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Old 06-28-2018, 10:00 PM   #11 (permalink)
jnlperformance
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Cracks and Splits

I won't be going into crack repair so much as it's pretty straightforward;

Identify the crack.

Sand surrounding area you will be attaching fiberglass too.

Glue crack together if you feel it's nessessary (I did not in this project, but if it's your first time I would advise it just for stability of the workpiece).

Clean with acetone just prior to application.(every time, all the time, just like paint)

Glass away.

I did this particular repair fast and easy, and did a one side repair, but if you wrap all the way around it will be much stronger. We will be doing that later on our missing piece.

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Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_152152.jpg   Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_152140.jpg  
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Old 06-28-2018, 10:16 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Missing Parts and Pieces

A very common error when attempting a repair with missing pieces is just jumping into it hoping it works. That never ever works. It's easier to make a sandcastle with soupy mud.

If you have missing pieces your gonna need to make those first, separately. Even if it's just a straight piece that's flat with no curvature, you'll need to make it before you attempt to repair your part. This is especially true if your part contains curvature. This could also be applied to the fabrication of a new part of your own design because that's what were basically doing.

This part could have been divided into an additional stage but I wanted to keep this super simple. The addition of a crossmembers beneath the mounting cup in hindsight would have been nice but oh well. This gets the point across.

Your going to need to start with a simple disposable mold.

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Old 06-28-2018, 10:31 PM   #13 (permalink)
jnlperformance
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The Mold

This is where we're going to use cardboard, tape, wax paper and the razor.

Its pretty straightforward when it comes to making your shape but it's not so straightforward when it comes to the reality of applying the fiber.

Tape the mold to a suitable surface. Resin is very sticky and your mold WILL move on you if you do not find a way to keep it immobile. Sure you can use staples or nails but later on you'll want to remove said mold in its entirety to bake in the sun and trim the piece effectively so... tape.

Resin drains. If your mold has areas in which resin will collect, make drains. A resin soaked part is no good, and dealing with accociated issues is a pain in the arse later on.

The wax paper and tape. Not only does the mold need to be firmly secure, so does the wax paper. Without the wax paper the part won't separate from the mold and you'll have a mold stuck to your part. That's no fun. Stray away from methods such as panty hose, chicken and fence wire... though very popular for some reason it's more trouble than it's worth. The wax paper must be secure for the same reason the mold base (cardboard) is secure. Resin is sticky and will everything will become displaced when glassing.

When using the tape to stick the wax paper down in compound curved areas, be sure to double wrap the tape. Wrap it once for a poster, sure... but it has a hole in the center that lifts up. You'll need to wrap it on the other plane to prevent this.

The whole goal of the mold is to keep it as STABLE as possible. You don't want anything moving around while glassing. If it can move... IT WILL. That will ruin your day. Take your time with your mold design.

So use the cardboard to create layers and shapes. Tape them up thoroughly to secure. Tape said shapes to the mold base to secure. Be sure to tape on as many planes as you can. X axis, y axis, z axis. Planes.

Once your mold is complete, cut out your glass accordingly and get it done using the method described above. Plan your pieces accordingly. Pre lay the cut pieces on the mold to check it's sizing and modify if nessessary.

When all is said and done you'll end up with one solid piece.

There are several methods for making a mold. This was just a fast and effective way to make a disposable mold. Most common type I use for repairs.

Other ways to create a mold;

Sand and glue or epoxy mix
Foam blocks
Bondo
Wood
A product called PorFoam is great but $$$. I stray away from this typically unless it's required.

Or a combination of any of those. $#*+, use whatever works. Just keep in mind how you intend on releasing the part from the mold.

A good product for this is PVA Mold Release, but again... $$$. You can also use cooking oil, bar soap, candle wax... anything that reminds you of wax paper or any of those materials will likely work. Today, it's wax paper.

Picture annotations;
2.) Note the possible gap in the tape. Plane 1. Axis plane 2 needs to be secured. So fold it over. Everything must be secure.
5.) Note the grill structure reference marks. Also note in pic #1 The reference for front. We will use the reference marks later. Definition of front and rear can be vital. This workpiece is definitely directional.
Attached Thumbnails
Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_123425.jpg   Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_125914.jpg   Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_125938.jpg   Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_122322.jpg   Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_125958.jpg  


Last edited by jnlperformance; 06-28-2018 at 10:41 PM.
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Old 06-28-2018, 10:36 PM   #14 (permalink)
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The Mold (pictures pt2)

More pictures...
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Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_130701.jpg   Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_131037.jpg   Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_131108.jpg  
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Old 06-28-2018, 10:49 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Trimming and Curing

Two different things to be noted at the same time. Do not wait for glass to cure to trim it. That's a pain and difficult. Sometimes resulting in a fair amount of blood. Trim when it's halfway hard, halfway flexible, but not sticky to the touch (yea those gloves are getting used up a lot don't touch with your bare hands).

You can use several methods of trimming. For long straight pieces you can use a sharpened paint scraper. For other more intricate areas; scissors and a razor work just fine.

Once the workpiece gets to a "certian" point all your left with is a hacksaw honestly. You can use a dremel or other cutting methods. I don't ever bother. A hacksaw byfar is the most effective manner in which I have found to cut this stuff when it is cured.

Picture annotations;
1.) Note those reference marks from earlier.
2.) Precutting when you can with a straight edge. In this case a sharpened paint scraper.
3.) Cutting with razor.
Attached Thumbnails
Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_153051.jpg   Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_153208.jpg   Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_153310.jpg   Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_154447.jpg   Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_153522.jpg  


Last edited by jnlperformance; 06-28-2018 at 10:52 PM.
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Old 06-28-2018, 10:56 PM   #16 (permalink)
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Trimming and CuringTri (pictures pt2)

More pictures...
Attached Thumbnails
Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_163024.jpg   Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_163349.jpg   Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_163420.jpg   Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_163745.jpg   Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_164407.jpg  

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Old 06-28-2018, 10:59 PM   #17 (permalink)
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Trimming and Curing (pictures pt3)

More pictures...
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Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_164612.jpg  
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Old 06-28-2018, 11:11 PM   #18 (permalink)
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Finishing Up

When your part(s) are cured up you may proceed to what you originally started doing. Attach the part in the same manor you would with the cracks, except you wrap the glass around said part if possible. Much stronger bond. In this case the grill would crack and bust up before that part would let loose.

In essence, take your time. Plan your next move thoroughly. Do not make haste. Use your imagination to overcome. Think outside of the box.

And above all, don't be afraid of the stuff. If you feel like what you did is subpar, pull it off before it cures. It'll slide or peel right off. Youll have about 10 minutes after your done to decide. 20 minutes from the second you mix the resin batch. Some light sanding and start again. Not really a big deal at all.

I hope you found this article useful.

Hope to see some stuff you guys make. It'll be cool. Broaden the horizons so to speak.

PM me or just shoot me an email if you have a question, I'll get to it as soon as I can.

-Michael.

Picture annotations;
1.)post trimming. I didn't bother with making this looking super nice and oem but it could be achieved with some resin, a syringe, some sanding, add some more layers on the crossmember and a support underneath and you would never know it was repaired...
2.)note I drilled the mounting hole post release from the mold but before I glasses it on
3.)grill without flash
4.)grill with flash
Attached Thumbnails
Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_225420.jpg   Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180626_165049.jpg   Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180627_012241.jpg   Simple, Cheap & Effective Fiberglass Repair and Part Fabrication-20180627_012251.jpg  
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