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Discussion Starter #1
I changed the fuel filter @ 16,300 miles today. Here is the inside pictures.


History. I filled primarily at the local Mobil station. A very high volume diesel seller. I notice he changes his pump filters regularly. When on the road I stoped at Flying J or Pilot.


Started using Stanadyne Performance formula in November when the weather started geting cold. Ran about 6K miles with Stanadyne. Stanadyne in there now.


I noticed a lot of water is collected in the bottom of the filter. I suspecting the additive is enhancing the aquabloc abilities of the Racor filter. Hopefully this is preventing the water from getting to the injectors as GM recommends
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Notice drops of water.





Even more drops of water. A lot of grit trapped. And the infamous rust.














The dirtiest side of the filter.





The cleanest side of the filter.


 

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Reminds me that I saw the racor engineering manager state it was a good idea to drain the water trap once every couple of weeks. That would remove water from bottom of trap and allow corrosion inhibiters in the additive to "do their thing" on the bottom of the filter and prevent the corrosion that you see.


And even if you don't see any obvious water - I would still do it - the filter will attempt to remove free water and emulsified water; It may not be obvious that you are removing diesel fuel with high enough "humidity" to warrant it's removal. When the fuel cools - the water may "fall out" of emulsion...


I also remember that the racor engineering manager said that a build up of asphaltines on the filter will degrade it's effectiveness in removing water. The stanadyne will help stabilize the fuel and help prevent the formation of asphaltines due to fuel heating; This will reduce the build up of asphaltines on the filter, which in turn improves it's ability to remove water.


jeffEdited by: dmax lover
 

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Discussion Starter #3
dmax lover said:
Reminds me that I saw the racor engineering manager state it was a good idea to drain the water trap once every couple of weeks. That would remove water from bottom of trap and allow corrosion inhibiters in the additive to "do their thing" on the bottom of the filter and prevent the corrosion that you see.


And even if you don't see any obvious water - I would still do it - the filter will attempt to remove free water and emulsified water; It may not be obvious that you are removing diesel fuel with high enough "humidity" to warrant it's removal. When the fuel cools - the water may "fall out" of emulsion...


I also remember that the racor engineering manager said that a build up of asphaltines on the filter will degrade it's effectiveness in removing water. The stanadyne will help stabilize the fuel and help prevent the forming of asphaltines due to fuel heating; This will reduce the build up of asphaltines on the filter, which in turn improves it's ability to remove water.


jeff

Jeff-


Two very good points.


First I did not faithfully open the drain every few weeks. I am going to do that now. Your statement that in addition to draining any water, it would allow some of the fuel additive corrosion inhibitors into the bottom of the bowl, makes sense.


Second. I think you bring up the importance to change the filter at a minimum at the 15K intervals GM recommends. From the pictures it apppears that there is not a lot of black gunk on the filter and that you can go a lot more on the filter. That may not be the case. The filter may be gummed up with clear filmy contaminants.


I was thinking about the second point when I was looking at the filter. Even though it looked clean, there appeared to be a gummy coating on it. I just thought it was diesel fuel.
 

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Actually, with respect to asphaltines, the Racor project manager was really pushing for a two filter system. The first filter to remove the majority of the asphaltines so that the aquabloc treatment on the second filter was not compromised.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
OC_DMAX said:
Actually, with respect to asphaltines, the Racor project manager was really pushing for a two filter system. The first filter to remove the majority of the asphaltines so that the aquabloc treatment on the second filter was not compromised.

Thanks! I did a search on asphaltines. It turns out that's the black stuff we see on our filters: Asphaltines -- are components of asphalt that are generally insoluble and are generally present to some extent in all diesel fuel. These black, tarry asphaltines are hard and brittle, and are made up of long molecules. Fuel with a high percentage of asphaltines will drastically shorten the life of a fuel filter.


Here's a link to a nice article on fuel filter contamination from Baldwin:


http://www.baldwinfilter.com/engineer/94_14.htmlEdited by: JohnnyO
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Wickedsprint said:
Drain your friggin water drain more often :)

...Just did...Now my neighbors are mad at me.


Edited by: JohnnyO
 
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