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My source for fuel has just added Soy Bean biodiesel. I filled up the tank today and thought I would try a 600 mile supply and see how it works out, such as performance, milage etc.
I will see how the Duramax likes it? I also added my FPPF TP too. It appears to be about $0.03 per gal more. I have heard that it has much better Lubricity.


Engineer Bill
 

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Cool! That's not much of a price difference, I thought it would be at least 15 cents more...
 

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Conradv,


I think you'll find as more and more places start carrying it the price will drop (welcome to econ 101) but I have seen around our area the price of it dropping.
 

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what percentage of biodiesel is it? its just a blend right?
 

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Hi all


I just tried a tank of soy sause and It may be what is causing problems... I also replaced the fuel filter... My 94 k2500 6.5 td is now dieing for no apperant reason... I call Standadyne and the guy there said that the old injector pumps did not "see" the soy diesel right and it may cause the dieing.... or it could need a new pump... ouch... Seems to run ok when totally warmed up... Anyone else having problems??? Jeff near Indy
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Diesel Power


It is a blend. I will get more info from the fuel manager, ie blend%, possibly B10. This source is an agriculture business. He informed me that he was getting a lot of request for biodiesel. They have provided it for sometime to agriculture users.


I have driven only about 75 miles on it so far, it does appear that the DIC is showing a slightly lower MPG, it war 29F yesterday AM and it started right up the same as always, power seems the same. Too early to give a real opinion. I have read an article on soy bean biodiesel and it is supposedly to have a significant higher lubricity. I will quote below.


"Biodiesel also contributes to an engine's lubricity, or its ease of movement. Biodiesel acts as a solvent, which helps to loosen deposits and other gunk from the insides of an engine that could potentially cause clogs. Since pure biodiesel leaves no deposits of its own, this results in increased engine life. It is estimated that a biodiesel blend of just 1% could increase fuel lubricity by as much as 65% (U.S. DOE Office of Transportation Technology)."


Storm Chaser, this is for your concerns.


"Another problem is biodiesel's behavior as a solvent. Though this property is helpful, it's kind of a double-edged sword. Some older diesel vehicles (such as cars made before 1992) may experience clogging with higher concentrations of biodiesel. Because of its ability to loosen deposits built up in the engine (which may be there from old diesel fuel), biodiesel can cause the fuel filter to become jammed with the newly freed deposits. Biodiesel manufacturers suggest changing the fuel pump shortly after switching to high-concentration biodiesel blends. Components within these older fuel systems may also become degraded. In addition to deposits within the fuel system, biodiesel also breaks down rubber components. Some parts in the older systems, such as fuel lines and fuel pump seals, may become broken down due to their rubber or rubber-like composition. This is usually remedied by replacing such components. Though many manufacturers have included biodiesel in their warranties, potential for problems could still exist."


"Also, in some engines, there can be slight decrease in fuel economy and power. On average, there is about a 10% reduction in power. In other words, it takes about 1.1 gallons of biodiesel to equal 1 gallon of standard diesel."


Enigneer Bill
 

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I have been running B2 in my CTD and noticed a slight decrease in mileage, maybe 5-10% and a slight loss of power. I guess both stand to reason being that biodiesel has less BTU's per gallon then normal diesel.


Where the real difference is, is in the tractors. They are run at or near rated power and it is more apparent that fuel consumption is higher then normal #2 diesel.


A few farms around here have noticed that after switching over that fuel filters were plugging up quickly. I believe this is from what was mentioned ealier, the soy/diesel is acting like a solvent to clean/loosen deposits in the fuel system.


BTW it is about 3 cents more per gallon.
 

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The two points are:


1. You need to change your filters often as the biodiesel cleans out your tanks--at first. Later if you run biodiesel only, the filter changes will need to be done more rarely than with regular diesel.


and,


2. You have to replace any rubber parts in the fuel system can can break down--this includes things like rubber seals on fuel filters. This should not cost much uless you have an O-ring buried in an injector pump that is hard to change. And on most vehicles, you don't need to make any changes at all.


What I'd like to know, and I have not heard anything definatively yet, is this:


Does the Duramax need any rubber parts replaced if you run 100% biodiesel?


Does anyone know for certain?
 

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Replacing internal parts sounds like a nightmare.


I thought #2 diesel had detergents for cleaning.


GM is supposed to have approved one of the bio-diesel types for use in the Dmax. Then again, they've been wrong before.
 
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