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New to the forum. Loaded with great information. I have a trailer/truck combo question. I'm second questing if my truck is rated high enough to pull it. I know there are charts and calculations out there but those darn things confuse me. Looking for some assistance.

We are currently looking at purchasing a new 5th wheel (2016 Chaparral 390qsmb). Specs of the trailer are:
-dry weight 12,170
-pin weight 2230
-GVWR 15,000

I have a stock 2011 GMC Sierra crew cab 4wd with a standard 6.5 bed, 6.6L Duramax. Truck specs are:
-payload 2792
-GVWR 10,000
-chart shows "5th wheel hitch" 16,700 which I assume is the max trailer weight
-GCWR 24,500

After locating the below GM sticker in my door I'm even more confused with the axle rating/payload question for the 5th wheel we're looking at. I'm assuming this doesn't mean my payload capabilities are over 6,000lbs?!?!? What is this telling me??? Is this 5er going to break my truck???

Any input, help, or suggestions would be appreciated!!!
 

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You can pull that 5er just fine. Your pin weight is less than your payload capabilities and your truck is rated to pull more than the gross of the trailer. Just get a 16k or higher rated hitch, hook up and go.

....oh, and make sure you have adequate and healthy tires.
 

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Also, about 15 to 20% of you trailer weight will be on the truck (The 2230 lbs).
 

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You will be right on the edge of being overloaded if you go by rear GAWR with that fifth wheel dry, your tires are the weak link. I tow a gooseneck at about 13,500lbs with my 2013 and I am just under the max for the stock tires, and I have to make sure the trailer is loaded just right or I can be over 6400lbs on the rear axle(the rating on the stock tires).


With my gooseneck hooked up it has a pin weight of 2680lbs and I am 580lbs over the GVWR of the truck but 200lbs under on the rear tires. I have added air bags to level the truck with the trailer hitched up and that has helped. You have to figure that the 2792lbs payload does not include passengers, fifth wheel hitch or anything else you put in the truck.(any after market items installed on the truck).


Best bet is get your truck weighed with everything you plan on having in the truck then you know what you have to work with, I am going up to a 19.5" tire combo to get more of a safety cushion because I don't like being right on the max rating of the tires. I don't think a blow out at 60mph would be very fun.




 

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You don't say what your gross trailer weight is. I wouldn't do it. I have a 2015 2500hd gross trailer weight is 17,000 lbs we just bought a 29 foot 5th wheel gross weight is 10K. I want a lot of extra room for weight. By the time you load up your 39 footer you'll be pushing the max of your truck.
 

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IMHO, not enough truck for the trailer. I went from a 3/4 ton to a dually and am much happier with it. My 5er is 35 feet long. The last time out with a full load of water, etc, with the truck I weighed 23,900lbs. I have an 8ft box. My 3/4 ton was a short box and I had air springs on it. They do not change the GVWR of your truck. They just level it out. That truck will pull that trailer to hell and back but that's not what we're talking here. As said above get the truck weighed with what would be in it for a trip, IE, passengers, animals, hitch, what would be in the back. A CAT scale can weigh both axles with a load in the truck. Then subtract what that weight is from your GVWR and that tells you what amount of weight you can put on the truck when the 5er is hooked up. I just weighed the few crates of freezables I take out of the 5er for the winter and they weighed over 200 lbs.( I am starting to get cabin fever, I guess) So you can really load a lot into the 5er and may not realize what that weight is and it all has a bearing on the weight put onto the truck. If you used 20% of that 15000 lb GVWR of the 5er it would be 3000lbs on the hitch...if you loaded the 5er to max GVWR. Do more research and be safe.
 

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CAN it pull it, YES. Can you stop it, MAYBE. From what I'm reading you are (or will be) running right at your MAXIMUM all the time, and perhaps slightly over. Biggest issue most overlooked is ACTUAL axle weight ratings and tire load capabilities. We have all at one time or another pulled something greater than we should have. Best advice is look at worst case scenario and decide if you are comfortable taking that risk. Either a 3500 (SRW or DRW) or a smaller 5er are my suggestions.
 

