Diesel Place banner

21 - 25 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,587 Posts
I think your lift is a problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
So now that I am back to looking at fifth wheels, when looking at them what will let me know the pin weight? will it say hitch weight? sorry for all the newb questions, just want to get it right the first time.

Thanx!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,363 Posts
Hitch and pin weight are the same thing. :thumb:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
The "pin" is that hitch point that will lock into the receiver in the bed of your truck. That is a dry hitch figure. The more weight you put in storage areas in the front of the trailer will increase that some. So you need some wiggle room with the ability of the truck to handle that. That is weight that you are putting on the rear tires and suspension.

And, again your really big problem is the lift. Think about the angle of the trailer if you are hitch, if you can even get hitched up considering the height of the bed and the fact the trailer may not clear the bed rails at the rear of the bed.

You may want to consider a bumper pull toy hauler.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
You may want to consider a bumper pull camper instead of a 5th wheel. What everyone is saying is the 6" lift on your truck is going to keep you from pulling a 5th wheel camper level unless you lift the camper. The 5th wheel hitch is installed in the middle of your truck bed. When you pull under the front of the 5th wheel, the King Pin which is on the camper needs to connect to the hitch in the bed of the truck. You have to have clearance between the bottom of the camper and the top of your bed rail. Most will tell you 5" of clearance is average. With a 6" lift on your truck, the hitch is setting way up off the ground which means the front of the 5th wheel is going to be way up off the ground to get hitched up and have clearance. This "way up off the ground" thing becomes a problem if the back end of the trailer is not also "way up off the ground". It causes the trailer to be nose high instead of level and that is not good. Some have installed lift kits on there campers to match the lift on the truck so the camper will ride level but this has to be done correctly or you will have a complete mess on your hands. Not to mention the problems of the added height of the camper. If you go with a bumper pull camper you can buy a drop receiver that lowers the ball so you can hook up and have your camper ride level. Trucks with lift kits and 5th wheel campers just don't play well together.
 
21 - 25 of 25 Posts
Top