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Discussion Starter #1
Hello to Anyone who reads this:

Ok. I have a 8600lb GVW 'Burb. How do I know if I have high flow oil cooler and lines? If I don't, can I put it on? I know that Lubrication Specialists get attention here for their lines. What about the Heath Blue Ribbon setup? Heath costs quite a bit more $$$ than LS sells their kit for. Heath says this: "Heath Diesel's Blue Ribbon Oil Cooler Kit is a heavy duty replacement for 1993-2000 6.5L Diesel Trucks." When does one decide to replace the oil cooler? Do you take the oil cooler out and have someone flush it? I haven't had any breakdowns or engine failures or seizes. I read on one thread that you might as well just replace when an engine blew up. Anyhow, wondering about the $150 difference between Kennedy and Lube Specialists complete kits? Or should I just replace the hose kits?

Additionally, there's a lot of oil around the passenger side of radiator inside the compartment - not the grill side. I've just applied gunk & rinsed and need to go back for a second round. What causes leak up front there? I don't seem to be losing any tranny fluid.

Another question I have is about the fuel line. Original owner had converted to biodiesel and it didn't work. He reverted back. There's a small filter between tank and lift pump. Is that normal? And there is also a filter under the front passenger - what's that do? Thanks much.
 

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Heath is very overpriced on everything he sells. His lines are no better than Lube specialist or Leroy Diesel. The factory oil lines are a ticking time bomb , at best. The 97+ engines used a high volume oil pump because piston squirters were added. The high volume engines[506 casting] use larger oil cooler lines.
Leroy and possibly Lube Specialist sell line kits that re-use the factory oil cooler. The factory cooler has oddball fittings. Chances are good that the factory cooler will get damaged removing the oil lines.
A pre lift pump filter is common when the factory sock in the tank is removed.
 

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I would not worry about damaging the factory cooler fittings.
You have to hold both ends of the fitting with tools when taking it off or putting it back on.
Plus a lot of lubricants before doing the job when taking it off.

As for which one is good, it depends on how much you want to spend: reusing the old cooler or getting a new cooler.

I supposed you have to check the current conditions of the one in the truck.

All kits will include steel braided hydraulic lines with the proper fitting.
The biggest challenge will be working on reinstalling the fittings on the engine side.
There are just no space for tools to get the proper grip so you have to take your time.

As trying to guess what other leaks on the driver side, also check the coolant lines.
There is also a turbo return lines there.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
My cooler lines and cooler came in from Lubrication Specialists today. Looking forward to installing. Don't expect to do it for a couple of days. And that's unfortunate, it's going to get very cold here in Michigan and I do not have a heated facility. Ah well...

Cheers!
Dave
 

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IMO, I would not want to do it when it is cold unless you have a lift plus there is not much space up where the fittings need to go into.
 

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Be prepared for an oil bath, no fun in the cold.
 

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I don't think I would do it outside if its below freezing. Way too much fiddling around that isn't fun at normal temps on a lift. Can't imaging trying to do it laying in the snow.

If you have 15w oil in there it moves slow enough you can get out of the way. In my case it would not drain out of the cooler till I put it in front of a heater.
 

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My cooler lines and cooler came in from Lubrication Specialists today. Looking forward to installing. Don't expect to do it for a couple of days. And that's unfortunate, it's going to get very cold here in Michigan and I do not have a heated facility. Ah well...

Cheers!
Dave
Tip for ya...

Get a huge tarp covering the entire truck...

Get a small office type water heater, and 100’ of pex tubing, and a circulating pump.

Fill the water heater and tubing with 50/50 antifreeze... plug it in, and go inside for a bit...

In little time, the truck and engine will be cozy...

Use two tarps, one on top of the other to keep condensation off ya.
 

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Tip for ya...

Get a huge tarp covering the entire truck...

Get a small office type water heater, and 100’ of pex tubing, and a circulating pump.

Fill the water heater and tubing with 50/50 antifreeze... plug it in, and go inside for a bit...

In little time, the truck and engine will be cozy...

Use two tarps, one on top of the other to keep condensation off ya.
I built a heated shop with a solar radiant floor, heavily insulated and a woodstove:clap:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
IMO, I would not want to do it when it is cold unless you have a lift plus there is not much space up where the fittings need to go into.
Got it up on some ramps - that was very nice access. I have a C2500 Burb which made it easier than those who have the 4x4. But I have to admit I prefer walking around to sliding on my back. It was cold - about 12F. Woohoo.
 

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Discussion Starter #11

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Discussion Starter #12
I don't think I would do it outside if its below freezing. Way too much fiddling around that isn't fun at normal temps on a lift. Can't imaging trying to do it laying in the snow.