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Like "bobmcgon" said, go with the actual weights.

You could use the trailer GVWR as the maximum , and then maybe have to work the loading so the pin weight doesn't over load the rear axle of the truck.... tire weight rating.

The sales brochure weights for both the truck and the trailer show the showroom weight. THAT IS NEVER A REAL LIFE SITUATION. You maybe surprised the weight of the "stuff" you carry in the truck and the trailer over time.
 

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2500s and 3500s have the same brakes, so stopping power isn't the issue...

It's mostly tire load, and spring ratings. Wheel bearing part numbers are the same between 2500/3500 rear axles.

The DRW will have different rear axle parts, but SRW is the same.


10 ply/Load Range E/121 tires should be rated around 3200lbs each, so you have a 6400lb tire weight rating per axle.

You'll have more issues with being tagged exceeding your GVW than pulling that trailer.
 

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Snipped....

You'll have more issues with being tagged exceeding your GVW than pulling that trailer.
In many jurisdictions, private and recreational vehicles are not licensed/tagged based on any particular weight. Therefore the laws in those situations tend to enforced based on the tire ratings shown on the tire sidewalls, rather than any decal in/on the vehicle(s). Just an FYI.
 

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In many jurisdictions, private and recreational vehicles are not licensed/tagged based on any particular weight. Therefore the laws in those situations tend to enforced based on the tire ratings shown on the tire sidewalls, rather than any decal in/on the vehicle(s). Just an FYI.
They factor in both up here in Canada... 10 ply tires will be sufficient... With the pin weight of the 5th wheel is below the payload capacity of the truck, which the tires will be rated for... Or should be....
 

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Don't know Canada's laws but in the US as long as you stay under your tire limits and appear safe (back not dragging, not weaving down the highway), law enforcement will leave you be. If you don't feel comfortable driving it then trade it in for a bigger truck. I've weighed as much as 29,000lbs over the scales and they checked my tires but let me go. Generally I'm not over 23,000lbs.
 

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Tire shops can't legally install tires with a lower load range/rating than what came factory, so that's not usually an issue...

Some of our provinces are more strict than others, but the rules are pretty much the same... My old 1/2 ton pulled my toy hauler just fine (albiet, not very quickly, lol), in Alberta, they don't care as long as you're not sagging horribly, but I'd get parked and towed in BC...

Unless the person pulling me over in AB was having a bad day, lol.

I know in the US you have a lot more variation between states... Including license requirements for certain combinations, I believe.
 

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In short the answer is you'll probably be over what the truck can do "on paper" based on all the various ratings...

but you'll be under what the truck can easily do in practical reality. I towed this:


For years with my '11 Silverado 2500 (CCRB, 4x4 just like your truck). I did add air bags and I do have some power mods (full exhaust/delete, intake and tune). However, it didn't "need" the power mods by any means, I just wanted to do them anyway. The air bags were a big help, however I did pull a few times w/o air in them and it was fine, it just bucked a bit more.

I was 25-26klbs combined with this rig when loaded up and it was no issue. Super stable (way more stable than my current RV), plenty of power, the exhaust brake is awesome so you hardly need the service brakes, plenty of service brake when you do use it. You will have NO issues.

-TJ
 

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Ive got a 5er with an 11,700 max weight, loaded up with all the crap and people in truck, when I put it on the scales its on the edge of the suggested axle ratings, drives and stops fine but I think you may be pushing it a little too far.
 

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Ive got a 5er with an 11,700 max weight, loaded up with all the crap and people in truck, when I put it on the scales its on the edge of the suggested axle ratings, drives and stops fine but I think you may be pushing it a little too far.
He should have no problems. Axle rating in doorjamb is considerably lower than the AAM rating for the axle. As long as you have a high enough rating for the tires you should have no problems.

Again I have over 544k miles on my truck now and regularly tow more than that. I have had to replace the left axle seal but the bearings were fine so I reinstalled them.
 
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