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Hello,

I've been reading posts on tandem pulling and did this a little backwards. Posting here after I have purchased everything. I ended up getting a short, 29'6", fifth wheel and only weighs about 8,000 lbs dry. My boat is 2,900 lbs and with trailer I am assuming around 3,900. I have 07 LBZ, 2500HD, short box extended cab. My GVWR is 22,000 lbs and the max towing is 15400. both trailers are tandem axle, first with electric brakes, and the second with surge brakes. Have new B&W companion sliding 5th wheel hitch, also have pacbrake air bags. With everything I should be right at or under the 70' length limit in Colorado.

I thought everything was fine but when I talked with a hitch company they said otherwise so I thought that I would reach out to the group here. The company said they would not recommend towing more than 2,000 lbs on the second trailer, and that they may consider 3,000 lbs with a dually. All they knew was the weight of the second trailer and class of my truck. He mentioned that the full ton Chevy trucks have big sway bars and are better positioned to handle any lateral movement. I thought the only difference between a full ton and 3/4 ton truck was the leaf springs. I did some research and the only capacity difference I see between 3/4, 1 ton, and dually trucks is the payload, but not the towing capacity. The GVWR for my 3/4 is actually more than a dually in some cases??

I am only traveling approximately 300 miles from home to lake and have no reason to not drive slowly, under 60 mph. I am taking my family and just want to make sure I am being responsible and safe, which I thought I was before I talked with the towing company. Thanks for any thoughts and or guidance!!
 

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Typically trailer tires, including those on your boat trailer are only rated for 60 or 65 mph, so check that out before getting too carried away. Also, some states do not allow triple towing, so check your state law on that also. I don't know where they came up with the term 'triple towing' when it involves only two towed vehicles, but that's what it's called. Last, make sure the 5th wheel is rated to pull the boat trailer. Some 5th wheel manufactures have weight limits on towed vehicles, and some will even void your warranty if you tow anything heavier than a bicycle carrier.
 

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could be an issue with braking capacity and stability of your truck. 2 trailers will create
a much more unstable braking situation under emergency braking.
 

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Emergency braking and sway would be my concerns. Don't know any way to find out other than try it carefully.
 

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Super Moderator Rather Be Fishin'
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... I did some research and the only capacity difference I see between 3/4, 1 ton, and dually trucks is the payload, but not the towing capacity. The GVWR for my 3/4 is actually more than a dually in some cases?? ...
There is also a difference in towing capacity.

The GVWR of the 2500's is 9,200lbs, the 3500 SRW's 9,900lbs, and the 3500 DRW's 11,400lbs.

The GCWR (truck + trailer) is 22,000lbs for the 2500 and 3500 SRW's and 23,500lbs for the 3500 DRW's.

The allowed payload and trailering capacity is based off those numbers minus the weight of the truck in each configuration. For example, a 4x4 3500 DRW with a long bed weighs a bit more than a 2500 ext cab short bed 2wd. That's why you sometimes see a dually configuration with less capability than a non dually, etc. In general, given equal configurations (i.e. regular cab vs regular cab, crew vs crew) the dually will be able to haul and/or tow a bit more, but it all comes down to the math.

The simple fact is, the DRW will ALWAYS be more stable for towing a given load, but may not always have the greatest towing capacity by the numbers. It will, however, always have the highest total gross weight rating.

Check out pages 10/11 of this PDF for some info on your truck's capacity.

http://www.gmcanada.com/media/vehicles/common/gmcl_trailering_brochure_02_EN.pdf
 

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It sounds to me like the hitch company was concerned with the capacity of your trailer more than the truck. It is common that 5th wheel trailers do NOT have the capacity in their frames to tow an another trailer, especially one that is about 4K lbs. Something light, say 1000 lbs sure, that's OK, but 4K is way more and much more of a load on the 5th wheel frame. It is a GOOD THING that you are using a 5th wheel and not a bumper pull as they are much more stable and their towing characteristics are more favorable and stable.

My trailer has a pretty good frame and the mfgr 'suggests' that no other trailers be towed behind their 5th wheels (or travel trailers). However, some others with the same trailer have had a fabrication company add supporting structure to the frame to handle another towed vehicle and have had no problems when towing that 2nd trailer. I also have a friend who tows his 26' TT behind his 2004 Dodge Dually and then flat tows his Jeep behind the travel trailer. Never had a problem, but then he was a professional truck driver for a number of years. His trailer frame was substantially strengthened when adding the trailer hitch for the Jeep.

Needless to say, good brake maintenance for all 3 vehicles will be an absolute necessity.

I would talk to the hitch company again and see EXACTLY what their concerns are. I doubt that it's the hitch itself that might be attached to your 5th wheel. And I don't think it's the truck.
 

