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Discussion Starter #1
My stock ride is pretty good now with the addition of the Bilstines but when I am pulling my TT with a 600lb hitch weight it feels like the truck is still fighting with the trailer. If I put the equalizer bars on it seems to be a little better but not great. I am thinking about the next step (pulling a leaf spring) I guess the question is which one. If I could pull one of the middle ones and have my truck about the same capacity as a ½ ton I would be ok with that or should I just pull the overload and put in air bags? Any opinions?
Could it be my hitch height? My hitch has my trailer about level (via eyeball) I think that is right but if it is high or low could that cause this? It feels almost like my hitch ball or the trailer tonge have slack in them. Edited by: Cruz_Man
 

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If I were you I would just install airbags and leave the overload spring for the extra towing capacity. I have airbags and the overload springs and I pull a large powerboat and 42ft car hauler with mine and no issues.
 

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Only 600 lbs? How much does the trailer weigh, exactly? Where are the axels on the trailer, forward of center? I would "add" weight to the hitch or raise the ball height just a tad.


Never pull a leaf. If the truck is "bucking" you're using the first stage of the leaf set and the "buck" comes from hitting the second stage, the BIG bottom leaf. Adding weight to the hitch should correct the problem. However, if you want that super smooth ride you'll need to "add" a leaf spring. Yes, I said "add" a leaf spring. Adding a spring will give your first stage spring set a better ride and reduce or eliminate the "bucking" you spoke about. You can add a leaf under the main spring, the one with eyes, or under the second leaf for "really heavy" hauling.





Burner---------->
 

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If I remember my towing basics correctly, Burner is right about the ball height. Seems like the ideal situation if you're pulling heavy is to have the trailer slightly nose high.


As for the equalizer, they were originally intended to stop sway in crosswinds and such, but worked out for weight distribution as well. I don't think I'd care to tow a bumper pull trailer with more than 500lbs. on the tongue without an equalizer. Depending on the hitch, some are higher, 500lbs is the max without an equalizer for tongue weight on a lot of Class IV hitches. Check your ratings....


And yes, I think you need more capacity in the truck's suspension, not less.Edited by: Zeeb
 

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Put some tongue weight on it, the tongue should be 10% of trailer weight.


I run more than that and it tows better.


For adjustable loads (flat trailer w/ skid loader) I look at the helper springs then load the trailer and keep pulling forward until I get my main springs down on the helpers then pull up a little more.


I've had over 2000# tongue weight and it pulls better than not enough.





What does the 30' trailer weigh?


What tire inflation are u running and when I went to the BFG AT they have a 3ply sidewall and that helps too.


What type of hitch are u using, a multi-adjustable or just a fixed tube?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
My trailer is about 5000 lbs (No I haven't went to the scale just yet.) and like most of you I believe the problem is the tonge of the trailer just doesn't weigh enough.


It is a travel trailer and loading the front of it isn't easy there is nothing in front of the axels. My fresh water tank sits over the first axel (closest to the truck) so I don't think that would help much. The excels on the trailer sit just aft of center. I must say that I am pretty suprised by the leaf springs on this truck. When I am sitting empty the truck only has about an inch of space between the primary springs the the overload spring (big one on the bottom). I can hit expansion jonts under exceleration and it feels like the back of the truck hits the overload spring. I never thought I might need to add a spring. Hell I think I might just get a heaver trailer.
Well I guess that makes sinse because I bought the trailer to go with a 1/2 ton and then upgraded trucks because I didn't like the way the 1/2 ton held up after pulling it. (tires out of balance, front tires worn funny due to the weight of the truck being put on the front by the equalizer hitch ect...
 

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I think your springs are fine. So is your hitch weight. I tow a 29' Sunnybrook TT. Hitch weight is around 1000 lbs, and it rides fine. IMHO, the issue for you is properly getting the WD hitch set up correctly, and adjusting your rear tire pressue to where it should be. I don't know what you are carrying in the rear of the truck, but if its primarily just the trailer you are towing, you won't need 80 lbs in the rear. The best way to get your hitch set up correctly is to go to a scale. That way you can see how much weight is being transferred to the front. You'll also be able to determine rear axle weight, and can use a load/range chart to determine rear tire pressure. I think you'll be much happier once you take the time to get things properly set up. For hitch setup procedures, see the towing section at www.rv.net.
 

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Cruz,


Remember we have "disk" brakes. If the Ya-Hoo's are swaping your tires, make sure that they tighten the lugnuts in the proper order and that they snug them before they hammer them down. 140ft lbs. is all that is needed to set the lugnuts...no more than 160. Having the lugnuts too tight can and will break studs as well as warp the rotars. That may have been part of the problem with the 1/2 ton.


If you do "add" a leaf I would suggest that you raise the front, via~torsion bars, about 1/2 to 3/4 inch and have the truck alined.


Burner------------>
 

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Cruz_Man,


It sounds like you're transferring too much to the forward axles. I agree with Roegs in that you need to check your WD hitch setup.


I have not hooked up my trailer, (30ft Trail-Lite, 6000lbs) yet to the truck, but I have put 400 lbs of sand over the axle for traction this winter, and I was able to put the main springs in contact with the helper spring.


I then took out 120lbs and there is about 3/8-1/2 in of clearance between the main and helpers.


With your trailer hooked up with 600 lbs of toungue weight, I think that you should have your trailer frame level and your truck should set almost level.


You should be able to play around with the number of links on your WD setup and get a good idea of how the truck and trailer will set. But I would have the hitch angles and heights re-verified.
 
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