If you have 15w oil in there it moves slow enough you can get out of the way. In my case it would not drain out of the cooler till I put it in front of a heater.
Well...finally did the full swap. Was fairly simple...but had to take my time as space was tight (very small garage bay). It was cold. Appreciated the 15/40 because it drizzled out slowly. Went and had lunch. Thankful I had the bay and didn't have to crawl around in snow.

Cheers
Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I would not worry about damaging the factory cooler fittings.
You have to hold both ends of the fitting with tools when taking it off or putting it back on.
Plus a lot of lubricants before doing the job when taking it off.

As for which one is good, it depends on how much you want to spend: reusing the old cooler or getting a new cooler.

I supposed you have to check the current conditions of the one in the truck.

All kits will include steel braided hydraulic lines with the proper fitting.
The biggest challenge will be working on reinstalling the fittings on the engine side.
There are just no space for tools to get the proper grip so you have to take your time.

As trying to guess what other leaks on the driver side, also check the coolant lines.
There is also a turbo return lines there.
Put in a new cooler. Happy for the project to be completed. It was tight and wished that LS had put it in directions that early models will need to grind that ear off the exhaust manifold to get the rear, right-angle fitting in the hole. In the end I prevailed and feels so good to know that those critical lines are not going to fatally fail at any moment (though I suppose there's a slight possibility of that regardless.)

Thanks for the turbo line info. It's very crowded up front by passenger side with a cone shaped K&N hovering above that whole sticky mess of lines and oily crud buildup.

Speaking of sticky oily crud buildup - what is process favored for getting it off? Blasting is one option - but what kind of pressure can one use? Is there a favored solvent/soap/solution to cut it? I so want this engine bay cleaned up so I can see what are problems and not have jet black hands in an instant.

Thanks for the thoughts.
Cheers!
Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Tip for ya...

Get a huge tarp covering the entire truck...

Get a small office type water heater, and 100’ of pex tubing, and a circulating pump.

Fill the water heater and tubing with 50/50 antifreeze... plug it in, and go inside for a bit...

In little time, the truck and engine will be cozy...

Use two tarps, one on top of the other to keep condensation off ya.
Great suggestions! The tarp has been used in prior cold weather situations...though will have to utilize tarp two next round to keep condensation away - like that tip!

Never thought of the H2O heater/pex solution...good idea. Installed similar setup in my Grandmother's steps and porch when I rebuilt it to keep it clear of snow in winter. She loved it!!!
 

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Speaking of sticky oily crud buildup - what is process favored for getting it off? Blasting is one option - but what kind of pressure can one use? Is there a favored solvent/soap/solution to cut it? I so want this engine bay cleaned up so I can see what are problems and not have jet black hands in an instant.
I'd prepare the electrical connections with something to cover them up from direct spray with water, either grease or aluminum foil etc etc. Then you can use a engine bay de-greaser and use low-medium water pressure to get the oil buildup off.
 

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Great suggestions! The tarp has been used in prior cold weather situations...though will have to utilize tarp two next round to keep condensation away - like that tip!

Never thought of the H2O heater/pex solution...good idea. Installed similar setup in my Grandmother's steps and porch when I rebuilt it to keep it clear of snow in winter. She loved it!!!
glad to help.

I've built radiant floor stuff for years... amazing comfort.:clap:
 

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You said you have a small garage. I use one of these when My heated shop is full and I have to heat my 30x30 garage. https://www.homedepot.com/p/ZOBO-30-000-BTU-Propane-Tank-Top-Heater-ZBTT30/301695639 It works ok not toasty warm but makes things comfortable. It would work great in a single garage. You can point it right at where you are working use it to warm parts and tools too. I have used it when the temps were down to single digits, teens F. It does not burn thru the propane like the forced air kind do.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I'd prepare the electrical connections with something to cover them up from direct spray with water, either grease or aluminum foil etc etc. Then you can use a engine bay de-greaser and use low-medium water pressure to get the oil buildup off.
Thanks for the suggestion.
How's it in Norway?
 

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You said you have a small garage. I use one of these when My heated shop is full and I have to heat my 30x30 garage. https://www.homedepot.com/p/ZOBO-30-000-BTU-Propane-Tank-Top-Heater-ZBTT30/301695639 It works ok not toasty warm but makes things comfortable. It would work great in a single garage. You can point it right at where you are working use it to warm parts and tools too. I have used it when the temps were down to single digits, teens F. It does not burn thru the propane like the forced air kind do.
That's good to know. I've never used one of those or been around one being used...wondered how well they work. I do have a small forced one but it was in a different city. Thx.
 

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