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Hey Colorado,
Congrats on the set up, you will love it. I live in CO as well and have a Short bed crew cab Duramax. I pull a 40' Wildcat 5th wheel and 21' Tige boat. I have found that speeds up to 70mph are fine. Faster than that is not comfortable, especially going over bumps. The boat gets to squirlly. Aside from that, take your time. It's not as bad as people say. Those who are naysayers about this setup don't do much pulling, or pull large or heavy loads. They don't understand or are too afraid to try. I realize your post is a few weeks old. If you have not had a hitch installed, call Cowboy Metal. They are great and will hook you up. I have used another company for a previous 5th wheel and they did an okay job, but Cowboy was great. As far as the length limit goes, I wouldn't spend too much time worrying about that. I was told by the CHP they "have better things to do and check for". Once you hit Wyoming or Nebraska, they allow 80'.
JC
 

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40 feet, Damn, nice work. Probably not much different than my 29 footer honestly but not sure if I would push 70 mph. I think it would feel fine at 70 mph but just worry about something happening. At the end of the day when I tow that much crap I plan on staying a while so can take my time to get there. What have you done to your truck? is it a 3/4 ton?

I actually did talk to Kurt at Cowboy Metal, and I felt a lot more comfortable about towing after talking to him. He pretty much told me that weight doesn't really matter much, it is all about tongue weight.

Where do you take that tige? I tow a Malibu txi, just went up to ridgeway reservoir. It was actually a pretty sweet lake.
 

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Zhensely I am finally getting back to you. We go to a private lake in eastern Colorado. Occasionally we visit Wyoming but their rules are as bad as ours here. I ha e heard Ridgeway is beautiful but I have never been there. We live in Morrison. You?
 

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Sorry I hit send too soon. As far as my truck goes I have deleted it, put in a cold air intake and have EFI Live tuning. She runs great. Had a cummins before but this Allison/Duramax combo is the best.
 

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I have an 07 CCSB Duramaxtuner Allison. I have a Salem 25 RKSS 5th wheel that I tow my 17.5' Bayliner behind.

Camper goes about 6000# and the boat and trailer about 2650# for a total of 8650. Camper has brakes on both axles, boat trailer is single axle without brakes. My total length is just over 63' which is good since Ohio's limit is 65'.

Truck does well with the load. Have had no issues with sway or the trailers being "squirrelly." Only concern I have is with not being able to visualize the boat and trailer.

Go easy, don't push things, and you will be fine.

Mike
 

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I towed a double trailer for many years with an 2007 duramax and never had any problems. My boat (about 3000 lbs) is an single axle and once in a while it will sway out a bit to the side if you make sudden turn to miss a pot hole or something. Camper is about the same size at yours. Total length is 70'. One thing I did do on the camper was put on heavier bumper and reinforced the hitch.

You need to make sure you don't cut your corners short when turning and know where your going. Once you turn there's no going back as you can't back up with two trailers.

Not sure about pushing it too fast either. That's unless you have better roads than we have here.
 

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FWIW, towing behind a 5th wheel almost certainly voids your RV's frame warranty - it's clearly mentioned by many (most?) RV manufacturers now.

I've done it myself (did so for several years), but my RV was long out of warranty and I had the hitch installed properly.

Most importantly, I moved the wheels on my jetski trailer forward as to reduce the tongue weight that the second trailer put on the first - THAT's the major issue - RV's are not designed to handle that. Hanging hundreds of pounds of dynamic and bouncing weight on the back of your trailer is a recipe for bending and twisting your RV in places it may not handle bending and twisting well. I remember reading stories of cabinets that pulled away from their mounts inside the RV, slides that started to bind up, or doors that didn't open right anymore after heavy double towing. Basically, RV's are build so light now that their structure can't handle heavyweight double towing. I managed these issues by the aforementioned adjustment of my second trailer axle (it was easy, 8 bolts) to result in much less tongue weight. This still didn't reduce the push-pull forces, but those are less of an issue for the frame versus a heavy tongue constantly pounding up and down on the very tail of the trailer frame.

And check out your intended state laws before jumping on this - it's not actually even legal in many US states, and in others it may require special licence classes or endorsements. Here in Ontario for example there's several stipulations:

1/ First trailer MUST be a 5th wheel. Even a GN is a no-no. Tag trailer a definite no-no.
2/ Driver must be a full class A (commercial tractor trailer) licenced driver. NO other licence class is legal.
3/ 75' maximum

Increasingly the police are starting to pay more attention to recreational doubles and I've seen more than on the side of the road this year when the drivers found out the hard way they weren't legal.
 
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