed wind, no plug in, and started almost immediately..
George Morrison
 

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Another thing, if you leaving your truck sit for a few days, don't leave anything on. Don't leave your cellphone plugged in or anything else that could drain the batteries.
 

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Another minor point: if you can park the truck so that the front of the vehicle it is not exposed to prevailing wind, it will help tremendously.
Metal, batteries, etc. will not reach a temperature lower than ambient and are not 'directly' affected by the "chill factor" but battery temperature rate of fall can be affected by exposure to wind. i.e. if you expose the front of the truck to a prevailing 0 degree, 20 mph wind, the battery temperature will drop sooner than if it is not exposed to direct cold wind..
George Morrison
 

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Problemchild,


The info on the Park is correct. Lots of elk/bison in mammoth and lamar right now. The wolves are around too. Between Gardiner and Mammoth you have to stop and check out the hot pots. You can swim in the hot thermal water as it dumps into the gardiner river. The campgrounds that are open right now are mammoth and the forest service campgrounds in and around Gardiner. You can still camp in the backcountry but depending what you are looking for there is a lot of snow already. Good luck and if you have specific questions PM me.


Oh yeah Georgecls and Max have great suggestions these are the things that those of us who grew up in the cold just do with out thinking. Do all of this and you will not have a problem.


Steve
 

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Problemchild,


If you buy fuel in a warm climate, and are driving to a cold climate, use a good fuel additive. Fuel in cold climates is formulated differently to prevent fuel waxing. Diesel fuel can develop wax deposits on your fuel filter at temeratures below 40* F. This could clog your fuel filter and leave you stranded. Water in your fuel filter, or elsewhere in your fuel system can freeze as well. My Brother went on a GM cold weather test trip. All the diesel's fuel filters waxed because they were using a fuel formulated for warm weather use. This left them stranded, until they could get tow trucks. This was under extremely cold conditions, but with bad fuel, could happen in less severe conditions. I would suggest you use a good additive just to be safe. Stanadyne and Racor are the only ones recommended by GM.


Have Fun, that sound like a cool place to go!
 
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